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Politics 2016: Fighting the Last War, Again

Vietnam 2
It used to be said, that old soldiers are always fighting the last war. That they are trained in the techniques and strategies that were acquired on battlefields past, and the old lessons don’t always apply to the current fields of battle. In 2016, this lesson does not apply to the American Military who deal in contingencies of every imaginable stripe, but rather to the political class who seem to be impervious to the will (and pulse) of the American electorate.
Rather than trying to harness the anger beneath the surface, the political elite is attempting to ignore that which is in plain sight to in order to keep the control they have exerted over the electorate.

 

On the Republican side, senior leadership is arguing amongst themselves about how to stop Trump, the unannointed usurper.

On the Democratic side, there is some comfort in the fact that the party’s unelected, non-represetative ‘Super Delagates’ can direct the vote to whom they please, in a new (and ingenious) kind of voter suppression

While arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Syrian Civil War becomes ever more ominous,, which now has resulted in more than a quarter of a million civilizian deaths while ex-patriating millions of rufugees to an EU, which can’t keep up with the continuing inflow.
And, again, while arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Islamic State (ISIL or ISIS) captures huge swaths of Iraqi land, and an ever enlarging footprint in the Middle East (and now North Africa), and declares the existence a new Caliphate, which by tradition, all Muslims are ordered to support.
The same can be said for our political leadership in the current election cycle where the political reality in 2016 is in direct conflict with the will of their own people.

Not a day goes by without any number of screeching headlines referring to the Republican or Democratic leadership as well as the elite opinion makers attempting to stop the current political ‘revolutions’ and return to the more managable election landscape of elections past.

 

While Democratic and Republican Party leadership are busy fighting the last war (or eve worse the last several wars), the American electorate has been busy moving forward with eyes squarely on the current battle, writing headlines of their own.

Somehow it appears as if enough Americans have had their fill of the status quo — and are moving onto the new fields of battle, daring to lead the elites into a hazy, ill-defined political future.

Examples of Fighting the Last War:

  • Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders – OK, so they might actually win their party’s nominations. Obviously, this is a result of a series of major mis-judgements of Party Leadership of both parties. Stop managing expectations and start managing reality.
  • Deaths by Opioids — Every year, there are now as many deaths from Opioids in the US as deaths from guns. And this is affecting all demographics. Where is the outcry!?
  • The 1% — No matter how you define the elite, the facts remain that an ever larger percentage of the nation’s wealth is flowing to those at the top. And it is all too obvious that the banks that are ‘too large to fail’ are also ‘too large for jail’.
  • Middle East — Problems in the Middle East do not spring from George W. Bush, but rather from the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) and the creation of boundaries of convenience for the British Protectorate. Fighting the Last War (Iraq 2003) here has led to the ongoing struggles in Iraq, the deaths of hundreds of thousands in Syria, and the spread of the Islamic State.
  • Manufacturing Jobs — The focus on ‘bringing back’ lost manufacturing jobs — In numbers employed, the Service Sector topped the Manufacturing Sector in the 1970s. Since World War II the Manufacturing Sector has declined from about a quarter of total in percentage of total employment to just below 10% currently. Fortunately, the sector’s productivity has exploded and the US still produces about 20% of the world’s manufacturing output. But those millions of jobs (including three or four million shipped to China since the turn of the century) are not coming back.
  • Unemployment Under 5% — All Americans are quite aware that the employment number is not right. Does it include those who’ve given up looking for work? No. Is the largest prison population in the world included in the number? No. We all know those who are working two (or more) jobs to maintain their previous standards of living. Are the underemployed counted the same as the ‘fully employed’? Yes.
  • Focus on Identity politics — There is ample evidence that the younger population is not as focused on ‘identity politics’ as do the party’s elite. The current electorate focuses less on ‘race’ and identity politics, and more on the reality of income inequality, as well as disparities in opportunities, educational attainment, and employment.

 

Conclusion:

What is sure: the current electorate is delivering a resounding No Vote, a stunning vote of No Confidence to the current leadership of both parties. A good portion of the American public has decided that they are tired of past and present policy initiatives, and the ever smaller focus on slights delivered to each other each, than their concerns with a world teeming with war, terrorism, and economic inequality.

 

Flashback: Gulf Oil Spill and Rise of ‘the Narrative’ in Politics

The Importance of Tracking Evolving Narratives

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Gulf Oil Spill Vs. Katrina

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Obama vs. BP

The Lesson of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is the importance of controlling the narrative, since whoever wins of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital — for good or ill.

Austin, TX, June 02, 2010 (Updated May 24, 2014) — In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, there are now several differing story lines emerging from the Gulf Oil Spill. The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

Colleen Ross: How Obama Lost Control of the Oil-Spill Narrative (CBC)

The Narratives emerging from this on-going (and slow-moving) disaster include: Obama was Slow to Respond – 95% of the social media conversations characterize the President Obama as ‘slow to respond’. Obama vs. BP: who’s in charge? — 52% see BP in charge of the spill. This may or may not be a political liability. Democrats need the blame assigned to BP; at the same time, Obama needs to be seen as in overall control of the disaster Worst environmental disaster ever – 42% see the current spill the worst environmental disaster ever. Federal Response — 57% see the Federal response using ‘poor’ or related keywords. Not a good month for the Feds; come to think of it, not a good year for the Feds. Katrina vs. Exxon Valdez – 61% make the comparison to the Exxon Valdez; about 39% compare the ongoing spill to the inundation of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

 

Biblical Prophecies Abound Once More — About 61% of all references involve the Bible. (Even Ted Turner has a theory how the oil spill might be a warning from God.) These are markedly different in tone than those used with Katrina where the references focused on apocalyptic imagery, End-of-the-World scenarios and doom. The Obama Style of Leadership – This is a close one 52% see Obama as ‘hand’s on’ leadership, 48% see ‘hand’s off’. Again, this is either positive or negative depending on your political bias.

Clarence Page: How stories, true or not, drive politics

Ronald Reagan was seen as a ‘hand’s off’ president and that was considered good. Jimmy Carter was a ‘hand’s on’ type president and that was considered bad. “The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important to track since he who wins control of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “With the mid-term elections just five months away, and the prospect of the Gulf Oil Spill continuing unabated for months, control of the narrative is more important than ever.” The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters. The term ‘narrative’ in this sense is now appearing thousands of times in the global media on the Internet and blogosphere as well as throughout the world of social media, meaning the main streams of public opinion running in the media that needs to be fed, encouraged, diverted or influenced by any means possible. GLM recently announced The Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), in partnership with OpenConnect Systems of Dallas. The Healthcare NTI is the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™).

The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity. About the Global Language Monitor Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

 

Obama and the null set narrative

Reprinted from The Hill, May 31, 2009

Obama and the null set narrative

By Paul JJ Payack

We have been analyzing the narrative of Barack Obama for some years now. In fact, we’ve tracked three differing narratives in the course of his campaign and the first term of his presidency. We’ve tracked the president’s highs (the “Yes we can!” Grant Park Speech, and others of soaring rhetoric), and his lows (the much more pedestrian Gulf Oil Spill effort).

We’ve been praised for our astute analysis, and condemned for announcing his premature political death. At the time, the Global Language Monitor’s analysis of the BP Oil Spill speech was actually pulled off CNN and replaced by a far milder critique. In retrospect, that speech was a harbinger of what was to come — Barack Obama bereft of Hope and Change.

Not that we didn’t have hints about of what was about to transpire. Consider the disposition of these “hope-and-change type” promises: (1) the immediate shutdown of Guantanamo, (2) the end of the K Street revolving door and (3) holding the bankers accountable for their part in the financial meltdown. How exactly do you make sense of these countervailing (or even contradictory) positions?

Obama and the null set narrative.

Now consider the president’s recent speech on U.S. defense policy: after ramping up the use of drones against “enemy combatants,” with hundreds of civilians deaths by the administration’s own estimate, he stands firmly against gratuitous drone strikes. After keeping Gitmo open for going on five years now, he will now do everything in his power to close it. How to make sense of these seemingly oppositional positions?

The null set narrative.

In the run-up to the 2010 midterms, we began to formally track the president’s narrative. We were curious to better understand how the word ‘narrative’ rose to be the No. 1 political buzzword at that time and what it meant to this presidency. Other terms frequently used to describe Obama at the time, included: detached, aloof, hands-off or professorial. Some took these words to be demeaning and/or insulting.

Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “The danger comes when politicians and their operatives essentially use ‘narrative’ … the version of the truth that they want us to believe even when they don’t believe it.”

Since his reelection last November, we have remained silent on the subject — awaiting the second term narrative to emerge. With the recent series of crises, scandals and/or events, we now are, indeed, witnessing this new narrative: the null set narrative.

Consider, if you will, the current plight of one Jay Carney.

It is always interesting how one’s attributes can be used to praise or condemn depending on the narrative in which they are described.

However, this is a narrative that can fit around any news, story or scandal; more to the point, it is completely irrelevant to the words ensconced within it. Any words, anytime, anywhere. This is the narrative of choice for the administration at this point in time.

And now detached, aloof, and hands-off are the favored phrases in this administration’s null set narrative.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/the-administration/302749-obama-and-the-null-set-narrative#ixzz2UuzupYr7

 

Obama: du candidat super star au président mal aimé

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La couverture de l’élection de Barack Obama a été sans commune mesure avec les élections présidentielles de 2000 et 2004. Jacques Portes explique pourquoi le président des Etats-Unis n’a pas réussi à transformer ce succès planétaire en atout au cours de son mandat. Extraits de “Obama, vers un deuxième mandat ?” (1/2).

 

Third Debate: a Reverse ‘Rope-a-Hope’

Exclusive Analysis

Austin, Texas. October 23 — The President chose to go on the attack in the Third Presidential Debate last night; in a sort of reverse ‘rope-a-Hope’ strategy the challenger attempted to defuse the pummeling by not quite praising the President’s efforts but, rather, agreeing with him whenever it was even remotely possible. This was the Obama of 2008, though the pounding spoke less of hope and change & more of a desperate attempt to please his base.

For all the chest-pounding on the President’s side of the aisle, er, Spin Room, the fact remained that Obama was back in familiar territory of long sentences, a relatively high usage of the passive voice, with a lower reading ease, and attendant higher grade level scores. Once again, the higher use of the passive voice often is interpreted as attempting to evade ownership or shift responsibility. Obama’s use of passive was more than double his use in the Second Debate. Typically, a bellicose style does not win over the undecided, who seek to be more reassured than shouted at.

Romney’s numbers were remarkably similar during all three debates, which apparently reflects his steady, controlled, ‘gee willikers’-type personality, with a direct, if quaint, speaking style. This is a style of moderate-length, declarative sentences, with little use of the passive voice, and short, direct, and easy to understand words.

Both candidates were attempting to sound (and look) presidential and it was apparent that the second task was quite wearying. Holding back on Biden-esque smirks and Al Gore-ish disdain, feigning interest while keeping their talking points in mind, looked to take a singular toll.

Now the question remains if the Third Debate, along with a narrow win in the Second, is enough to unwind the havoc wrought by Debate No. 1, which introduced Mitt 2.0 (or even 3.0) upon an unsuspecting American electorate. Indeed, who knew that Mr. Romney could even affect let alone reverse his apparent off-course trajectory in a 90-minute span? Seldom has the course of a major American campaign change in a shorter amount of time. And seldom has a foregone conclusion, Obama winning an electoral landslide, collapsed as suddenly.

 

Not the Thrilla in Manila, but Certainly Nasty in Nassau

Austin, TEXAS. October 17, 2012. The President Obama of yore (2008, that is) showed up at the debate last night and so was hailed the victor. In fact, the numbers show that it was not that Romney faltered. He did not. Rather it was the President who recovered from his first debate ‘debacle’ (as viewed by his strongest supporters).

The numbers reveal the story. First, keep this number in mind: 7.4. This is the grade level of Obama’s most widely hailed speech, the “Yes, We Can!” Grant Park victory speech. ‘Yes, We Can!” is widely perceived as a classic to be enshrined in the American Oratory Hall of Fame along side Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream,” Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address,’ and Ronald Reagan’s “City on a Hill” speeches.

In the first Presidential debate, Obama’s grade level came in at 9.2. For a debate, with all its give-and-take, interruptions, pauses and the like, that was a rather high number. A Town Hall meeting is definitely not the place for the grandiloquent turn of phrase, especially when you are trying to woo the undecided citizens of the land with plain speakin’ — no matter how uncomfortable that might be.

We all told in sixth grade that a newspaper should be written at the sixth-grade level, which from the sixth-grade perspective can be quite a challenge. What this really translates to is short sentences, concise paragraphs, fewer polysyllabic words, and all written in active voice.

As an example, Joe Biden spoke at a sixth grade level (6.1) in the vice presidential debate and there were few who claimed the inability to understand Ol’ Joe. (Unfortunately, these tests do not evaluate facial expressions.) In last night’s debate , Obama scored 7.2 in the grade-level score, about 28% lower (and in this case better) than his first debate — and nearly identical to his Grant Park discourse.

Both Romney and Obama cut their used of passive voice nearly in half from 6% to 4% and 3%, respectively. Active voice, where the subject is the doer of the action, is always preferred over passive voice in political discourse since it can be used to avoid responsibility. (‘Taxes were raised’ rather than ‘I raise raised the taxes.)

Finally, Obama’s reading ease score improved over 8% from 63.1 to 70.1; Romney’s remained a bit higher at 71.0.

In champion fights, the unwritten rule is that you never take the current champ’s crown away on — points unless the victory is overwhelming. Last night the President showed up to fight, and thus is awarded the victory on points. So the Presidential Debate series now stands even at 0ne all, with the rubber (and deciding) match to take place next week.

 

With Obama’s structural lead, debate stakes couldn’t be higher

October 16, Austin, Texas — (Opinion) We have seen this all before in politics, in the board room, on the ball fields, and in life. The person at the top of the pecking order makes a misstep, seemingly minor, and then cascades into something major, and then cascades further still until it become calamitous — unless it can be stopped in time. Time is of the essence here. It must be squelched immediately, or sooner. And hopefully sooner still.

Perhaps it is ironic that one of the best examples was that of Mitt Romney’s Dad, George, in his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination back in the late ’60s. George Romney claimed that he had been ‘brainwashed’ by the U.S. military and diplomatic personnel on a visit to Vietnnam. “Romney brainwashed’ screamed the headlines. And that was all it took for his campaign to unravel.

Even a youthful observer could understand that Romney was using what in literature is known as synecdoche, where a part is used to represent something far larger. I have since seen this repeated scores of times in political confrontations of all types most recently in the Arab Spring. Today, we label this kind of support ‘shallow’ where a significant number of supporters are ready to abandon their candidate at the first instance that a viable alternative arises.

Could this explain what we saw in the aftermath of the first debate? It seems unlikely, but nevertheless could explain the remarkable transformation of the presidential contest we are now witnessing. I should note that it also doesn’t mean the the president will lose on November 6th. His lead is structural, both in terms of constituents as well as geography. There are many paths available for Obama to construct a electoral majority. For Romney the options are far fewer. Even if Romney’s momentum continues to build, there is a possibility of Romney eking out a slim victory in the popular vote, while losing by a far larger margin in the Electoral College.

The stakes in Tuesday’s debate could not be higher. For Romney the task is to build upon his momentum, for Obama it is to halt Romney in his tracks before he loses complete control of the race.

Paul JJ Payack, president, Global Language Monitor

A slightly different version of this article appeared on TheHill.com on October 15, 2012.

 

Malarkey Vs. Adorkable: The Vice Presidential Debate

Two words can be used to distill the essence of Thursday Night’s Vice Presidential Debate: Malarkey Vs. Adorkable.

On the one hand you have Joe Biden in familiar territory talking, interrupting, spinning, smiling feverishly to help the Democrats regain control of the political narrative after the widely perceived misteps of the president in the first Presidential Debate; on the other you have Paul Ryan, the wunder wonk, attempting to demonstrate 1) that he is NOT Sarah Palin, and 2) that he is more than simply a policy wonk and has the attendant seriousness, intelligence and skill set necessary to sit a heartbeat away from the presidency. Both succeeded in their appointed tasks.

Though Biden used the term ‘malarkey’ to describe Ryan’s debate performance, it was Biden who more closely typified the concept of ‘malarkey’ (bluster). Ryan did not stray too far from his policy wonk persona, but was fortunate that dorks, nerds and wonks are now in fashion. Hence the term ‘adorkable’ for ‘adorable dork’. In fact, The Global Language Monitor had named ‘adorkable’ as the Top Television Word of the Year just a month or so ago.

In terms of language usage, Biden used about 30% more passive voice than Ryan. Many believe that the passive voice is used to shade the truth, opposed to simple declarative sentences. Ryan and Biden both were relatively easy to understand according to the standardized algorithms coming in at 69.4 and 72.6 on the Reading Ease Scale. As for Grade Level, Ryan came in at 6.6, while Biden scored a 6.1. For comparison, Obama scored a 9.2 and Romney a 6.8 in their first debate.

(As a side note, Biden’s score (6.1) was the lowest ever recorded in a debate, surpassing Ross Perot’s previous low of 6.3).

