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GLM’s Top Words Record the History of the 21st Century, Thus Far

The Top Words of the Year Since the Turn of the Century

 

 

TRUTH:  2017 Word of the Year
Recently, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) announced that Truth is the Word of the Year for 2017.

 

Austin, Texas, December 7, 2017 — Since the turn of the century the Global Language Monitor has been using the most up-to-date analytical tools to track the growth and evolution of the English Language, now the first, second, or business language of some 2.38 billion people.

GLM has used these technologies to track many of the most significant trends to appear thus far in the 21st century.

In the recent past, some of the shifts first noted by the trend and narrative-tracking techniques of GLM include:

  1. The use of number sequences as clearly defined words (Y2k, Web 2.0)
  2. The use of Twitter as a new form of stylized human communication (2008/2009)
  3. The introduction of emoji symbols as an addition to and transformation of the alphabet (2013/2014)
  4. The rise of the Narrative presaging the rise of ‘fake news’ and the decline of ‘truth-based’ journalism. (2008)
  5. The mounting impact of the ‘sustainability’ and ‘Green’ movements (2006)
  6. The Rise of Microaggressions as a significant form of ‘bullying’ (2015)
  7. The continued emergence of English as the first truly global language (2000-)
  8. Big Data as the most frequently used but least understood word in High Technology (2011-)
  9. The application of data mining techniques to global English to better understand the significance of global events and trends (2013)
  10. The Rise of China as the most significant (and de-stabilizing) event of the 21st century, thus far. (2008)
  11. Unveiling the racist underpinnings behind the rise of Fake News.

 

The Words of the Year chosen by the Global Language Monitor can be used to better understand the history of the 21st century, thus far. 

The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century

 

 

2016

Top Words: No. 1 Meme, No. 2 Narrative, No. 3, #Resist
Top Phrases: No. 1 Make America Great Again No. 2 When they go low, we go high No. 3 The Electoral College
Top Names: No. 1 Donald Trump, No. 2 Vladimir Putin, No. 3 Neil Gorsuch

 

 

2015:
Top Words: No. 1 Microaggression (Safe Space, Trigger, Unsafe, Snowflake, White Privilege)
Top Phrases: No. 1 Migrant Crisis, No. 2 Je Suis Charlie, No. 3 Almond Shaming
Top Names: No. 1 Donald J. Trump, No. 2 Alan Kurdi, No. 3 Pope Francis

 

 

 

 

2014

Top Words: No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love), No. 2 Hashtag, No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases: No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot; No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names: No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War

 

 

 

 

2013:

Top Words: No. 1 ’404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

 

 

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 Apocalypse / Armageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

 

 

 

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

 

 

 

 

 

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Spillcam, No. 2 Vuvuzela, No. 3 The Narrative
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

 

 

 

 

 

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

 

 

 

 

 

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2007:
Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

 

 

 

 

 

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

 

 

 

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

 

 

 

 

 

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: No. 1 Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

 

 

 

 

 

2003:


Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

 

 

 

 

2002:
Top Word: Misunderestimate
Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

 

 

 

 

 

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

 

 

 

 

 

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print, and electronic media, as well as the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801-6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

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