 

The Final Narrative of Barack Obama

Austin, Texas. October 9, 2012 — The controversy swirling around Obama’s debate performance completely misses the point. For better or worse, this is it. Stripped of all pretension. Devoid of the catch phrases and the swoons. Minus the Hollywood glam. This is he. Barack Obama. The man, unadorned. No longer do we see Obama through a glass dimly. Now we see him for who he is. This is neither to embellish nor dis-embellish the man. This is to see things for what they are and not what they ought — or ought not — to be.

At the Global Language Monitor we understand that life is not an exit poll; we cannot shape the reality of how we just voted. It is a zero-sum thing, a binary action, a one or a zero, a yes or a no. In the same manner we have tracked the narrative of Barack Obama the preceding five years, stripped of all adornment, searching for the reality that was all too frequently, standing right before us, actually in our midst, if only we had the will to open our eyes to see.

Of course we have unabashedly published our findings along the way but at that time our findings seemed a bit out-of-step, as indeed they were. Out-of-step with the perceived reality, but in step with reality as it was. Unlike most of life, a new president is graced with a honeymoon period, when missteps are overlooked, forgotten, or forgiven. This is not the ‘suspension of disbelief’ that allows us to enjoy a fantastical story in the cinema but rather a ‘suspension of self-interest,’ where we put aside our partisan differences and wait. We wait for the cues and signals, both small and large, that will reveal the intentions, proclivities, and (dare I say it?) the character of the incumbent.

For some presidents this grace period is over nearly before it starts (Gerald Ford and George W. Bush come to mind). For others, it lasts a bit longer (George H.W. Bush), and for others longer still (Ronald Reagan). In the case of Barack Obama, the situation was markedly different. Being a black man, most Americans wanted him to succeed precisely because he was a black man. As a relative outsider, he was a welcome break from the recent past (and impending future) — Bush 41, Clinton 42, Bush 43, Clinton 44?

Being a newcomer, he was the classic tabula rasa, a blank slate upon which we could pour upon all our hopes and dreams. And change? Who on this planet did not want change from the preceding eight years: a divisive and disputed election, global terrorism and 9/11, two wars in the Middle East, a devastating tsunami, the inundation of one of America’s great cities, and to top it off, the global financial meltdown. All this being so, Barack Obama began his presidency with an extraordinarily large reservoir of good will. Let’s call this reservoir the Hope and Change Quotient (HCQ).

During Obama’s first days in office, the nation was engulfed in ‘anger and rage’? GLM analyzed the situation back in February 2009 and found that what was being reported as ‘anger’ was actually ‘frustration,’ while what was being reported as ‘rage’ was actually ‘despair’, a sense of foreboding or impending doom. GLM followed this rather odd undercurrent during the earliest, most hopeful, days of the Obama administration. The results were striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Obama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in. Some of the keywords showing heightened awareness were Abandoned, Despair, Desperation, and Fear — all appearing in the media with double digit increases over the pre-election period. This was perhaps an abberation we thought, but as we moved forward, the pattern continued unabated.

We saw a turning point with the Gulf Oil Spill speech. This was the opportunity to show the world how a US President would properly respond to a major crisis threatening the Gulf Coast, the ecosystem, and the forces of nature and the evil of Man (an arrogant CEO from Central casting, BP, Halliburton, and a 24×7 ‘Spill Cam’ spewing forth colorful filth, worthy of a Dreamworks 3-D treatment. And what did we get? We got what we had been measuring for the preceding two years: Obama 2.0, with an academic-sounding speech detailing a broad plan for an alternative-energy future and few specifics, and little of the hell-and-brimstone his followers had hope for.

By now it was becoming apparent for all to see. This was a changed and changing man, at least how he revealed himself publicly through speech. By time the 2010 Mid-Terms delivered their ‘shellacking’ the transformation was nearly complete. With a few noteworthy exceptions, such as his Tuscon eulogy,which ranked among his best, the President has appeared less-and-less engaged, more-and-more distant.

In July we noted that the top political buzzwords were telling a far different story than either campaign was presenting to the American people. Our analysis found that Bush was clearly assigned responsibility for the so-called Great Recession, while Obama was responsibility for the economy’s current condition, just as concern over Bain Capital and the ‘war against women’ were of less and little concern respectively. In other words, the American people saw the issues as if the virulent political ads of both parties did not exist. In contrast ‘Still believe the American Dream’ was No. 5 and ‘Disappointment in Obama Administration’ was No. 6.

At the same time, the Hope and Change Quotient has nearly been depleted, this being the normal course near the end of every president’s first term in recent memory. The President has finally been vetted. We now know the man, his strengths, weaknesses, and his proclivities. This is not to say that he will not win in his bid for re-election. But this is to say, that for better or worse, this is it.

This is the final narrative of Barack Obama.

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GLM used NarrativeTracker Technology in this study. NarrativeTracker is based on the global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what any audience is saying about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, the top global print and electronic media, as well as new media sources as they emerge.

Paul JJ Payack is the president and Chief Word Analysts of Austin-based Global Language Monitor

 

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Word ‘Christmas’ Stronger than ever in Global Media

Contrary to assumption that “Holiday season” pushing Christmas aside

Austin, TX December 23, 2008 (Update) – The Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has found that contrary to the assumption that the word Christmas is being pushed aside by more secular or politically neutral terms, ‘Christmas’ is used over 600% more than ‘Holiday Season’ in the global media. GLM compared the use of Christmas along with that of ‘Holiday Season,’ ‘Xmas,’ Chanukah’ in a variety of spellings, and ‘Kwanzaa’ (see below for the various spellings of Chanukah).

Since the 2005 season, Christmas has been used in about 85% of all global print and electronic media citations [2008, 84.6%; 2007, 85.5%; 2006, 84.1%; 2005, 84.1%].

In the global media, Christmas accounted for about 84.6% of all citations with Holiday Season following at 12.6%, followed by Xmas (1.5%), Hanukah (0.9%) and Kwanzaa (0.3%). On the Internet, Christmas led with 80.8% followed by Xmas (10.6%), Holiday Season (5.1%), Hanukah (2.5%), and Kwanzaa (0.7%). Note: The X in the word Xmas actually represents the Greek letter CHI, the first two Letters in the name Christ.

Festivus, the fictional holiday created during the hit Seinfeld television series, and Wintervale, sometimes used as a politically neutral substitute for the Christmas season were also measured with negligible results.

GLM tracked the words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The analysis also measured the global print and electronic media on its own. The results follow

Global Media Percentage Internet Percentage
Christmas 84.6% Christmas 80.8%
Xmas 1.5% Xmas 10.6%
Holiday Season 12.6% Holiday Season 5.1%
Hannukah 0.9% Hannukah 2.5%
Kwanzaa 0.3% Kwanzaa 0.7%
Festivus 0.03% Festivus 0.1%
Wintervale 0.00% Wintervale 0.001%
Total 100.0% Total 100.0%

“We thought it would prove interesting to see how the holidays are actually represented in the global media,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “We were a bit surprised to see that the much discussed secularization of Christmas in the media was nowhere as widespread as speculated.”

Various Spellings of Chanukah

  • Chanuka
  • Chanukah (Most common in US)
  • Chanukkah
  • Channukah
  • Hanukah
  • Hannukah
  • Hanukkah
  • Hanuka
  • Hanukka
  • Hanaka
  • Haneka
  • Hanika
  • Khanukkah

Added 12/23/09 (thanks to Steven Teitel)

For more information, call +1.512.801.6823 or email info@languagemonitor.com

 

Top Politically Incorrect Words of 2007-2008

‘Nappy-Headed Ho’ Top Politically inCorrect Phrase for 2007 Closely Followed by ‘Ho-Ho-Ho’ and ‘Carbon Footprint Stomping’

 

Henderson ,NV . March 21, 2008. ‘Nappy-headed Ho,’’ closely followed by ‘Ho-Ho-Ho’ and ’Carbon Footprint Stomping’ top the list of the most egregious examples of politically inCorrect language found in 2007 by the Global Language Monitor in its annual global survey. This year’s list includes words and phrases from the US , the UK ,Australia , and China .

“It is no surprise that a ‘Nappy-headed Ho’ was selected as the Top Politically Incorrect word or phrase for 2007,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). “A year later that phrase is still ricocheting about the Internet even affecting Christmas-season Santas in Australia.” The list was nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.
The Top Politically Incorrect Terms and Phrases for previous years include:

  • 2006: Global Warming Denier
  • 2005: Misguided Criminals
  • 2004: Master/Slave computer jargon

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2007:

  1. Nappy-headed Ho’s – Radio personality Don Imus’ reference to the women on the Rutgers University championship basketball team. ‘Nappy’ is ultimately derived from the Anglo Saxon hnoppa for the ‘wooly substance on the surface of cloth’. Combined with the word ‘ho’ — a derogratory term for women, Imus’ comments led to an uproar in the media and ultimately led to his resignation.
    2. HoHoHo — Staffing company in Sydney suggesting to prospective Santas to re-phrase their traditional greeting of “ho, ho, ho” in favor of “ha, ha, ha” so as not be confused with American urban parlance, a derogatory term for women.
    3. Carbon footprint stomping – The movement to flaunt carbon-intensive activities such as driving Hummers and flying private jets; a reaction to the Green movement is the height of political inCorrectness.
    4. Year of the Pig Restrictions – Chinese State Television in Shanghai warns Nestle against Happy Pig New Year ads, foregoing thousands of years of Chinese Tradition, because it might inflame pork-shying minorities.
    5. Three Little Pigs – according to the BBC, A retelling of the three little pigs fairy tale, called Three Little Cowboy Builders, was excluded from award consideration because judges said that “ the use of pigs raises cultural issues”. It was also found to “alienate parts of the workforce (building trade): “Is it true that all builders are cowboys, builders get their work blown down, and builders are like pigs?”
    6. The ‘Race’ Card – Originally a printed card with information about a thoroughbred horse race, now used in 2008 Presidential campaign parlance as in ‘playing the race card’, meaning intentionally injecting issues of ethnicity into the campaign. The word ‘race’ is ultimately derived from the Old High German for lineage.
    7. “Obesity Is Socially Contagious” — That was the widely reported headline in the UCSD press release announcing the results of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that actually came to the opposite conclusion. One of the study’s authors made it worse by stating “It’s spread from person to person like a fashion or a germ … once it starts; it’s hard to stop it. It can spread like wildfire.”
    8. Fire-breathing Dragon – Lindsey Gardiner, a leading British children’s author of the popular Lola, Poppy and Max characters, was instructed to eliminate a fire-breathing dragon from her new book because publishers feared they could be sued under health and safety regulations.
    9. “Wucha dun did now?” — Handbook distributed a Houston school district police officer to enable the reader to speak “as if you just came out of the hood”.
    10. Gypsy skirt – The worldwide phenomenon of the gypsy, tiered or Boho skirt has a new name: Traveler’s Skirt, since police in Cornwall believed that the term ‘Gypsy Skirt’ might be considered offensive to this cultural minority.
    The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.
    GLM is moving its headquarters to Austin , Texas in the coming months.

 

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

The Top Politically inCorrect Words for 2006

 

The Top Politically inCorrect Words for 2006

 

 

Macaca, Global Warming Denier, Herstory and Flip Chart Top Annual List

 

San Diego, California (December 13, 2006) Macaca, Global Warming Denier, Herstory and Flip Chart top the list of the most egregious examples of politically correct language found in 2006 by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) in its annual global survey.

“In 2006, the Political Correctness movement continued to gain momentum to the effect that many were unaware of the extent that it had inserted itself into ordinary English-language conversations,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over”.

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2006:

  1. Macaca – Might have changed the political balance of the US Senate, since George Allen’s (R-VA) utterance (which is an offensive slang term for Indians of the Sub-continent in the West Indies) surely has impacted his election bid.
  2. Global Warming Denier – Since there are those who now believe that climate changed has moved from scientific theory to dogma; there are now proposal that ‘global warming deniers’ be treated the same as ‘holocaust deniers:’ professional ostracism, belittlement, ridicule and, even, jail.
  3. Herstory for History – ‘Herstory’ again attempts to take the male element out of ‘HIS story’. Though there are nearly 900,000 Google citations for ‘HERstory, they are all based on a mistaken assumption. When Herodotus wrote the first history, the word meant simply an ‘inquiry’.
  4. Flip Chart. The term can be offensive to Filipinos, please use ‘writing block’.
  5. 1a and 1b — The headmistress of a grade school in Midlothian (Scotland) had to split a grade into two equal classes. Though the split was purely alphabetical, parents objects because those with children in ‘1b’ feared they may be perceived as academically inferior to those in ‘1a’.
  6. Politically Incorrect Colors — Staff at a coffee shop in Glasgow refused to serve a customer who had ordered a ‘black coffee’, believing it to be ‘racist.’ He wasn’t served until he changed his order to ‘coffee without milk’. Around the world we have reports of the word ‘black’ becoming emotionally charged and politically correct or incorrect depending upon one’s point of view.
  7. Oriental – Asian, please. Though this is generally a purely American phenomenon. In Europe, Asians prefer the term Oriental, which literally means ‘those from the East’.
  8. Menaissance – The rise of a ‘manliness’ culture or male renaissance. Replaces metrosexual, which evidently appealed to women but not men.
  9. Momtini — A Michigan mother invented the term ‘momtini’ as an act of rebellion against ‘parental correctness’. This has raised the hackles of child protection and ‘anti-alcohol’ groups.
  10. “Our Mother and Father Who are in Heaven” – From a new, ‘inclusive’ Bible translation (The Bible in a More Just Language) that replaces what it believes to be “divisive” teachings of Christianity.

Bonus: Political Correctness — ‘Equality Essentials,’ a 44-page training manual book called has been used for staff training courses at Kirklees Council in West Yorkshire suggests that the term Political Correctness is now politically incorrect.

Top Words for 2005 and 2004

The Top Politically Incorrect Words for 2005 were the BBC’s use of the euphemism ‘Misguided Criminals’ for Terrorists after the 7/7 Tube Bombings.

In 2004, the List was highlighted by Los Angeles County’s insistence of covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon.

 

Top Politically (in)Correct Words for 2005

 

 

Misguided Criminals, Intrinsic appitude, and Thought Shower Top List

 

San Diego, California (Updated November 29, 2005) Misguided Criminals, Intrinsic Aptitude, and Thought Shower top the list of the most egregious examples of politically correct language found in 2005 by the Global Language Monitor in its annual global survey. This year’s list includes words from the US, UK, France and Australia.

“2005 was the year we saw the Political Correctness movement become a truly global phenomenon,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). “The list is but one more example of the insertion of politics into every facet of modern life.”

The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.

Click here to Watch WCCO’s Video (Minneapolis)

Click here to Read and Listen to the Chinese Radio Int’l (CRI) Report

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2005:

  1. Misguided Criminals for Terrorist: The BBC attempts to strip away all emotion by using what it considers neutral descriptions when describing those who carried out the bombings in the London Tubes. The rub: the professed intent of these misguided criminals was to kill, without warning, as many innocents as possible (which is the common definition for the term, terrorist). The phrase was selected by GLM as but one example in line with the published BBC Editorial Guidelines where it is noted that the word ‘terrorist’ itself can be a barrier rather than aid to understanding. Suggested alternatives include: bomber, attacker, insurgent and militant, among others. These and similar words are deemed to have no emotional or value judgments. However, the word Terrorist can be used as long as it appears in a quoted attribution. [To see one example used by John Simpson, BBC World Affairs Editor, Click Here.]
  2. Intrinsic Aptitude (or lack thereof) was a suggestion by LawrenceSummers, the president of Harvard, on why women might be underrepresented in engineering and science. He was nearly fired for his speculation.
  3. Thought Shower or Word Shower substituting for brainstorm so as not to offend those with brain disorders such as epilepsy.
  4. Scum or “la racaille” for French citizens of Moslem and North African descent inhabiting the projects ringing FrenchCities. France’s Interior Minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, used this most Politically inCorrect (and reprehensible) label to describe the young rioters (and by extension all the inhabitants of the Cites).
  5. Out of the Mainstream when used to describe theideology of any political opponent: At one time slavery was in the mainstream, thinking the sun orbited the earth was in the mainstream, having your blood sucked out by leeches was in the mainstream. What’s so great about being in the mainstream?
  6. Deferred Success as a euphemism for the word fail. The Professional Association of Teachers in the UK considered a proposal to replace any notion of failure withdeferred success in order to bolster students self-esteem.
  7. Womyn for Women to distance the word from man. This in spite of the fact that the term man in the original Indo-European is gender neutral (as have been its successors for some 5,000 years).
  8. C.E. for A.D.: Is the current year A.D. 2005 or 2005 C.E.? There is a movement to strip A.D.(Latin for “In the Year of the Lord”) from the year designation used in the West since the 5th century and replace it with the supposedly moreneutral Common Era (though the zero reference year for the beginning of the Common Era remains the year of Christ’s birth).
  9. “God Rest Ye Merry Persons” for “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen”: A Christmas, eh, Holiday, carol with 500 years of history isnot enough to sway the Anglican Church at Cardiff Cathedral (Wales) from changing the original lyrics. There are those who suggest going one step further: “Higher Power Rest Ye Merry Persons”.
  10. Banning the word Mate: the Department ofParliamentary Services in Canberra issued a general warning to its security staff banning the use of the word ‘mate’ in dealings t with both members of Parliament and the public. What next? banning ‘no worries’ so as not to offend the worried, or banning ‘Down Under’ So as not to offend those of us who live in the “Up Over”.

HolidayBonus: Happy Holidays or Season’s Greetings for Christmas (which in some UK schools now label Wintervale). However, the word holiday is derived directly from Holy Day, and in the word X-Mas, the Greek letter ‘chi’ represented by the Roman X actually stands for the first two letters of the name Christ.) Now there are published reports of organization banning the traditional Christmas Colours of red and green.

Last year the Top Politically Incorrect words were: Los Angeles Countys insistence of covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon. Following closelywere same-sex marriage for marriage and waitron for waiter of waitress.

Australia bans the word ‘mate’

Australia bans the word ‘mate’

 

 

GLM’S Language Police suggest these others: ‘No Worries’, ‘Down Under’, ‘Barbie’, etc.

 

San Diego, Calif. August 24, 2005. Last week, the Department of Parliamentary Services in Canberra, issued a general warning to its security staff banning the use of the word ‘mate’ in any dealings they might have with both members of the Parliament and the public. Almost immediately, Australian Prime Minister John Howard called the ban “absurd” while the Opposition labeled it “un-Australian”. The ban has since been rescinded.

In direct response, the Global Language Monitor polled its readers (and enquired of itsLanguage Police) to come up with further suggestions of slang words and informal language that might serve the public interest by being banned in Australia. Earlier today, as a service to the international linguistic ‘mateship’ or community, GLM released its List.

“We believe that if the Department of Parliamentary Services had a list of “Further Slang terms and Colloquialisms fit to be Avoided, Shunned, or Otherwise Banned,” these are the words that would populate such a List,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and the WordMan for the Global Language Monitor. “To make the List, words had to be innocuous in themselves, but in the context of Political Correctness, potentially offensive to some segment of the populace”.

Recently, the BBC’s use of the term ‘misguided criminals’ and ‘bombers’ when referring to the perpetrators of the recent London blasts stirred an international debate on politically correct language. The BBC used those words to replace the term ‘terrorist’, which according to the BBC can “carry emotional or value judgments”.

GLM’s List is an ongoing compilation; currently the list of words to be potentially banned with associated commentary follows:

Barbeque — The shortened form, barbie, can be an invidious reference to the Barbie doll, and hence sexist.

Abso-bloody-lutely — Though the term bloody can signify an intensive, this use could also heighten insensitivity to the plight of farm animals that animal rights activists have long warned against.

Down Under — Down Under signifies the existence of an Up Over, which obviously is in the superior position of Uppness. Might be taken as ignoring the very real consequences of the North/South global divisions.

G’day — G’day is the shortened form of ‘Good Day’. Some etymologists believe that good can be ultimately traced to an earlier word for God. Hence, G’day could represent a conspiracy to insinuate the theistic world view into everyday life.

Mate — From classmates at male boarding schools. Obviously sexist, also elitist.

Nappy — Diaper, might offend those who illegally download music to their hard drives, and narcoleptics.

No Worries — This is offensive to those with OCD, and others who are plagued by constant self-doubt and apprehension.

Plonk — Inexpensive wine (in the US it’s called ripple). Plonk is perhaps a contraction of vin blanc; this might offend francophones.

Ta — Thank you. In the spirit International Harmony, the French s’ilvous plait is preferred.

Vegemite — A plot to foist upon a defenseless world, the supposed utopian ideal of what a meatless sandwich might be.

Zed — The letter Z. Not exactly slang, but a candidate for banishment nonetheless on general principles.

Nought — the number ‘zero’. If this caught on, the English-speaking world might finally have a name for the first decade of the 21st century: the Noughties.

To Read the Story from the Aussie perspective, CLICK HERE.

 

BBC Stirs Debate on Political Correctness

Filtering Events of All Emotional Content?

‘Terrorist’ Or ‘Bomber’?

.

 

San Diego, California (July 15, 2005) The BBC’s use of the term ‘misguided criminals’ and ‘bombers’ when referring to the perpetrators of the recent London blasts have stirred an international debate on politically correct language. The words replace the term terrorist, which according to the BBC can “carry emotional or value judgments”.

According to the Global Language Monitor’s exclusive PQ (Political-sensitivity Quotient) Index, the term ‘terrorist’ appears 700% more frequently on the web than ‘bomber’ when linked to terror-related activities such as suicide bombings, and the like. When tracking global news articles only, the word ‘bomber’ can be found in about 40% of the articles, though usually in combination with ‘terrorist’ or ‘terrorist-related’ words. The phrase ‘misguided criminals’ is found only about 5000 times on the entire web, many times linked to the emerging BBC story.

BBC guidelines state that credibility should never be undermined by the “careless use of words which (sic) carry emotional or value judgments”.

“The primary function of a news organization is to detail events as they occur in their existing cultural milieu, thereby recording the first draft of history. The BBC seems concerned with overstepping this boundary into what was once called yellow journalism. The greater danger here is to filter emotion-laden events of all emotional content in their pursuit of the non-judgmental,” said Paul JJ Payack, President (and the WordMan) of the Global Language Monitor.

The PQ Index is a proprietary algorithm that tracks politically sensitive words and phrases in the print. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, thereby separating the spin and the hype from the facts. The PQ Index is published quarterly.

Political Correctness Advocates Rail Against Western Calendar

A.D. 2005 or 2005 C.E.?

 

The Traditional Western Practice is to Reckon Time from the Birth of Jesus

 

San Diego, Calif. May 16, 2005. MetaNewswire. A small but vocal element is voicing opposition to the traditional Western practice of dividing time, measuring events as occurring before or after the birth of Jesus or B.C and A.D., according to a survey by The Global Language Monitor (GLM), using the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI).

The survey found that in the worldwide electronic and print media, and on the Internet, the current convention of A.D. and B.C. was found to be nearly 50 times as prevalent as that of the C.E. and B.C.E. convention. Nevertheless, the fact that the newer conventions were now found to be used at all indicates significant inroads, where until recently none existed.

The C.E. and B.C.E. conventions were introduced about a century ago in the Jewish and Scientific communities, but have been adopted increasingly by those who want to place some distance or obscure the Judeo-Christian roots of Western Civilization. The issue has become increasingly polarizing on college campuses, school textbook publishers, and in the various religious communities.

The Western Calendar is especially pervasive because all major electronic and computer systems have it deeply embedded in their basic instruction sets, or operating systems. This means that all electronic commerce, commercial applications, scientific, airlines, electronic games, automobiles, clocks, etc. are based on the Western Calendar.

“As with most language-based PC issues, the battle is intense, however, no authority or group can mandate linguistic change, said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “The fact is that both C.E. or A.D. both acknowledge the centrality of Jesus to the Western Calendar, (actually shorthand for Western Christendom), since both A.D. and C.E. both refer to the birth of Jesus as the time marker for the West.”

(In the aftermath of the French Revolution, the revolutionaries made anill-fated and short-lived attempt to restart the Western Calendar, which was to begin on September 22, 1792: the day of the declaration of the first French Republic. Months were cited by Roman numerals and named after meteorological conditions.)

Payack added, “Jesus, of course, was born in 749 AUC (ab urbecondita) from the founding of the City), since the Roman Calendar was dated from the mythical founding of the City by Romulus in 753 B.C. It is also interesting to note that when Dominus Exiguus, the 5th Century monk, created the current Calendar, he miscalculated, which is why it is now generally accepted that Jesus was born in the year 4 B.C, that is four years before the year of his birth.”

There are several major calendar systems in addition to the Western system currently in use. These include the Hebrew, Islamic, Buddhist, and Chinese.

The Hebrew Calendar dates from the Creation (current year 5765); the Islamic Calendar dates from the Hegira (current year 1425); the Chinese Calendar dates from the Emperor Huangdi, in 2637 B.C.; and the Buddhist Calendar dates from the birth of the Buddha, 543 years B.C., making 2005 the year 2548 of the Buddhist Era.

The Predictive Quantities Indicator is a proprietary algorithm that tracks specified words and phrases in the media and on the Internet. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. In this case, the words tracked were Anno Domini (A.D., literally Year of the Lord), Before Christ (B.C.), the Common Era (C.E.) and Before the Common Era (B.C.E.)

Top Politically Correct Word List of 2004

Politically inCorrect PCs

Master/Slave Tech Terms Raise Eyebrows in L.A.

.

Danville, California (December 4, 2004) Los Angeles County’s insistence on covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon, has been chosen the top example of political correctness in language for 2004 .

“We found Master/Slave to be but the most egregious example of political correctness in 2004,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “This is but one more example of the insertion of politics into every facet of modern life, down to the level of the control processes of computer technology.”

In computer networking terminology, master/slave is commonly used to describe a device or process that has captured (and involuntarily) controls one or more devices or processes. The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLMs Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.

The Top Politically Correct Words and Phrases for 2004:

  1. Device for master and captured device for slave in computer networking terminology
  2. Non-same sex marriage, for marriage used in Democratic Presidential Primaries
  3. Waitron for waiter or waitress
  4. Red Sox Lover for Yankee Hater during the ALCS playoffs
  5. Higher Power for God
  6. Progressive for classical liberal
  7. Incurious rather than more impolite invectives for President Bush (such as idiot or moron)
  8. Insurgents substituting for terrorists in Iraq
  9. Baristas rather than waitrons
  10. First year student rather than Freshman, though Frosh is still acceptable

Top Politically Correct Words (Russia)

Master/Slave in the Times of Oman

Master/Slave is the Most Offensive Term (India)

The View from The Ukraine

Computer Term Named the Most un-PC (South Africa)

The View from China

TechTarget’s Dictionary of Computer Terms

The View on the Controversy From Down Under

Master/Slave Most Politicially Incorrect Phrase (ABC News)

**************

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

#####################################################

#####################################################

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases … and it is logically consistent.

Einstein_1921

 

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’. Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

 

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence. For example, the Harvard Annex was founded in in 1879, some 243 years after Harvard College.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same reasons.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Heavier than air flight was highly unlikely if not impossible.
  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance (called the Aether).
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

Conclusion: ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution, if at all.

 

The Stonehenge Watch

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for the Neolithic Smart Set!

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Stonehenge 3

5,000 Years and Still Ticking!

 

 

What Exactly is Settled Science?

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • In 1888, the founder of the American Astronomical Society wrote, “We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy.”
  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence (See Harvard and the Havard Annex – Radcliffe).
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

*******

The Mathematical Basis of Yogi-isms

Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra, a Hall of Fame catcher during the heyday of the great New York Yankee baseball dynasty of the ’50’s, was known for his interesting way of constructing sentences. These became widely known as ‘Yogi-isms’. What has not been previously understood is the mathematical basis of his thought by Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, Global Language Monitor.

Read more

PAC-12 Upsets Big Ten for Top Smartest Reputation After Conference Realignment

 

 

Big Five Football Conferences

 

 

 

 

 

The Rankings: 1. PAC 12, 2. Big Ten, 3. SEC, 4. ACC, 5. Big 12

Austin, TEXAS July 29, 2015 — Some five years after what has come to be known as Conference Realignment, the impact on the academic reputation at highest level of Collegiate Athletics is becoming clear(er). According to an analysis performed using the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th edition, The PAC-12 now is the Top College Conference by Academic Reputation.

As you can see from the chart below, The PAC 12 toppled the Big Ten from the Top Spot, also leapfrogging the SEC and ACC.

 

Top Conf by Academic Rep 2015

Since 2008, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide has been ranking the nation’s Top 422 Colleges and Universities according to the values of their brands. Almost immediately, the Global Language Monitor, the TTMB publisher, began to see parallels between the value of a school’s brand and its perceived athletic excellence.

In 2012, GLM began a study of all the major football conferences at the time while looking ahead to the future changes then proposed. This was not necessary in 2015, since there are now only five conferences at the highest level of the game that matter:

• The Atlantic Coast Conference
• The Big 10 Conference
• The Big 12 Conference
• The PAC 12 Conference
• The SEC Conference

As before, the Patriot League and the Ivy League, two FCS conferences renowned for their academic prowess, are used as controls.

The analysis also gathered together the schools that have been overlooked by the Big 5 and hope to join one of them in a future paroxysm of conference realignment. The Select Seven schools include: Rice University, Tulane University, Southern Methodist University, University of Tulsa, University of Central Florida, University of Cincinnati, and the University of Connecticut. We treat the Select Seven as a separate conference for ranking purposes.

Highlights of the analysis:

The Biggest Winner 1 – The Pac 12 jumps over the Big Ten, ACC and SEC to the Top Spot. This was not because of the addition of Utah (Net negative) and Colorado (Net positive) with realignment, but rather because of the continuing strengthening of the academic reputation of the original PAC 10 membership. In fact, members of the PAC 12 occupied five of the top eleven spots in the university ranking.

The Biggest Disappointment – The Big 10, always an academic juggernaut only strengthened itself with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland. The addition of Nebraska was a net negative. Nevertheless, the Big Ten fell into the second position, only marginally ahead of the SEC and ACC. Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio State all finished in the top twenty of the university ranking.

The SEC and the ACC both improved their academic reputations over the last few years with the SEC bolstering its already formidable academic stalwarts with Texas A&M and Missouri. The ACC added two Eastern academic powerhouses in Pitt (founded in 1787) and Syracuse. The addition of Louisville was a net negative. Head-to-head, in the SEC vs. ACC contest, the SEC narrowly secures the win by a whisker with a last second field goal.

The Biggest Loser – The Big Twelve. Losing academic stars Texas A&M, Missouri, and Colorado while gaining West Virginia was a net negative. The Big 12, anchored by UT, a Top 10 academic school, now stands at about a third of the Academic Branding Power of the PAC 12 and Big Ten.

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the tenth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

About the Global Language Monitor

The Global Language Monitor is the publisher of the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valleyby Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

 

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

A commentary on Tiger Woods (and Mickey Mantle) by Paul JJ Payack, the Global Language Monitor, Austin, Texas

April 2014

For some time now I have been pondering the apparent decline of Tiger Woods.

Over his long career he’s been cut and measured against those of Jack, Arnie, and Sam (sometimes Phil) and, now, Rory, Bubba, and the other Young Guns.

But the comparison to which I keep coming back never played out on the links, or Amen Corner, or even on the hallowed grounds of St. Andrews or Pebble Beach, but on the barren ball fields of Commerce, Oklahoma and later on a particularly verdant patch of grass off the Major Deegan Expressway in the Bronx. Of course I am not writing of one of Tiger’s fellow golfers at all, but rather of The Mick, one Mickey Charles Mantle, of New York Yankees fame.

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)
Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

Both Tiger and Mickey achieved greatness at an early age, to herald the beginnings of long, illustrious careers — and both were destined for that type of glory, perhaps, never (or at least seldom seen) before. Both had peak performances a dozen or so years into their career, then they both continued showing flashes of brilliance, amidst the strongest of suspicions that their careers had peaked in their 32nd years. If their past were prologues — then their prologues had, indeed, passed.

I watched Mickey stumbling through those last painful years, tuning to the game every 20 minutes or so, to catch him lumbering from the batter’s box toward the plate, hoping against hope that he’d collect those few hits that would preserve a career .300 batting average, the last mark of greatness he had left to achieve.

Even then, I had done the math. If only he could finish this last season with eight more hits than his then-current pace he’d achieve his final, career capping goal, then vanishing before his eyes (and mine).

In that context, I have been watching, studying Tiger, since what might now be considered his consummate effort, playing virtually if not literally on one leg, gutting out one last brilliant effort high above the surf at Torrey Pines.

This is not to say that Tiger will never pass Jack in his long-sought goal, the grail of capturing his Nineteenth Major. But the story, like that of The Mick, has taken on many of the trappings of a neo-Greek tragedy.

He, like Mickey, heroes from afar, reach for (and attain) heroic status, they each evince their individual brands of hubris, exhibit an achilles heel (or two), engage in mortal combat with a cast of rivals nearly god-like heroes themselves.

For The Mick there was no Deus ex-Machina to intervene in the final act; for Tiger, the Chorus has yet to sing.

 

 

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

Read: Why the Flutie Effect is Real (Harvard Business Review)

.

 

Big Ten Tops, SEC Most improved

Both New Big East Conferences Tumble

 

Austin, TX July 4th Weekend – July 4th might be Independence Day, but July 1st, was Conference Realignment Day when dozens of college and universities landed in what they hope to be greener pastures. The Global Language Monitor, analyzed pre-2012 conference configurations and compared them with their new membership additions or deletions.

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

  1. The Big Ten continues to rank first in academic reputation.
  2. Ohio State was the top ranked school in the Big 10.
  3. The PAC 12 lost ground with Utah, but is now just slightly behind the ACC.
  4. If included in the rankings the academically renowned Ivy League would have bested the Big Ten and the Patriot League would be in a virtual tie with the Big Ten.
  5. The Atlantic Coast Conference was a close No. 2, pulling within ten percent of the leader.
  6. The Southeast Conference was the most improved after adding two academic stars (Texas A&M and Mizzou).
  7. Both the New and Old Big East (Big East and American Athletic) conferences fell by about 20% each
  8. The academic reputation of the Big 12 remained virtually unchanged, after taking the hit with the loss of Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado and A&M.
  9. The ACC gains with the addition of Pitt and Syracuse but will pull back a bit in 2014 with the addition of Louisville.
  10. The Big Ten will grow even stronger with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland.

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Misc. VII

Top Colleges Winter 2011

2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet “Brand Equity” Rankings

Wisconsin Tops Chicago and Harvard in Universities; Davidson over Occidental and Williams in Colleges

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Historic Re-alignment of what is considered an ‘elite’ school

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AUSTIN, Texas December 30, 2010 — The University of Wisconsin at Madison, one of the nation’s most storied land-grant institutions, leapt over Chicago, Harvard, MIT, Columbia and two-time defending No. 1 (and fellow Big Ten academic powerhouse) Michigan, as the Top University according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet analysis released by the Global Language Monitor.

There have now had three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin. As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten. Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, each moving up ten or more spots.

“The ‘flight to quality’ continues unabated. The savvy consumer of the education marketplace appears centered on the price-sensitive ‘public ivies’ and technology-centered schools, as well as on-line alternatives. The solidly performing ‘little Ivies’ are now now fairly well distributed across the country– and are holding their own,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.” One aftermath of the recent recession is that consumers understand that it is smart not to accept ‘retail pricing’ and that colleges are no different in this regard from any other institution.”

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of December with a mid-year snapshot, and the last day of 2009 as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 75,000 print and electronic media. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

The Top Twenty Universities by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Univ. of Wisconsin—Madison
  2. University of Chicago
  3. Harvard University
  4. Mass. Institute of Technology
  5. Columbia University
  6. Univ. of Michigan—Ann Arbor
  7. Cornell University
  8. University of California–Berkeley
  9. Yale University
  10. University of Texas—Austin
  11. Stanford University
  12. Princeton University
  13. University of California — Davis
  14. Georgetown University
  15. Duke University
  16. University of California—Los Angeles
  17. University of Washington
  18. New York University
  19. California Institute of Technology
  20. Johns Hopkins University

The Top Ten Universities now include four Ivy League schools, four Public Ivy’s (two from the Big Ten), one technological institute and the always formidable University of Chicago.

We have now three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three Years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin.

As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten.

Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, all moving up ten or more spots.

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Davidson College of North Carolina. This is the fourth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began which now have been represented by the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

Davidson, as well as L.A.’s Occidental College (where President Obama spent his first year in college) both leapt over the Little Three (Amherst, Williams and Wesleyan University) as well as all three previous No. 1’s: Carleton College, Wellesley College, and Colorado College.

The Top Twenty Colleges by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Davidson College
  2. Occidental College
  3. Williams College
  4. Wesleyan University
  5. Carleton College
  6. Amherst College
  7. Bucknell University
  8. Oberlin College
  9. United States Air Force Academy
  10. Pomona College
  11. Wellesley College
  12. Juilliard School of Music
  13. Vassar College
  14. Pratt Institute
  15. United States Military Academy
  16. Smith College
  17. Bowdoin College
  18. College of the Holy Cross
  19. Claremont McKenna College
  20. Bryn Mawr College

The Top Ten among colleges included Bucknell, Oberlin, Pomona and the US Air Force Academy. The Top Twenty included the Little Three, four of the former Seven Sisters (though Vassar is now co-ed), two Patriot League schools, two US Service Academies, the top Catholic College in the US (College of the Holy Cross), two of the Claremont Colleges, and two schools that are not included in the traditional college rankings: the Juilliard School and Pratt Institute, both in New York City.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are the only to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Design, Music, as well as Internet-based (and for-profit) All these were included in the College category with the exception of the online university, which was assigned to the University category.

In addition, the BOC notation signifies Best of Class; it is noted for those schools that are either first in the overall ranking, or first in a specific classification.

Top in the US/Best of Class (BOC) designation was awarded for:

  • Top University: University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Top College: Davidson College
  • Top Engineering Hybrid School: The Cooper Union
  • Top Business: Babson College
  • Top Art and Design School: Pratt Institute
  • Top Art School: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)
  • Top Music School: The Juilliard School
  • Top Online University: University of Phoenix
  • Top Christian School: Wheaton College, Illinois
  • Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross
  • Top Catholic University: Georgetown University
  • Top Service Academy: United States Air Force Academy
  • Top Outré College (New Category): Oberlin

The rankings also include the Biggest Movers for both colleges and universities and the Top States for Top Colleges.

The Universities that gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

  1. Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  2. Miami University—Oxford
  3. Lehigh University
  4. Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo
  5. University of California—Irvine
  6. CUNY-Queens
  7. Georgetown University
  8. Mills College
  9. University of Denver
  10. Rice University

The Colleges that have gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

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  1. Smith College
  2. Trinity College CT
  3. St. John’s College MD
  4. School of Visual Arts (NY)
  5. Fashion Institute of Technology
  6. St Lawrence University
  7. Swarthmore College
  8. Hampshire College
  9. Gettysburg College
  10. Oberlin College

In addition, each of the forty-two states with top colleges is listed with the combined rankings of colleges and universities within the state.

The top five states for top colleges, along with the number of top colleges within the states include:

  1. New York (45)
  2. California (30)
  3. Massachusetts (25)
  4. Pennsylvania (22)
  5. Illinois (12)

The 2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet Rankings contains all of the above information on the Top 300 US Colleges and Universities, with added detail.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

The 53 page guide includes the following:

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

GLM’s College Reputation Management Services are part of our TrendTopper Branding Services.

To learn more, click here.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

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For more information, call 1.512.801.6823

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

Why you need the TrendTopper MediaBuzz rankings

Simply put:

  • The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.
  • We are Up-to-date, as in, we are an on-going, longitudinal study. Our rankings are fresh, current and updated continually throughout the year. You will never need to wait until the first week in September to see how your schools are ranking.
  • We Provide Brand Analysis. Schools are either hot, or they’re not. We tell you how your schools rank, as brands. Every school on our list has made the cut! Every school is considered a good school, if not a great school.
  • We Measure Brand Equity; the perceived value of your school. Penn is a great (Ivy League) school, but Penn State (before the scandal) was nearly equivalent (No. 22 vs No. 24) in brand equity. After reading our report you can then ask yourself, is it worth the difference in price?
  • The World vs. The Deans. Other rankings are inherently biased. You need to stop and think – does my future employer really care about how other deans rank my school? Get real. The only question he or she actually cares about is can you do the work?
  • We continually update the Top 300 Colleges and Universities Guide throughout the year, so the information that you receive is always fresh and up-to-date.

We are Inclusive, listing Internet and Specialty Schools. It’s important to understand the rankings for Julliard and Cooper Union, as well as schools like the University of Phoenix, historical Black Colleges, and the notoriously underrepresented City University of New York. We even rank schools that opt-out of traditional rankings, such as Bard.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

How TrendTopper enhances college reputation by differentiating ‘brand’ among peers

The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year. The next Internet Rankings will be announced in April, 2009

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email pauljjpayack@gmail.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

 

Spring 2010 Edition

 

Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

.

.

Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

NY Named Top State for Top Colleges for 2010

Calif, Mass, Pa, Ill, Ohio, Va, Texas, NC and Minn follow

AUSTIN, Texas. (August 26, 2010) — New York state has been named the Top State for Top Colleges followed by California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Illinois. Ohio, Virginia, Texas, North Carolina and Minnesota rounded out the Top Ten. The list was assembled by the Global Language Monitor in its twice yearly TrendTopper Media Buzz analysis of the nation’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities.

“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. We survey social media such as Twitter, as well as the Internet, blogosphere, and the global print and electronic media.” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “As such, we remove the biases inherently built into each of the other published rankings. For example, US News recently announced that it has changed a key component to their rankings thereby lowering the value of year-by-year comparisons.”

The Top Ten States with the Most Top Colleges are listed below. Listings include Ranking, the number of top schools in parentheses, the Top University and College, National Best of Class Institutions and Top Surprises for each state.

Asterisks (*) indicate National Best-in-Class

State Rank
No. 1 New York (44)
Top College Vassar College
Top University Columbia University
Top Academy United States Military Academy *
Top Music School Juilliard School *
Top Design School Pratt Institute *
Top Surprise NY as the No. 1 State

No. 2
California (29)
Top College Pomona College
Top University University of California—Los Angeles
Top Surprise Stanford & UC San Diego top Berkeley

No. 3
Massachusetts (25)
Top University Harvard University
Top College Williams College
Top Business College Babson College *
Top Engineering School Massachusetts Institute of Technology *
Top Catholic School College of the Holy Cross *
Top Surprise Amherst falls out of Top 10

No. 4
Pennsylvania (22)
Top University Pennsylvania State University
Top College Bucknell University
Top Surprise Penn State over U of Pennsylvania

No. 5
Illinois (13)
Top University University of Chicago
Top College Wheaton College
Top Christian College Wheaton College *
Top Surprise Northwestern University at No. 39

No. 6
Ohio (11)
Top University Ohio State University—Columbus
Top College Kenyon College
Top Surprise Oberlin College Slips

No. 7
Virginia (10)
Top College University of Richmond
Top University Virginia Tech
Top Surprise VT over UVA

No. 8
Texas (10)
Top University University of Texas—Austin
Top College Austin College
Top Surprise UT breaks into the Top Ten

No. 9
North Carolina (8)
Top University Duke University
Top College Davidson College
Top Surprise UNC falls out of Top Ten

No. 10
Minnesota (8)
Top College Carleton College *
Top University University of Minnesota
Top Surprise Capella now No. 2 Internet School

.

The complete listings of all the states can be found here.

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

 

College Rankings Top 150 – Summer/Spring 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Colleges

Rank

1 Carleton College

2 Williams College

3 Pomona College

4 Middlebury College

5 University of Richmond

6 Wellesley College

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

14 Colorado College

15 College of the Holy Cross

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

18 Bucknell University

19 Reed College

20 Drew University

21 Harvey Mudd College

22 Davidson College

23 Occidental College

24 Skidmore College

25 Claremont McKenna College

26 United States Naval Academy

27 DePauw University

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

30 Barnard College

31 United States Air Force Academy

32 Furman University

33 Morehouse College

34 Macalester College

35 SUNY—Purchase

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

38 Colby College

39 Juilliard School

40 Lafayette College

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

43 Haverford College

44 Alfred University

45 Juniata College

46 Calvin College

47 Ithaca College

48 University of Puget Sound

49 Spelman College (GA)

50 Amherst College

51 Rhode Island School of Design

52 Siena College

53 Wesleyan University

54 Emerson College

55 St Olaf College

56 Bates College

57 Dickinson College

58 University of Northern Iowa

59 Knox College

60 Kenyon College

61 Pitzer College

62 Grinnell College

63 Austin College

64 Scripps College

65 Bryn Mawr College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

67 Oberlin College

68 Presbyterian College

69 Bentley College

70 California Institution of the Arts

71 Ursinus College

72 Bowdoin College

73 College of Charleston

74 Kalamazoo College

75 Augustana College

76 Connecticut College

77 Willamette University

78 Agnes Scott College

79 Rollins College

80 Simmons College

81 Fisk University

82 Sweet Briar College

83 Rowan University

84 Centre College

85 Coe College

86 Earlham College

87 Berklee College of Music

88 Wofford College

89 Denison University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

91 Beloit College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

93 Goucher College

94 Hampshire College

95 Swarthmore College

96 Berry College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

99 Rhodes College

100 Wittenberg University

101 Hobart College

102 Lewis and Clark

103 Berea College

104 Hartwick College

105 Manhattanville College

106 Lake Forest College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

108 California College of the Arts

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

110 New College of South FL

111 Sewanee—University of the South

112 Birmingham Southern college

113 Linfield College

114 College of Wooster

115 Allegheny College

116 Wabash College

117 United States Coast Guard Academy

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

119 Corcoran College of Art and Design

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Hood College

124 Elizabethtown College

125 Millsaps College

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

127 St Michael’s College

128 Gustavus Aldolphus

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 New England Conservatory of Music

131 Gettysburg College

132 Hendrix College

133 Smith College

134 Whitman College

135 Olin College

136 Guilford College

137 School of Visual Arts

138 Trinity College

139 Southwestern University

140 St. John’s College

141 College of New Jersey

142 Wheaton College MA

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

145 Susquehanna University

146 Westmont College

147 Lawrence University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

149 Hillsdale College

150 Bennington College

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available for $998. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

University Rankings Top 150 in the U.S.– Spring/Summer 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Universities

Rank

1 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor

2 Harvard University

3 University of Chicago

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

7 University of Texas—Austin

8 Princeton University

9 Yale University

10 Columbia University

11 Washington University in St. Louis

12 Cornell University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

15 University of Wisconsin—Madison

16 Pennsylvania State University

17 University of Washington

18 Duke University

19 University of Pennsylvania

20 Johns Hopkins University

21 New York University

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

24 University of Minnesota

25 University of Rochester

26 Michigan State University

27 University of California — Davis

28 Boston University

29 Purdue University

30 University of Connecticut

31 University of Florida

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

34 University of Kentucky

35 California Institute of Technology

36 Indiana University—Bloomington

37 University of Arizona

38 Rutgers, the State University of NJ

39 Northwestern University

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

41 Arizona State University

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 University of Southern California

44 University of Colorado—Boulder

45 University of Georgia

46 University of Iowa

47 Georgia Institute of Technology

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

49 Boston College

50 Georgetown University

51 University of Notre Dame

52 Tufts University

53 University of Pittsburgh

54 Emory University

55 University of South Carolina—Columbia

56 Vanderbilt University

57 University of Delaware

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

59 Texas A&M University

60 Dartmouth College

61 Syracuse University

62 University of Phoenix

63 Brown University

64 American University

65 Iowa State University

66 University of Missouri—Columbia

67 University of Miami

68 University of New Hampshire

69 George Washington University

70 University of Kansas

71 University of Oregon

72 University of California—Irvine

73 University of Oklahoma

74 University of Maryland—College Park

75 Loyola University Chicago

76 Tulane University

77 Washington State University

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

79 Case Western Reserve University

80 Kansas State University

81 Northeastern University

82 Auburn University

83 University of Alabama

84 Drexel University

85 Baylor University

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

87 Fordham University

88 Wake Forest University

89 DePaul University

90 Villanova University

91 Rice University

92 Brigham Young University—Provo

93 University of Vermont

94 Howard University

95 University of California—Riverside

96 Clemson University

97 Colorado State University

98 Chapman University

99 University of Tennessee

100 Brandeis University

101 University of Arkansas

102 Santa Clara University

103 Marquette University

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Southern Methodist University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 University of Dayton

109 Hofstra University

110 Lehigh University

111 St Louis University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

114 Pepperdine University

115 Gonzaga University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

117 Tuskegee University

118 University of Denver

119 College of William and Mary

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

121 James Madison University

122 Howard University (DC)

123 Kaplan University

124 Stetson University

125 University of the Pacific

126 CUNY-City College

127 Texas Christian University

128 Fairfield University

129 Loyola University New Orleans

130 Binghamton University

131 Catholic University of America

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

133 Elon University

134 Seattle University

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

136 New Jersey Institute of Technology

137 Stevens Institute of Technology

138 Colorado School of Mines

139 Capella University

140 Morgan State University

141 Truman State University

142 Evergreen State

143 Clarkson University

144 Mills College

145 University of Tulsa

146 Clark University

147 Rose-Hulman

148 Quinnipiac University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

150 CUNY-Baruch

152 Miami University—Oxford

153 Michigan Technological University

154 University of Dallas

155 University of Missouri—Rolla

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

157 Dillard University (LA)

158 University of San Francisco

159 Florida A&M University

160 Xavier University of Louisiana

161 Loyola Marymount University

162 CUNY-Hunter College

163 The Citadel

164 CUNY-Queens

165 University of Utah

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

Pomona College Ranked Sixth in Media Awareness

Pomona College is currently ranked sixth out of all colleges on The Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings.

The report, released biannually, ranks colleges and universities in terms of their presence in international print and electronic media. The report is meant to assess schools’ media awareness and global reputations.

Pomona rose from its position of 21 in the spring 2009 college rankings to sixth this previous fall. The top-ranked college was Wellesley College, while the University of Michigan topped the university rankings.

“During 2008-09, Pomona College was mentioned more than 2,800 times in print, broadcast, and on online news sites, a record for the nine years we’ve been tracking,” said Cynthia Peters, Director of Media Relations at Pomona College. (Read More.)

GLM’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities Spring 2010 Edition will be released Week of May 24th.

See November Rankings here.

Read more

First Internet-based College Guide Now Available

For Immediate Release

Top 225 Colleges and Universities Ranked

by TrendTopper MediaBuzz™

Austin, TX December 8, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced the immediate availability of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings. Unlike other college guides, it is published twice a year, with spring and fall editions. This means that readers can make crucial decisions using information from near real time rankings. The data for the current edition is accurate as of November 1, 2009. The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site.

The guide uses exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz™ analyses of the nation’s colleges and universities according their appearance in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet throughout the blogosphere, and including social media such as Twitter. The GLM rankings are also the first to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Music and Engineering schools, as well as online universities.

“TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left or right-leaning professors, and all the rest,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor.“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.”

Institutions are ranked by overall presence, and how quickly they are moving over the short and long-term. In addition, the study reveals the actual scores that separate the Top 225 Colleges and Universities from one another. In addition, the schools are ranked by their position in their state.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

Since TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranks overall media awareness and strength of a school’s ‘brand’ or reputation, the Global Language Monitor included specialty schools, which were included in the College category with the exception of the online universities, which was assigned to the University category.

In the University category, the University of Michigan moved up three places to the top spot, while Harvard saw a decline in Media Buzz citations of some 20%. Other major movers include MIT jumping from No. 16 to No. 2 and North Carolina, another public ivy, movinginto the Top Ten, with California—Berkeley moving from No.10 to No. 6.

In the College category, Wellesley overtook Colorado College, Williams and Amherst to claim the No. 1 position, a first for a women’s college. Pomona College, one of California’s Claremont Colleges re-emerged in the Top Ten, and Eugene Lang College of New School University debuted at a very strong No. 9.

The Top Specialty schools listed in their categories as well as overall rank are listed below.

  • Top Business school was Babson College was the Top Business (67 overall, college).
  • Top Art and Design schools were Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) (27 overall, college), Pratt Institute (28 overall, college), and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (47 overall, college).
  • Top Engineering school was The Cooper Union (38 overall, college).
  • Top Music Schools were the Julliard School (50 overall, college), the New England Conservatory of Music (96 overall, college), and Berklee College (99 overall, college).
  • Top Online/For Profit University was the University of Phoenix, USA (37 overall, university).
  • Top Christian was Wheaton College, IL (16 overall, college),
  • Top Military Academies were the United States Naval Academy (20 overall, college), the United States Military Academy (48 overall, college) and the United States Air Force Academy (61 overall, college).

The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site. The cost is $29.95.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

English has become the first truly global language with some 1.53 billion speakers as a first, second or auxiliary language. Paul JJ Payack examines its impact on the world economy, culture and society in A Million Words and Counting (Citadel Press, New York, 2009).

The current estimate for the number of words in the English Language stands at 1,002,116.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, send email to info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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University Rankings Top 125 – Fall 2009

The Top 125 Universities ranked by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

Return to main College Rankings page.

 

 

Universities
Rank
1 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, MI
2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA
3 Harvard University, MA
4 Columbia University, NY
5 University of Chicago, IL
6 University of California-Berkeley, CA
7 University of Wisconsin-Madison , WI
8 Stanford University, CA
9 University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, NC
10 Cornell University, NY
11 Yale University, CT
12 Princeton University, NJ
13 University of Pennsylvania, PA
14 University of California-Los Angeles, CA
15 University of Washington, WA
16 University of Minnesota, MN
17 New York University, NY
18 University of California-San Diego, CA
19 Johns Hopkins University, MD
20 Ohio State University-Columbus, OH
21 University of Virginia, VA
22 U. of California, Davis, CA
23 Georgia Institute of Technology, GA
24 Duke University, NC
25 Boston University, MA
26 University of Texas-Austin, TX
27 University of Florida, FL
28 University of California-Santa Barbara, CA
29 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, IL
30 Boston College, MA
31 U. of California, Irvine, CA
32 University of Georgia, GA
33 Northwestern University, IL
34 Pennsylvania State University, PA
35 Rutgers University, NJ
36 Purdue University, IN
37 University of Phoenix, AZ
38 University of Southern California, CA
39 University of Pittsburgh, PA
40 SUNY Stony Brook, NY
41 University of Indiana–Bloomington, IN
42 University of Iowa, IA
43 California Institute of Technology, CA
44 Georgetown University, DC
45 Brown University, RI
46 Washington University in St. Louis, MO
47 Syracuse University, NY
48 George Washington University, DC
49 University of Connecticut, CT
50 Texas A&M University, TX
51 Emory University, GA
52 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY
53 Vanderbilt University,TN
54 The Citadel, SC
55 University of Notre Dame, IN
56 Case Western Reserve, OH
57 University of Colorado–Boulder, CO
58 Carnegie Mellon University, PA
59 University of Arizona, AZ
60 University of Nebraska–Lincoln, NB
61 Dartmouth College, NH
62 University of Miami, FL
63 University of Rochester, NY
64 University of Maryland-College Park, MD
65 Tufts University, MA
66 American University, DC
67 Michigan State University
68 Clemson University, SC
69 Brigham Young University, UT
70 Auburn University, AL
71 Rice University, TX
72 Tulane University, LA
73 University of Delaware, DE
74 University of Kansas
75 Fordham University, NY
76 Baylor University, TX
77 Lehigh University , PA
78 SUNY Buffalo, NY
79 Virginia Tech, VA
80 Southern Methodist University, TX
81 University of Oklahoma, OK
82 Miami University, OH
83 New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ
84 Wake Forest University, NC
85 University of Missouri–Columbia, MO
86 Brandeis University, MA
87 Marquette University, WI
88 Santa Clara University, CA
89 North Carolina State University, NC
90 Loyola Marymount, CA
91 Northeastern University, MA
92 Florida State University, FL
93 College of William and Mary, VA
94 University of San Diego. CA
95 Providence College, RI
96 CUNY Queens College, NY
97 College of New Jersey, NJ
98 Iowa State University, IA
99 Villanova University, PA
100 Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
101 CUNY Brooklyn College, NY
101 James Madison, VA
102 SUNY Purchase, NY
103 Creighton University, NE
104 Texas Christian University, TX
105 Yeshiva University, NY
106 Drexel University, PA
107 Pepperdine University, CA
108 Stevens Institute of Technology, NJ
109 SUNY Binghamton, NY
110 SUNY Albany, NY
111 Drake University, IA
112 University of Vermont, VT
113 CUNY Baruch College, NY
114 SUNY Albany, NY
115 University of Redlands, CA
116 University of Tulsa, OK
117 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA
118 Butler University, IN
119 Gonzaga University, WA
120 Valpariso University, IN
121 Bradley University, IL
122 Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CA
123 CUNY City College, NY
124 Xavier University, LA

 

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New York Takes Top Global Fashion Capital Title from London, edging past Paris

The Global Language Monitor’s 10th Annual Survey

 The Difference between New York and Paris was 0.05%    And No. 4?  Los Angeles! Yes, LA.

February Fashion Weeks, 2014 New York and Austin, Texas — New York was reclaimed the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital from London, which had held the tile for 2011 and 2012.  Paris, which also won the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture, finished in the No. 2 spot overall.  New York and Paris were separated by 0.05%, the closest in the 10-year history of the Global Language Monitor’s survey.   In another development, Los Angeles moved into the esteemed Big  Four status, moving up five spots from 2012.

Coming Later in 2014:  The Global Fashion Capital Institute

Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan

. The rest of the Top Ten included:  Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.    Berlin solidified its position, while Antwerp completed it steady climb, Sydney had a triumphal return, and Shanghai returns to what many consider its rightful place in the Top Ten.   Asia was well represented with Tokyo (11), Singapore (19), and Hong Kong (20) in the Top Twenty.  “New York City has, indeed, earned its Top Global Fashion Capital ranking through its disciplined, methodical yet creative approach to its fashion industry.” said Bekka Payack, New York-based Fashion Director  for The Global Language Monitor.

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                                                                                                            Read Vanessa Friedman for a UK point of view.

“Paris, with the Top Haute Couture ranking, of course has a centuries-long heritage, having invented the very concept, also scored highly in the pret-a-porter category.  This year’s rankings also demonstrate the creative energy that is emerging worldwide in terms of fashion as a jobs, income and wealth generator, not to mention the prestige associated with exporting your fashion sense to the world.”

 

Read About the Top US Fashion Economic Powerhouses in AtlanticCities

 

Paris Fashion Globe
London Fashion Traffic by Big Ben

. The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format:  Position, City, Change from 2012, and comment.

  1. New York (+1) — The Big Apple is back on top of the fashion world by slipping past Paris by .5%.
  2. Paris (+2) — The Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture is surprisingly strong in pret-a-porter, also.
  3. London (-2) — London has enjoyed a fabulous two-year run and is now secure in its place in the top echelon for global fashion.
  4. Los Angeles (+5) — Zut alors! Tinsel Town in the Top Four? The result of the melding of the Red Carpet, the Industry (film, of course), and West Coast cool.
  5. Barcelona (-2)  —  Espana, again, places two Fashion Capitals in the Top Fifteen.  Barcelona also wins the Top Fashion Capital for Swimwear.
  6. Rome (0) — Rome may have Seven Hills but Italy now has Three Fashion Capitals (and Milan is No. 2).
  7. Berlin (+3)  — Berlin continues its steady rise moving deeper into the the elite ranks.
  8. Sydney (+7)  —  Sydney towers over OZ distancing (and distinguishing) itself, once again, from Melbourne.
  9. Antwerp (+2)  — Ah Antwerp, reverberations of the avant garde Antwerp Six continues into the 21st century.
  10. Shanghai (+12) —  As China further emerges onto the world stage, Shanghai leads the fashion charge.
  11. Tokyo (+9) — Tokyo made a leap in 2013 that many consider long overdue.
  12. Milano (-4)  —  Milan was the Top Global Fashion Capital back in 2009 and remains a strong contender for the top spot year-after-year.
  13. Florence (+3)  — Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli — A proud heritage to a thriving fashion industry in 2013.
  14. Madrid (-9) —  Still strong in 2013,  further cementing its place among the elite Fashion Capitals.
  15. Sao Paulo (-8)  — Again, the Queen of Latin American Fashion Capitals.
  16. St. Petersburg (+35)  —  Russian comes into 2014 with two Fashion Capitals in the Top Twenty, with Petrograd surprising  Moscow.
  17. Moscow (+18)  —  Apparently a rising tide does, indeed, raise all ships as Moscow comes back strong from 2012.
  18. Singapore (+1)  —  Basically standing in place (and a good  place to stand) but now trailing both Shanghai and Tokyo.
  19. Miami (+20)  —  Miami is, indeed, more than swimwear; and the fashion world apparently recognizes it
  20. Hong Kong (-8)  —  Down another eight spots this year but still a strong global presence.
  21. Prague (+24)  —  Prague continues its well-deserved ascension up the Fashion Capital ladder.
  22. New Delhi (+26)  —  A major move for Delhi, the result of ‘sticking to the knitting’ (its traditional strengths) and focusing on them.
  23. Krakow (+10)  —  Krakow continues it curious and continuous expansion of influence.
  24. Warsaw (+19)  —  Warsaw, too, is finding its stride as a major regional player.
  25. Dallas (+21)  —  The Big D is now the top US regional Fashion Capital.
  26. Melbourne (-5)  —  Still solid but falling further behind Sydney in the race for the OZ title.
  27. Cape Town (+27)  —  In a major surprise, Cape Town leaps over Jo-burg or, rather, Jo-burg falls behind the Mother City.
  28. Rio de Janeiro (-11)  —  Rio, which has the upcoming World Cup and Summer Olympics in 2016, needs to keep pace with Sao Paulo.
  29. Chicago (+21)  —  The City of Big Shoulders continues to reach out as a global fashion contender.
  30. Buenos Aires (-17)  —  Buenos Aires’s native-born son, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, has won a major fashion award, as the city itself flourishes as a regional Fashion Capital
  31. Dubai (-3)  — A burgeoning global presence and the No. 1 Fashion Capital in the Middle East.
  32. Toronto (+21)  —  Makes a major move to take the lead in Canada, over Toronto (by one) and Montreal (by 15).
  33. Vancouver (-2)  —  VanCity is developing its own, distinctive fashion sense, finding admirers the world over.
  34. Las Vegas (-10)  —  Las Vegas is attempting to build a brand-new fashion infrastructure.
  35. Amsterdam (-8)  — Creative impulses continue to flow outward from the Netherlands.
  36. Stockholm  (-4)  —  Stockholm is now the Nordic Fashion Capital, with good reason.
  37. Johannesburg (-19)  — Jo-burg, continues in its role as a major regional center influencer.
  38.  ienna (-1)  —  The ancient imperial citadel continues to exert its classic fashion sense.
  39. Bali (-25)  —  Bali is a serious Fashion Capital for Swimwear, a strong annual contender.
  40. Boston ( 4)  —  Boston brings a classic sense of traditional American design with flashes of innovation.
  41. Mexico City (+6)  —  Finding its footing as a major Latin American Fashion Capital
  42. Houston (+7)  —  One of the three Texas cities to emerge in recent years.
  43. Copenhagen (-13)  —  Copenhagen and Stockholm continue to contend for leadership in the Nordic World.
  44. Monaco (-19)  —  Monte Carlo is, well, Monte Carlo.
  45. Mumbai (-7)  —  Over the last few years Delhi has surpassed Mumbai as the Fashion Capital of the Subcontinent.
  46. Atlanta (+9)  —  Atlanta, is now the Fashion Capital, as well as the Capital of the New South.
  47. Santiago (-21)  —  A solid, yet idiosyncratic, fashion presence in the sphere of Latin American Fashion.
  48. Montreal (+4)  —  An Old World presence in a thriving New World metropolis.
  49. Caracas (-26)  —  Working hard to maintain its traditional yet advanced fashion sensibilities.
  50. San Francisco (-9)  —  Continues to thrive as one of the two centers of outre (and odd) fashion in the US.
  51. Abu Dhabi (-11)  —  There are more vibrant outposts of fashion that are contending to replace Abu Dhabi on this list.
  52. Bangkok  (-23)  — Bangkok’s  fashion reputation reflected the decline of civil order  in Thailand
  53. Austin (-11)  —  The other thriving center of outre (and odd) fashion in the US.
  54. Frankfurt (-18)  —  Berlin’s towering  fashion stature overshadows Franfurt am Main.
  55. Seoul (-21)  —  The emerging Fashion Capital continues to build on its distinctive sense of Asian style.
  56. The Watch List for 2014 includes: Auckland, Beirut, Jakarta, Kuala Lampur, Tel Aviv, and a number of cities in Africa.Top Fashion Capitals by Region Europe:  Paris, London, Rome, Barcelona, Berlin, Antwerp, Milano, Florence, Madrid, Monaco, Amsterdam,  Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Frankfurt.India: New Delhi, MumbaiAustralia: Sydney, MelbourneAsia: Shanghai, Hong Kong, Singapore, Singapore, Bali

    RSA:  Cape Town, Johannesburg

    Middle Europe:  St Petersburg, Moscow, Prague, Vienna, Krakow, Warsaw

    Canada:  Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal

    Mideast:  Dubai, Abu Dhabi

    Iberia:  Barcelona, Madrid

    Latin America: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janerio, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Santiago, Caracas

    Regional US:  New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Dallas,  Chicago, Las Vegas, Boston, Houston,  Atlanta, San Francisco, Austin

    About the Global Language Monitor This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.

    The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

Read the Global Language Monitor in 28 Languages

April 11, 2010 Aspen, Colorado,  You can now read the Global Language Monitor in twenty-eight languages through the Mojofiti family of blogs.



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No noising, please.

BMW Group Award für Interkulturelles Engagement Aktuell
To read this article in German (and 27 other languages) go to our sister site, Mojofiti.

No noising, please.

Vor kurzem erzielte die englische Sprache einen Weltrekord. Mehr als eine Million Wörter umfasst das Englische nun, laut dem in Austin (Texas) ansässigen Global Language Monitor (GLM), einer Institution, die seit 1999 die Anzahl der Wörter in der englischen Sprache zählt. Zum Vergleich: Die spanische Sprache umfasst etwa 275.000 Wörter, Französisch gerade einmal 100.000.
„Englisch ist eine offene Sprache und absorbiert Wörter sehr schnell“, so der Linguist, Wortanalyst und Gründer des GLM Paul Payack. „Die Franzosen sagen nicht Computer sondern L’Ordinateur. Amerikaner haben kein Problem mit Wörtern wie ‚Kindergarten‘ oder ‚Croissant‘. Sogar ‚Ketchup‘, die Bezeichnung für ein urtypisches amerikanisches Produkt, ist eigentlich ein Wort aus dem Kantonesischen.“

Durch die weltweite Verbreitung der englischen Sprache, erst durch das britische Empire und später durch die von den USA vorangetriebene Globalisierung, hat sich die Aufnahme neuer Wörter noch beschleunigt, so Payack.

Eine noch fundamentalere Evolution erlebt die Sprache jedoch durch die Entkopplung der englischen Muttersprachler von der Verwendung „ihrer“ Sprache. „Wenn sich ein Chinese und ein Franzose unterhalten, dann höchstwahrscheinlich auf Englisch“, erklärt Payack. „Englische Muttersprachler sind daran gar nicht mehr beteiligt. Nun reden diese beiden aber natürlich kein Oxford-Englisch, sondern eine sehr regional geprägte Variante des Englischen: Der Chinese fügt vielleicht am Ende einer Frage ein typisches chinesisches Fragewort wie „ma“ ein und der Franzose benutzt französischen Satzbau.“

So entsteht beispielsweise das Phänomen des sogenannten „Chinglish“ oder „Spanglish“, Mischungen aus dem Englischen und Chinesischen oder Spanischen. Neben neuen Wörtern wie „no noising“ statt „quite please“ oder „airline pulp“ für „airline food“, entstehen so auch ganz neue Sprachstrukturen. Die pure Menge der Nichtmuttersprachler, die Englisch in ihrem täglichen Leben verwenden, ist zu einer treibenden Kraft in der Entwicklung der Sprache geworden. Dieser Prozess führt zur Entstehung einer Spielart des Englischen, die man zum Beispiel auf internationalen Tagungen oder anderen Gelegenheiten beobachten kann, bei denen viele Nichtmuttersprachler gemeinsam auf Englisch kommunizieren. „An Universitäten und in Unternehmen auf der ganzen Welt und vor allem im Internet: Überall und zu jeder Zeit wird englisch von zahllosen Nichtmuttersprachlern gesprochen. Das führt mit Sicherheit zur größten Evolution, die die englische Sprache jemals erlebt hat”, so Payack. „Auch wenn das sehr lange dauern würde, ein solcher Prozess könnte sogar zur Entstehung einer vollkommen neuen Weltsprache führen.“

Solche Szenarien, die konservative Sprachschützer in den Wahnsinn treiben würden, lassen Sprachforscher wie Paul Payack jedoch kalt. Im Gegenteil: Payack begrüßt den Wandel. „Wir haben keine Institutionen die bestimmen, so wird Englisch gesprochen und so nicht. Die englische Sprache bleibt flexibel und kann sich der Zeit anpassen. Ich denke, das ist auch besser so.“

Webseite des „Global Language Monitor“:
https://www.languagemonitor.com



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Part Two: The Unraveling Begins — The Mid-term Elections of 2010

End of Part One

Part Two: The Unraveling Begins — The Mid-term Elections of 2010

We pick up the story with the Mid-terms of 2010 rapidly approaching. The nation is beginning to better understand its new president. Unlike his immediate predecessors, President Obama has never been properly vetted. at least not in the way that Bush 43 and 41, were and Al Gore and Bob Dole had been.

By 2010, people began to understand that Barack Obama was more than a self-made man: Obama was a self-defined man. As a self-defined man, much of the traditional vetting provided by the media was compressed into a number of months, and much of that was taken directly from Obama’s autobiographies, “Dreams from My Father” and “The Audacity of Hope”. And so we are back to the self-defined man, to a large extent, vetting himself.

And so it is none too surprising that many of the buzzwords surrounding the midterms are about Obama as a man, a person, a personality.

Comparing data from just before the 2008 general election, we see much the same patterns as today. Citations about Obama’s religion, his supposed “aloofness,” and even his smoking were much higher than what we had seen for other candidates (Bush, Kerry, Gore, etc.) in the previous two election cycles.

What we are seeing in the data appears to be a continuation of the process that ordinarily would have been ongoing for a decade or more. So the public vetting of the president continues on the Internet, in the blogs, throughout social media, and in the print and electronic media itself.

Paul JJ Payack

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This MetaThought Commentary was written by Paul JJ Payack, commentator, author, speaker and Big Data Analyst, and president of both the ThoughtTopper Institute and the Global Language Monitor.

You have permission to publish this work as long as proper attribution accompanies the copy since it is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

MetaThought Commentary is a service of the ThoughtTopper Institute.

For more information call 1.512.801.6823.




The Internet’s Fury Scorned

Obama Oval Office speech analysis provokes unprecedented response


Austin, Texas, July 2, 2010.  The first decade of the 21st century has witnessed a great many terrible, sad and historical events, with a few, unfortunately fleeting moments of great joy sprinkled between the dirges.  We have done our best to analyze the impact of these events on the global print and electronic media as well as on the Internet, throughout the blogosphere, and now the emerging social media.

After analyzing political speeches for a decade now, as well as all 55 Presidential Inaugural Addresses and transcripts of historical interest (including Washington’s Farewell Address, the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, FDR’s ‘Live in Infamy’ radio address, Martin Luther King’s ‘I have a Dream’ speech) you would think that we had seen and heard everything by now.

However, it wasn’t until our analysis of the President’s Gulf Spill Oval Office address, that we experienced the full force of the Internet’s fury scorned.

And this for an analysis that we considered basically non-newsworthy.

President Obama had given yet another address to the nation.  GLM used the same standardized, widely available, language tools that we used to name Obama’s Grant Park  ”Yes, we can!” victory address as one that ranked with the greatest of presidential orations.  Now these same standardized, time-tested tools are being conveniently criticized as of questionable repute.

We were told that our analysis was either ‘bashing Obama’ or ‘excusing Obama’. At the same time, we were either ‘insulting the people’ or ‘insulting the President’. Finally, it was suggested that we were rather transparently calling for the President to ‘dumb down the rhetoric’ so that one and all might understand  the superior intelligence of ‘his highness’.  Whoa!

Apparently, many readers never got over the headline, missing the actual analysis and what the numbers told us about the speech. Our concern was that our initial headline, Obama Oil Spill Speech Echoes Elite, Aloof Ethos might be considered demeaning to the President.  Wrong.  It was considered demeaning to everyone on the Left and the Right.

For general information on the readability tests used by GLM, click here.

For scientific literature about readability tests, enter Flesch or readability into the ERIC database.

We were surprised to learn that offense was, apparently,  taken in equal proportions by both the Right (Language Expert: If You Didn’t Like Obama’s Oil Spill Speech, It’s Probably Because You’re Stupid) and the Left (Obama Oil Spill Speech Criticized By CNN’s Language Analyst For Not Being Moronic Enough) of the political spectrum.   Nevertheless, we were quite amused by The ColbertReport’s send-up of our (and CNN’s) report, which somehow struck a middle chord.

It was also enlightening to see a significant proportion of this criticism to be ad hominem attacks, focusing on ourselves rather than our analysis.  (Read FAQ about GLM and Paul JJ Payack here.)

This past December, we encountered fierce criticism from the Chinese government dailies because  we named ‘The Rise of China” as the No. 1 news story of the decade.  (You can follow the narrative arc of this controversy here. )  But the criticism that accompanied the Obama Gulf Spill speech, was a good bit nastier, indeed.

Our analyses of the three preceding US Presidential elections were praised from many quarters from the New York Times to Nicholas Kristof to NPR to the worldwide media.  During the preceding ten years, few alleged political motivation, or denounced the standard language-measurement tools as inherently flawed. In fact, as long as readers basically agreed with the more predictable outcomes, there were few complaints.  Here were some of those results:  Ross Perot scored the lowest we’ve ever recorded, John F, Kennedy and Ronald Reagan were stars, both Bushes settled in the middle of the middle school years, and Obama’s ‘Yes, we can!’ speech had nearly equivalent numbers to Martin Luther King’s “I have a Dream’ speech and Lincoln’s ‘Gettysburg Address’.   So far, so good.  We did have a few outliers, such as Sarah Palin achieving quite a high score during her debate with Joe Biden, which was duly noted by New York Magazine and quite easy to explain.

Here’s what we attempted to communicate:

1.  Obama’s speech, though deserving a ‘solid B’ did not live up to his past efforts.

2.  Obama’s most well-regarded speech came in a at 7.4 grade level.  This is not talking down to the American people.  This is communicating clear and concisely to his audience.  This is Obama at his best, communicating with a deft combination of vision, passion and rhetoric.

In fact, our headline for that effort read: Obama’s “Yes, We Can” Speech Ranked with “I have a Dream,” “Tear Down this Wall,” and JFK Inaugural. Rather high praise, indeed.

Our commentary read:

Obama’s “Yes, We Can” speech delivered Tuesday night in Chicago’s Grant Park ranked favorably in tone, tenor and rhetorical flourishes with memorable political addresses of the recent past including Martin Luther King, Jr.’s   “I have a Dream” speech, “Tear Down this Wall,” by Ronald  Reagan and John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address.

“As is appropriate for a forward-looking message of hope and reconciliation, words of change and hope, as well as future-related constructions dominated the address,” said Paul JJ Payack President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “Evidently, Obama is at his best at connecting with people at the 7th to 8th grade range, communicating directly to his audience using simple yet powerful rhetorical devices, such as the repetition of the cadenced phrase ‘Yes, we can’, which built to a powerful conclusion.”

Well-regarded, indeed (and well-deserved).

3.   GLM and our predecessor site, yourDictionary.com have analyzed every presidential inaugural since that of George Washington.  The idea was, and continues to be, to look at the presidents’ words in the total historical context of the American presidency.

In 2001, we were quoted as saying,

Our goal was to spot trends that are all to easily overlooked in the political (and all too partisan) passions of the moment” [and continued that our] analysis included patterns of word usage choices, the use of such grammatical constructions as passive voice, the length of words and sentences, the number of paragraphs, and other parameters of language to gauge the content [including] the well-regarded Flesch-Kincaid Reading Scale.

4.  The use of Industry-standard language analytics.  The Fogg Index, the Flesch Test, the Flesch-Kinkaid Reading Scale, and many others, are used in all forms of publishing from technical manuals to ensuring proper comprehension levels for textbooks used for various ages and classes.  This has been true for more than fifty years.

The reason we choose to use the standard tests and analytical tools was a simple one:  to enable the same set of measurements over any period of time.  And also that these analyses could be replicated by scholars and historians and journalists the world over.

5.  We use our proprietary tool, the Predictive Quantities Indicator or PQI to measure media analytics, narrative tracking, and TrendTopper Media Buzz, as such we do not use the PQI for this task.

By the Way, here are a few historical precedents;

  • Washington’s Farewell Address of 1796 — 12.0.
  • Lincoln-Douglas debates, 1858 — Stephen Douglas’ seven speeches averaged a 12th-grade level 11.9; Lincoln’s averaged 11.2.
  • President Franklin Roosevelt’s declaration of war in December 1941 — 11.5.
  • Nixon-Kennedy Debates, 1960 — The first nationally televised debates:  Kennedy, 9.6 ; Nixon, 9.1.
  • Carter-Ford Debates, 1976 — Carter, 10.4; Ford, 11.0.
  • Carter-Reagan debate   — Carter, 12.0; Reagan, 10.7.
  • Reagan-Mondale debates — Reagan, 9.8;  Mondale, 8.7.
  • Dukakis-Bush debates of 1988 — Dukakis, 8.9; Bush, 6.7 grade.
  • Bush-Clinton-Perot debates of 1992 — Carter, 8.5, Bush, 6.5, Perot, 6.3.
  • Bush-Gore debate of 2000 — Bush, 7.1, Gore, 8.4.
  • Cheney-Lieberman, V.P. Debate — Lieberman, 9.9; Dick Cheney, 9.1.

And for good measure, Hamlet’s ‘To Be or Not to Be Soliloquy’, Shakespeare, c. 1600, comes in at 10.6.

Now Kathleen Parker has considerably upped the ante when applied readability statistics in her premise about Barack Obama as the first ‘feminine president’ ….



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Keep Presidential Speeches Smart

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Medialand

Trevor Butterworth, 06.22.10

Trevor Butterworth is the editor of stats.org, an affiliate of George Mason University that looks at how numbers are used in public policy and the media. He writes a weekly column for Forbes.

If the Gulf oil spill is a national tragedy, the arguments over President Obama’s response to it have descended into a national farce. When former law professors go looking for “ass to kick,” they end up looking like the eponymous hero of Kickass, a nerdy kid copying moves he’s seen in comic books. The difference is that the fictional Kickass was ennobled by failure, which, sadly, is not the kind of outcome open to the President of the United States in matters of national importance.

Obama’s mistake was to respond to the Rock’Em Sock’Em Robots of punditry. The country didn’t want Spock at the helm during environmental armageddon, they protested; the situation demanded a theatrically-appropriate response — as if the presidency was the background music to the movie of our lives, rousing in adversity, compassionate in suffering, a boom box of linguistic effects.

If style is the image of character, you cannot go from the calmest, most judicious intellectual in the room to a Schwarzenegger character in leather trousers and expect to be perceived as authentic. This is why responding to his critics was the wrong thing to do. By following their lame advice, by trying to be someone he isn’t, Obama sounded bathetic.

All of this is an object lesson in how democracy isn’t helped by the media. Just as an analysis of the Katrina response shows that it was a complex systematic failure of government and not a simple fumble by George W. Bush and “heck of a job” Brownie, the Gulf oil spill is not really in the league of a car wreck caused by distracted texting. The very intractability of the problem demands openness, an admission of complexity and a detailed description of solutions that are being pursued. And yet, according to one manufacturer of conventional wisdom, the problem was not that Obama’s White House address on the spill was too simple or vague, it was that it wasn’t simple enough. As CNN reported:

Obama’s speech may have gone over the heads of many in his audience, according to an analysis of the 18-minute talk released Wednesday by Paul J.J. Payack, president of Global Language Monitor. Tuesday night’s speech from the Oval Office of the White House was written to a 9.8 grade level, said Payack, who gave Obama a ‘solid B.’ His Austin, Texas-based company analyzes and catalogues trends in word usage and word choice and their impact on culture.”

The president’s 19.8 words per sentence apparently “added some difficulty for his target audience.” But 19.8 words is well within the breath of television’s cutthroat culture of political sound bites, which now stands at seven seconds. Indeed, as Elvin T. Lim notes in his brilliant historical and linguistic analysis of presidential rhetoric, The Anti-Intellectual Presidency, the average presidential sentence in recent years (as defined by speeches) has ranged from 15 to 20 words, well within the assumed attention span of the presumptive television viewer.

But now, even this is apparently too difficult for most Americans to follow. It gets worse. Take the following sentence from the President’s speech, “That is why just after the rig sank, I assembled a team of our nation’s best scientists and engineers to tackle this challenge — a team led by Dr. Steven Chu, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and our nation’s Secretary of Energy.” According to Payack, this is the kind of phrasing that makes the President seem “aloof and out of touch.” It’s too professorial, too academic and not “ordinary enough.” Perhaps the President should just have tweeted “I got smart folks fixin’ to fix the oil spill” and let everyone go back to their regular broadcast fare or communicating with each other in grunts and clicks.

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Obama Oil Spill Speech Echoes Elite, Aloof Ethos

When Obama is at his best (such as the Grant Park ‘Yes, We Can speech), the President has a direct and emotional connection with the American people.  This speech, simply, did not live up to that high standard — and the numbers reflect it.

Comparisons with previous addresses and those of other presidents

Passive Voice highest for any major presidential address this century

Surprisingly high tenth-grade reading (and hearing) level


Austin, TX, June 17, 2010 – According to an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor, President Obama’s Oil Spill speech echoed his elite ethos, with a broad plan for an alternative-energy future and few specifics.  The only specifics of the address were the continuation of the off-shore drilling ban, effectively putting tens of thousands of Gulf Coast jobs in jeopardy.  The President’s first Oval Office address came in at a surprising high tenth-grade reading level, with some 13% passive constructions, the highest level measured in any major presidential address in this century.  In political speaking, the passive voice is generally used to either deflect responsibility, or to have no particular ‘doer’ of an action

GLM on Obama’s ‘Yes, We Can!’ victory speech: Ranked Among the Greatest

See “The Colbert Report’s”  Send-up of GLM’s Oval Office Analysis

A previous analysis using GLM’s NarrativeTracker™, found the president’s primary narrative arc to be that of ‘Obama as an Oil Spill Enabler’.  Nothing in the address would appear to change that narrative, though formal analysis will be forthcoming in the next week.

Kathleen Parker’s ‘Empiracally Vacuous Meme-replication’

Alternet’s Dumbing Down of Obama’s speech to the seventh-grade level.

The Readability Analysis of the Oval Office address appears below:

  • Passive Voice — With some 13% passive constructions, the highest level measured in any major presidential address this century.  In political speaking, the passive voice is generally used to either deflect responsibility, or to have no particular ‘doer’ of an action, at least when speaking about himself or his Administration.  Otherwise, BP was the clear ‘doer’.
  • Sentence Length — Obama’s spoke in long, though well-crafted, sentences about 20 words in length.
  • Sentences per Paragraphs – Just below four sentences per paragraph.  Usually four sentences in a paragraph would be quite easy to understand, but the 19.8 words per sentence, added some difficulty for his target audience.
  • Characters per words – Obama’s words had an average of 4.5 letters in them, a bit longer than typical for him.
  • Flesch Reading Ease – Reading Ease came in at 59.1. The Closer to 100, the easier to read.  This is well within the normal range for Oval Office Addresses.
  • Flesch-Kincaid Grade-Level – 9.8 Grade Level.  This is the highest of any major Obama speech.  Obama’s closest match among recent presidents is Ronald Reagan, whose speeches generally ranged from the 9th to 10th grade levels.  (President George W. Bush usually spoke at a seventh grade level.)

Grade-Level comparisons with other speeches of note include:

Kennedy Inaugural Address       10.8

Reagan ‘Tear Down This Wall”   9.8

Lincoln “Gettysburg Address”     9.1

Martin Luther King: ”I have a dream”   8.8

Obama 2004 Democrat Convention      8.3

Obama Victory Speech “Yes, we can”   7.4

“The scores indicate that this was not Obama at his best, especially when attempting make an emotional connection to the American people,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of GLM.  “For example, the numbers are significantly different than the ‘Yes, I can” speech, which many consider his best effort.”

Read More:

How Obama lost control of the oil-spill narrative (Colleen Ross, CBC)

Keep Presidential Speeches Smart (Trevor Butterworth, Forbes)

Textbook Obama (New York Magazine by Chris Bonanos)

Obama Narrative 2.0 (GLM)

The President, the Spill and the Narrative that got away (Simon Mann, The Age)

FAQs about GLM, Paul JJ Payack, and the Million Word March



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Obama Narrative 2.0

Five Narratives Compete for the Title Tuesday Night


Austin, TX, June 15, 2010 – There are now five main narrative ‘arcs’ competing for the Obama Narrative 2.0 title, the underlying storyline that will largely define the president in the run-up to the Mid-term elections and, possibly, for time remaining in his term.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, found the primary narrative arcs in descending order of importance to be:

1.    Obama as Oil Spill Enabler – OK, he didn’t cause it, but in today’s parlance, he appears to be enabling the perpetrators (BP or British Petroleum).  It’s score was some fifteen times higher than that of No. 5, Healthcare Reform.

2.    Obama as the Big Spender – This is a good story line if your goal is to play to the left.  Independents and the right see it as far less favorable.  Spending is have ten times the impact as that of Healthcare Reform.

3.    Obama as the Chicago-style pol – Since the beginning of the year, this narrative is up 640%.  Good for Chicagoland, not so favorable for the rest of the nation.

4.    Obama as out-of-touch or aloof – Taking time to ascertain whose ‘ass to kick’ and calling in an ever growing number of academics to resolve problems usually left to Red Adair (or Bruce Willis) has resulted in a thirteen hundred percent rise in this narrative arc.

5.    Obama as HealthCare Reformer – The bloom is off this rose far more quickly than such a triumph would typically entail. It has fallen from the No. 1 position just a few months ago.

“As of this moment, Obama Narrative 2.0 will emerge far less favorable than that of 1.0:  the  Washington outsider, who will stare-down both Beltway denizens and Politics as usual,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of GLM.  “The Narratives emerging from this inexorably slowly unfolding ecological disaster are running roughshod over those earlier, far-more positive narratives the president is attempting to revive.

The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative. The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.

The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557, send email to pjjp@post@harvard.edu, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.



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Making ‘One Whole’ After the Spill

The Associated Press

By Cristina Silva, Saint Petersburg Times

Lambasted by charges that his response to the gulf oil spill comes across as emotionally flat, President Barack Obama has made repeated vows to stand by the victims “until they are made whole.”

His ambitious promise now stands as the rhetoric of choice among political leaders looking to sympathize with those affected by the environmental and financial crisis. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry and Gov. Charlie Crist have made near identical pledges and a trio of Democratic congressmen demanded oil giant BP postpone $10 billion in dividend payments to stockholders until “the people of the gulf (are) made whole.”

Problem is, what does it mean?

”That is the one question I have been asking for five weeks,” said Orange Beach Mayor Tony Kennon, who fears the sheets of oil sliding toward the shores of his Alabama tourist haven will bring new financial hardships after weeks of canceled hotel reservations and half-empty seafood shacks. “That is the one question we need to know before we can move forward.”

Politicians are well aware of the power of words.

Obama, a legal scholar with a penchant for headline-grabbing speeches, hasn’t elaborated on his definition of “made whole,” but his repetition suggests he thinks it is a good message. It means he wants to help. It means he cares. But, as with many political messages, “made whole” has more than one layer.

In legal jargon, “made whole” implies full restitution. A stolen laptop is replaced. Hospital bills are paid. A cracked windshield is repaired.

But the Gulf of Mexico crisis likely won’t be so easily resolved. Some losses could be hard to prove in court or even single out, creating a complicated web of cause and effect that might not immediately produce a culprit, said economic and legal scholars.

”What (Obama) said is true. They (BP) are going to be responsible for the damage they did,” said Fred Levin, a trial lawyer in Pensacola. “The question is, what is the damage they did?”

In other words, will those indirectly hurt by the oil spill be “made whole,” too? Or does the promise only apply to the victims who can successfully make their case in court?

Consider some potential ramifications. If affected business owners can no longer afford to send their children to private schools, should the schools file a claim? If the private schools hire fewer teachers because of declining enrollment, do the unemployed teachers get help? And if those teachers then can no longer afford to buy quality meat from the local supermarket, how does the supermarket prove its losses are tied to the oil spill?

It’s simply not clear, said Peter Henning, a former federal prosecutor who teaches criminal law at Wayne State University in Detroit.

”To the extent you are talking about just the cleanup, yes, BP is on the hook, but to the extent that you are saying we are going to return these communities to what they were, the law does not appear to extend that far,” he said. “While it is couched in legal terms, this is really more of a political promise than a legal assertion.”

Wordsmiths countered “made whole” is not an abstract concept.

”To ‘make whole’ means exactly what it says, meaning not to kind of prop you up, not to give you some aid, but to put you back precisely where you were,” said Paul JJ Payack , president of the Global Language Monitor based in Austin, Texas, which analyzes speech. “It is a very precise choice of words and they know it.”

BP so far has paid $49 million to individuals or small businesses through its claims process and sent out roughly 18,000 checks, spokesman Max McGahan said.

”We have said we will compensate individuals and businesses in full for whatever damages or loss of income has resulted from the oil spill. We have made that commitment very clearly,” McGahan said.

He declined to address the “made whole” pledge.

Read More in the St Petersburg Times



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Tracking the Gulf Oil Spill Narrative

Obama vs. BP, Exxon Valdez vs. Katrina, Biblical Prophesies, etc.

The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important since he who wins control of the narrative, controls      the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill.

Austin, TX, June 02, 2010 — In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, there are now several differing story lines emerging from the Gulf Oil Spill.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and othersocial media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

The Narratives emerging from this on-going (and slow-moving) disaster include:

· Obama was Slow to Respond – 95% of the social media conversations characterize the President Obama as ‘slow to respond’.

· Obama vs. BP: who’s in charge? — 52% see BP in charge of the spill. This may or may not be a political liability. Democrats need the blame assigned to BP; at the same time, Obama needs to be seen as in overall control of the disaster.

· Worst environmental disaster ever – 42% see the current spill the worst environmental disaster ever.

· Federal Response — 57% see the Federal response using ‘poor’ or related keywords. Not a good month for the Feds; come to think of it, not a good year for the Feds.

· Katrina vs. Exxon Valdez – 61% make the comparison to the Exxon Valdez; about 39% compare the ongoing spill to the inundation of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

· Biblical Prophecies Abound Once More — About 61% of all references involve the Bible. (Even Ted Turner has a theory how the oil spill might be a warning from God.) These are markedly different in tone than those used with Katrina where the references focused on apocalyptic imagery, End-of-the-World scenarios and doom.

· The Obama Style of Leadership – This is a close one 52% see Obama as ‘hand’s on’ leadership, 48% see ‘hand’s off’. Again, this is either positive or negative depending on your political bias. Ronald Reagan was seen as a ‘hand’s off’ president and that was considered good. Jimmy Carter was a ‘hand’s on’ type president and that was considered bad.

“The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important to track since he who wins control of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “With the mid-term elections just five months away, and the prospect of the Gulf Oil Spill continuing unabated for months, control of the narrative is more important than ever.”

The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative. The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.

The term ‘narrative’ in this sense is now appearing thousands of times in the global media on the Internet and blogosphere as well as throughout the world of social media, meaning the main streams of public opinion running in the media that needs to be fed, encouraged, diverted or influenced by any means possible.

GLM recently announced The Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), in partnership with OpenConnect Systems of Dallas. The Healthcare NTI is the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time.

The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.



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Quantifying the Gulf Oil Spill

A Technical Communications Perspective

How about 50,000 Cars on the Pacific Coast Highway?

Or a 747 with 500 on board flying for 57 minutes?

Austin, Texas, May 20, 2010 — What does 5,000 (or 50,000) barrels of oil a day mean to you?  We’ve been hearing that number for almost a month now.  And there is some debate whether or not those are accurate numbers.  But what does it mean other than ‘a whole lotta oil’?  This is the question that Global Language Monitor President, Paul JJ Payack examined over the last few days in the following analysis.

Metric Conversion:  1 gallon = 3.79 liters; 1 barrel = 158.98 liters; 1 mile = 1.61 kilometers

Listen or Read: KUHF —  Analyst Puts BP Gulf Oil Spill Into Perspectiveto Quantify the Oil Spill at 50,000 Barrels Per Day?

Back when I taught technical and scientific communications at the University of Massachusetts, a key function was to make physical dimensions meaningful to the audience, so we would describe a mainframe computer as the size of a washing machine (used to be an 18 wheeler), a server might be the size of a breadbox (though few have actually seen a breadbox nowadays but we all know it’s about ‘yeah big’).  In the same manner Jupiter is about the size of 80,000 Earths, the Moon’s diameter is about equal to the width of the continental US (or the distance from New York to LA), and you could stuff approximately one million Earths into the Sun.

When you describe the volume of a liquid, such as water, you make comparisons like ‘if you emptied Lake Tahoe – which is nearly 1000 feet deep  —  and spread about 14 inches over the entire state’.

In terms of energy usage, a common description is to equate a megawatt to the number of homes for which it supplies power.  So a one megawatt nuclear reactor, or wind farm, can power about a thousand American homes, or 10,000 homes in less-developed parts of the world.

So what does the 5,000 to 50,000 barrels a day mean?   First question is ‘what’s a barrel’?’  A barrel is filled with forty-two gallons of oil.  So 5,000 to 50,000 barrels equates to some 210,000 to 2.1 million gallons (or 16.8 million half-pints if you’re thinking in terms small milk cartons distributed in schools).

It does not help, of course, when the CEO of BP likens the spill to a drop in the bucket in relation to the capacity of the oceans.  This strikes most people as condescending but it is actually NOT true.  It is far less than a drop in the bucket when compared to the size of the seas, which contain about 321 million cubic miles of water, so even if the spill is now 1 mile deep by 1 mile wide, by 1 mile in height (USGS numbers) that would be far less than a drop (1 part oil to 321,000,000 parts water).  (Though I am definitely not using this explanation to support BP’s argument here.)

Put another way, in light sweet crude you get about 19.5 gallons of gasoline from the 42 gallons of oil.  Now if a typical car gets about 20 mpg on the highway, that would be equivalent to about 390 miles per barrel.

This is the distance from Los Angeles to San Francisco (actually 383 miles). So if the spill has been spewing 5,000 to 50,000 barrels per day since April 20; that is enough to power 5,000 to 50,000 cars a day along the Pacific Coast highway (or the I-5) from San Francisco to LA.

One more equivalency.  747 aircraft in flight with about 500 people on board are estimated to use about use about a gallon of kerosene a second. About 4.1 gallons are distilled from each barrel of oil.  So 5,000 barrels of crude oil produce 20,500 gallons of kerosene, while 50,000 barrels of oil produce 205,000 gallons of kerosene.

This means 5,000 barrels enables a 747 with 500 passengers to fly 5.7 minutes, while the amount of kerosene from 50,000 barrels of crude oil will allow the same plane to fly almost an hour (56.9 minutes).



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NarrativeTracker

Click Here for the NarrativeTracker Overview

Healthcare NTI™ (NarrativeTracker Index™) is the first social media tracking tool designed to monitor public opinions on healthcare. Because the Healthcare NTI is based on the national (or regional or, even local) discourse – in real time, it provides a more accurate picture of what the public is actually thinking, on any topic, at any point in time.

Click here to go to the OpenConnect NarrativeTracker site.

Press Release:

NarrativeTracker: the First Social Media-based Tracking Tool Announced

NarrativeTracker Index™ to provide policy-makers unbiased public opinion on Healthcare Reform or any other topic.
(Media-Newswire.com) - Dallas and Austin, Texas,  May 12, 2010 – Today, The Global Language Monitor ( GLM ), the media analytics company,  announced the launch of the Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ ( NTI™ ), the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform.

Because the Healthcare NTI is based on the national discourse, it provides a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. In addition to the NTI, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative to provide a comprehensive overview of the opinions surrounding a single issue.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet. The rise of the narrative actually renders positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

“Just as there are solutions that provide an unprecedented view into a company’s workflows looking for process variations that drive inefficiency and waste, NTI tracks the ‘narrative’ of a subject, as well as projecting future trajectories for the narrative,” said Edward ML Peters,Ph.D.

The result has several advantages over traditional polls:

1 ) Immediacy

2 ) The lack of any bias that tends to creep into traditional polling, e.g., when individuals answer questions with what they think are the ‘correct’ answers rather than their true opinions.

3 ) NTI lets policy and decision makers focus on the true issues driving perceptions and concerns rather than being driven by false and phantom concepts.

In addition, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative.

“The goal of influencers, whether it’s the media, advertisers or politicians, is to spin news so that it resonates best with their target audience,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLMNTI is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.”

The NTI is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ ( PQI™ ). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

The Healthcare NTI will be released on a monthly basis beginning Thursday, May 13, 2010. The first analysis details the various narratives surrounding Massachusetts Healthcare reform, a healthcare model which has been adopted in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as the national healthcare reform bill.

 

About The Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the Blogosphere, Social Media as well as the Top 25,000 print and electronic media sites.

For more information on NarrativeTracker, call 1.512.801.6823 or send email to PaulJJPayack@gmail.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

News Releases

May 13, 2010
NarrativeTracker Provides Unbiased Public Opinion on Healthcare
May 12, 2010
OpenConnect announces first social media tracking tool to monitor public opinions on healthcare

Read What the Media is Saying
May 12, 2010

CNBC.com

OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index(TM) to Provide Policy-Makers Unbiased Public Opinion on Aspects Related to Healthcare
Austin company gauging health care opinion through Web word tracking
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
OpenConnect Announces First Social Media Tracking Tool to Monitor Public Opinions on Healthcare
Austin company gauging health care opinion through Web word tracking

For More Information Contact:
Paul JJ Payack
pjjp@post.Harvard.edu
512.801.6823



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NarrativeTracker: the First Social Media-based Tracking Tool Announced


Click here for a NarrativeTracker Overview


NarrativeTracker Index™ to provide policy-makers unbiased public opinion on Healthcare Reform

Dallas and Austin, Texas, May 12, 2010 —  Today OpenConnect Systems and The Global Language Monitor have announced the joint launch of the Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform. Because the Healthcare NTI is based on the national discourse, it provides a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. In addition to the NTI, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative to provide a comprehensive overview of the opinions surrounding a single issue.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet. The rise of the narrative actually renders positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

“Just as the OpenConnect Comprehend solution provides an unprecedented view into a company’s workflows looking for process variations that drive inefficiency and waste, NTI tracks the ‘narrative’ of a subject, as well as projecting future trajectories for the narrative,” said Edward ML Peters, CEO of OpenConnect.

The result has several advantages over traditional polls:

1) Immediacy

2) The lack of any bias that tends to creep into traditional polling, e.g., when individuals answer questions with what they think are the ‘correct’ answers rather than their true opinions.

3) NTI lets policy and decision makers focus on the true issues driving perceptions and concerns rather than being driven by false and phantom concepts.

In addition, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative.

“The goal of influencers, whether it’s the media, advertisers or politicians, is to spin news so that it resonates best with their target audience,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.  NTI is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.”

The NTI is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

The Healthcare NTI will be released on a monthly basis beginning Thursday, May 13, 2010. The first analysis details the various narratives surrounding Massachusetts Healthcare reform, a healthcare model which has been adopted in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as the national healthcare reform bill.

About Open Connect

OpenConnect business process discovery and analytics deliver event-driven intelligence to automatically discover workforce, process and customer variations that hinder operational efficiency. Armed with this information, executives can make the quick and incremental improvements that will increase process efficiency, improve employee productivity, reduce cost, and raise profitability. With a rich history of developing innovative technology, OpenConnect products are distributed in more than 60 countries and used by more than 60 percent of Fortune 100 companies. For more information on OpenConnect, visit www.oc.com.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the Blogosphere, Social Media as well as the Top 25,000 print and electronic media sites.

Go to NarrativeTracker Page

For more information on NarrativeTracker, call 1.512.801.6823, or send email to PaulJJPayack@gmail.com , or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.




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Vor kurzem erzielte die englische Sprache einen Weltrekord.

BMW Group Award für Interkulturelles Engagement
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To read this article in German (02 27 other languages) go to our sister site, Mojofiti.

No noising, please.
Vor kurzem erzielte die englische Sprache einen Weltrekord. Mehr als eine Million Wörter umfasst das Englische nun, laut dem in Austin (Texas) ansässigen Global Language Monitor (GLM), einer Institution, die seit 1999 die Anzahl der Wörter in der englischen Sprache zählt. Zum Vergleich: Die spanische Sprache umfasst etwa 275.000 Wörter, Französisch gerade einmal 100.000.

„Englisch ist eine offene Sprache und absorbiert Wörter sehr schnell“, so der Linguist, Wortanalyst und Gründer des GLM Paul Payack. „Die Franzosen sagen nicht Computer sondern L’Ordinateur. Amerikaner haben kein Problem mit Wörtern wie ‚Kindergarten‘ oder ‚Croissant‘. Sogar ‚Ketchup‘, die Bezeichnung für ein urtypisches amerikanisches Produkt, ist eigentlich ein Wort aus dem Kantonesischen.“

Durch die weltweite Verbreitung der englischen Sprache, erst durch das britische Empire und später durch die von den USA vorangetriebene Globalisierung, hat sich die Aufnahme neuer Wörter noch beschleunigt, so Payack.

Eine noch fundamentalere Evolution erlebt die Sprache jedoch durch die Entkopplung der englischen Muttersprachler von der Verwendung „ihrer“ Sprache. „Wenn sich ein Chinese und ein Franzose unterhalten, dann höchstwahrscheinlich auf Englisch“, erklärt Payack. „Englische Muttersprachler sind daran gar nicht mehr beteiligt. Nun reden diese beiden aber natürlich kein Oxford-Englisch, sondern eine sehr regional geprägte Variante des Englischen: Der Chinese fügt vielleicht am Ende einer Frage ein typisches chinesisches Fragewort wie „ma“ ein und der Franzose benutzt französischen Satzbau.“

So entsteht beispielsweise das Phänomen des sogenannten „Chinglish“ oder „Spanglish“, Mischungen aus dem Englischen und Chinesischen oder Spanischen. Neben neuen Wörtern wie „no noising“ statt „quite please“ oder „airline pulp“ für „airline food“, entstehen so auch ganz neue Sprachstrukturen. Die pure Menge der Nichtmuttersprachler, die Englisch in ihrem täglichen Leben verwenden, ist zu einer treibenden Kraft in der Entwicklung der Sprache geworden. Dieser Prozess führt zur Entstehung einer Spielart des Englischen, die man zum Beispiel auf internationalen Tagungen oder anderen Gelegenheiten beobachten kann, bei denen viele Nichtmuttersprachler gemeinsam auf Englisch kommunizieren. „An Universitäten und in Unternehmen auf der ganzen Welt und vor allem im Internet: Überall und zu jeder Zeit wird englisch von zahllosen Nichtmuttersprachlern gesprochen. Das führt mit Sicherheit zur größten Evolution, die die englische Sprache jemals erlebt hat”, so Payack. „Auch wenn das sehr lange dauern würde, ein solcher Prozess könnte sogar zur Entstehung einer vollkommen neuen Weltsprache führen.“

Solche Szenarien, die konservative Sprachschützer in den Wahnsinn treiben würden, lassen Sprachforscher wie Paul Payack jedoch kalt. Im Gegenteil: Payack begrüßt den Wandel. „Wir haben keine Institutionen die bestimmen, so wird Englisch gesprochen und so nicht. Die englische Sprache bleibt flexibel und kann sich der Zeit anpassen. Ich denke, das ist auch besser so.“

Webseite des „Global Language Monitor“:
https://www.languagemonitor.com


Zurück



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Pomona College Ranked Sixth in Media Awareness

Pomona College is currently ranked sixth out of all colleges on The Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings.

The report, released biannually, ranks colleges and universities in terms of their presence in international print and electronic media. The report is meant to assess schools’ media awareness and global reputations.

Pomona rose from its position of 21 in the spring 2009 college rankings to sixth this previous fall. The top-ranked college was Wellesley College, while the University of Michigan topped the university rankings.

“During 2008-09, Pomona College was mentioned more than 2,800 times in print, broadcast, and on online news sites, a record for the nine years we’ve been tracking,” said Cynthia Peters, Director of Media Relations at Pomona College.  (Read More.)

GLM’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities Spring 2010 Edition will be released Week of May 24th.

See November Rankings here.

Read more

Game: Can you name the Fashion Capitals of the World?

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Enter a city in the box below

You will have five minutes to complete the quiz.

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The Top Fashion Capitals of 2010 were announced on July 19.

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Some Cities are already campaigning to move up in the rankings.




EC Multilingualism News — Can you say Eyjafjallajoekull?

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A Texas-based language expert group said Eyjafjallajoekull, the Icelandic volcano paralysing air traffic recently, appears 2 million times on Google but can be pronounced by only 320,000 people.

Eyjafjallajökull

Paul J.J. Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor, said Eyjafjallajoekull is unlikely to appear in English-language dictionaries anytime soon.

Did you know?

There are many examples of proper names becoming common words, including caesarian section, named after Julius Caesar, who was ‘plucked from his mother’s womb’ or saxophone after its Belgian inventor Adolphe Sax. Such words are called ‘eponyms’ and are quite common in all languages. Eyjafjallajoekull, however, is unlikely to make such a career.

The Global Language Monitor in Austin, Texas, documents, analyzes and tracks trends in language the world over, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

Find out about the correct pronunciation of Eyjafjallajoekull and many other interesting things related to the media, words and the impact of language on various aspects of culture on the website of the Global Language Monitor.

Watch this video to polish your pronunciation of Eyjafjallajoekull.



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Iceland’s volcano a mouthful to say

CNN
By Tom Watkins, CNN
April 21, 2010 — Updated 0423 GMT (1223 HKT)
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Media outlets differ on pronunciation
  • Google search finds more than 2.5 million citations for the word

(CNN)  — An event as big as a volcano that disrupts transportation around the globe might be expected to have its name added to the English lexicon, perhaps meaning “to cause widespread disruption,” an English-language monitor said Tuesday.

People talk about a ‘Krakatau,’ right?” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor, in a telephone interview. He was referring to the 1883 eruption of a volcano in Indonesia that unleashed a tsunami that killed more than 34,000 people.

Payack’s Austin-Texas-based monitor analyzes and catalogues trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on culture, with an emphasis on English.

Tsunami” itself has gained in usage since the 2004 South Asia event that left 245,000 people dead or missing across the region, said Payack.

When prices collapsed economically, the first thing that they called it was an ‘economic tsunami,’” he said.

But what happens when that volcano’s name is Eyjafjallajokull, as in the Icelandic volcano whose ash clouds have grounded thousands of flights worldwide?

Payack was not optimistic. “I’ve never heard anybody pronounce it right yet, and I couldn’t even try,” he said.

There are very few words that appear millions of times in print yet can be pronounced by so few.”

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 — Paul J.J. Payack, president of Global Language Monitor

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Eyjafjallajoekull: What happens if a volcano erupts and no one can pronounce its name?

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Austin, Texas, April 20, 2010 — Eyjafjallajoekull , the Icelandic volcano that has been disrupting airborne transportation systems around the globe, would ordinarily stand an excellent chance of becoming an English language word at some time in the future, perhaps meaning to cause widespread disruption.  A word that evolves from a name is called an eponym.  Eyjafjallajoekull is already cited some two million times on Google. But a larger question arises: can a word enter the English language if only 320,000 can pronounce it (and most of those are citizens of Iceland)?

“A dictionary contains the spoken words in a language and those used in the written form of the spoken language known as exposition,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “However, there are very few words that appear millions of times in print yet can be pronounced by so few.”

Over the course of its 1400-year old history, scores of proper names have moved into the English language.  Examples include caesarian section, named after Julius Caesar, who was ‘plucked from his mother’s womb’; cardigan sweater, worn by the 7th Earl of Cardigan (who also led the Charge of the Light Brigade); and shakespearean, a supreme literary accomplishment named after the Bard, among many others.  There are approximately 1.53 billion English speakers that can readily pronounce each of these.  Eyjafjallajoekull is another matter entirely.

For the record, Eyjafjallajoekull is pronounced ay-yah-FYAH-plah-yer-kuh-duhl.



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A recession neither great nor small …

 

 

 

Summary:  What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.

Austin, Texas, April 16, 2010 — Originally alluded to as a ‘Financial Tsunami’ or ‘Financial Meltdown,’ the major global media seem to have gained a consensus as ‘The Great Recession’.  In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as ‘The Depression’ in the same way that many still refer to World War II as ‘The War’.  But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called ‘Great Recession’.

We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of the Global Language Monitor, “because it does not resemble any economic crisis of the past — but rather a crisis of another sort”.

In On War, one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time, the Prussian career soldier Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831) stated one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’ and by other rules than those of the political and financial norm of the recent past.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out ‘by other means’ and by other rules than those of the political and financial norm of the recent past.

This fact is entrapping two US presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma:  describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules.  Therefore the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the US economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse.  Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the US economy is emerging out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If you carefully disassemble the events of the last decade or two, one can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (Energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured good and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that  inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately understand, or even explain, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history.  In fact the larger realities are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that is out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed.  This is especially so as they watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the difficulty in naming the current economic crisis is the fact that is not an economic crisis at all but rather a transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries along with the associated collateral (or human) damage.

By Paul JJ Payack and Edward ML Peters



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Who really won in Vancouver: Ambushers

Four of the five top brands at the Winter Games

Red Bull Top Ambush Marketer at Vancouver Olympics

Proctor & Gamble, the No. 1 Olympic Sponsor of Any Type

Ambushers Pepsi and Verizon Best Sponsors Coca-Cola and AT&T

Subway Still Strong

“Gang of Five” Canadians beat all IOC sponsors except Visa


Austin, TX March 24, 2010 – The final TrendTopper Ambush Index™ of the Vancouver Winter Olympics 2010 by Austin-based Global Language Monitor, has shown, once again, how companies adept at associating themselves with an event, even though they are not ‘official’ sponsors of that event, can often outperform official sponsors.

Specifically, for the Vancouver Olympics, TrendTopper AI has found that:

  • Red Bull and the Martin Scorsese film ‘Shutter Island’ are the top Ambush Marketers.  ‘Shutter Island’ forged its Olympic linkage by running innumerable prime-time ads during NBC’s exclusive coverage of the event.
  • Ambusher Pepsi beat sponsor Coca-Cola; Ambusher Verizon beat sponsor AT&T
  • Subway, with it ongoing campaign with mega-medal winner Michael Phelps maintained strong ties to the Games
  • The ‘Gang of Five,’ the smaller Canadian Ambushers (Blenz Coffee, Howe Sound Brewing, Lululemon, Scotiabank, and Roots Canada) all beat all IOC sponsors with the exception of Visa (which was bested by four of the five).
  • Proctor & Gamble performed surprisingly well as No. 2 overall and the No. 1 Sponsor of any type.

In addition, the analysis found that past official sponsors appear to bask in the glow of their Olympic association for some time after the quadrennial event with past-sponsor Lenovo outpacing current sponsors Acer and Samsung.

“Do Olympic Sponsorships actually pay off for official sponsors?  That’s the question that has advertisers buzzing,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM.  “Since TrendTopper AI measures all perceived Olympic sponsors according to their presence in the global media, If they are statistically linked to the Vancouver Games, they qualify for the Ambush Index.”

The TrendTopper Ambush Index tracks brand media presence in relation to the Winter Games.  It’s based upon GLM’s Predictive Quantities Index, a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere, now including social media. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

For the 2009 – 2012 Olympic Quadrennial, there are nine Global Partners:  Coca-Cola, Acer, GE, McDonalds, Omega, Panasonic, Samsung, Visa, and AT&T.  The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has two additional national partners:  P&G and the Budweiser unit of inBev.  The Canadian Olympic committee has a number of local partners, of which five were included:  Deloitte, Tyson Foods, United Airlines, Hilton and Nike.

For this analysis, the Ambush Marketers included:  Verizon, Subway, Pepsi, MasterCard and Adidas in the Global Category.  The National Category included Lululemon Athletica, Blenz Coffee, Roots Canada, Scotiabank and Howe Sound Brewing.  Past sponsors who continue to enjoy the glow of past Olympic associations, such as: Allstate, Bank of America, Home Depot, and Lenovo were also included in the analysis.

The Top Twenty-five marketers as measured by brand media presence in relation to the Winter Games.

` VO Partner Affiliation
Rank
1 Howe Sound Brewing Ambusher
2 P&G USOC
3 Shutter Island Ambusher
4 Scotiabank Ambusher
5 Lululemon Athletica Ambusher
6 United COC
7 Blenz Coffee Ambusher
8 Visa IOC
9 Red Bull Ambusher
10 Tyson COC
11 Roots Canada Ambusher
12 Budweiser USOC
13 McDonalds IOC
14 Pepsi Ambusher
15 Home Depot Inc Tornino USOC
16 Subway Ambusher
17 Verizon Ambusher
18 Hudson’s Bay Ambushed
19 Exxon Mobil Corp Past Sponsor
20 Deloitte COC
21 AT&T IOC
22 Bank of America Torino USOC
23 Nike COC
24 Hilton COC
25 Omega IOC

The complete study of forty brands, with numerical analysis and changes in rankings over the course of the Games is available from the Global Language Monitor by calling 925.367.7557 or visiting www.LanguageMonitor.com.

In the TrendTopper AI analysis, Marketers are ranked both by category and then overall. Rankings are calculated, normalized and cross-indexed.  For trend analysis, momentum and velocity calculations, the TrendTopper AI analysis was run at the halfway point of the Winters Games, with the final tally appearing after the Closing Ceremony.



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For more information, call 1.512.801.6823.

Most Confusing High Tech Buzzwords of 2000-2009

Austin, Texas, March 17, 2010 — In conjunction with the SXSW Interactive conference held in its hometown, The Global Language Monitor has released the most confusing high tech buzzwords of the decade (2000-2009). Topping the list are HTTP, Flash, God Particle, Cloud Computing, and Plasma (as in plasma TV). Rounding out the Top Ten were IPOD/IPAD, Megapixel, Nano, Resonate and Virtualization.

The most confusing Acronym for the decade was SOA (Service Oriented Architecture).

SXSW has long been a harbinger for future directions in popular culture and now the gathering has taken on the added dimension of technological innovation,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of the Global Language Monitor, “The words we use in high technology continue to become even more obtuse even as they move out of the realm of jargon and into the language at large.”

The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

The Most Confusing High Tech Buzzwords of the decade (2000-2009) with Commentary follow:

1. HTTP — HyperText Transfer Protocol is used for HTML (HyperText Markup Language) files. Not to be confused with text on too much Starbucks.

2. Flash — As in Flash Memory. “Flash’ is easier to say than “ I brought the report on my EEPROM chip with a thin oxide layer separating a floating gate and control gate utilizing Fowler-Nordheim electron tunneling”.

3. God Particle – The Higgs boson, thought to account for mass. The God Particle has eluded discovery since its existence was first postulated some thirty years ago.

4. Cloud Computing – Distributing or accessing programs and services across the Internet. (The Internet is represented as a cloud.)

5. Plasma (as in plasma TV) — Refers less often to blood products than to a kind of television screen technology that uses matrix of gas plasma cells, which are charged by differing electrical voltages to create an image.

6. IPOD – What the Alpha Whale calls his personal pod. Actually, Apple maintains that the idea of the iPod was from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey. The origin of the word IPAD is a completely different story.

7. Megapixel – Either a really large picture element (pixel) or a whole mess of pixels. Actually, one million pixels (that’s a lotta pixels) OK, what’s a pixel? Computer-ese for picture element.

8. Nano – Widely used to describe anything small as in nanotechnology. Like the word ‘mini’ which originally referred to the red hues in Italian miniature paintings, the word nano- is ultimately derived from the ancient Greek word for ‘dwarf’.

9. Resonate – Not the tendency of a system to oscillate at maximum amplitude, but the ability to relate to (or resonate with) a customer’s desires.

10. Virtualization – Around since dinosaurs walked the planet (the late ‘70s) virtualization now applies to everything from infrastructures to I/O.

11. Solution — Ever popular yet still an amorphous description of high tech packages of hardware, software and service

12. Cookie — Without cookies with their ‘persistent state’ management mechanism the web as we know it, would cease to exist.

13. Robust — No one quite knows what it means, but it’s good for your product to demonstrate robustness

14. Emoticon A smiley with an emotional component (from emotional icon). Now, what’s a smiley? :’)

15. De-duping – Shorthand for de-duplication, that is, removing redundant data from a system.

16. Green washing – Repositioning your product so that its shortfalls are now positioned as environmental benefits: Not enough power? Just re-position as energy-saving.

17. Buzzword Compliant — To include the latest buzzwords in literature about a product or service in order to make it ‘resonate’ with the customer.

18. Petaflop — A thousand trillion (or quadrillion) floating point operations per second Often mistaken as a comment on a failed program by an animal rights’ group.

19. Hadron – A particle made of quarks bound together by the strong force; they are either mesons (made of one quark and one anti-quark) or baryons (made of three quarks).

20. Large Hadron Collider – The ‘atom smasher’ located underground outside Geneva. Primarily built to re-create the conditions of creation, 1 trillionth of a second after the Big Bang.

21. Versioning – Creating new revisions (or versions) with fewer bugs and more features.

22. VoIP – Voice Over IP, itself shorthand for Voice over Internet Protocol, which in plain English means the ability to talk on the phone over the Internet.

23. Web 2.0 – Now there’s talk of Web 3.0, just when we were finally getting used to the advances web services called Web 2.0.

24. Word Clouds – Graphic representations of the words used in a text, the more frequently used, the larger the representation.

25. WORM — Not only not a computer virus anymore, let alone a slithery creature of the soil, but “a Write Once, Read Many file system used for optical disk technology

Most Confusing High Tech Acronym of the Decade

SOA – Service Oriented Architecture. Far-and-away No. 1. If it’s so easy to understand, why are hundreds of books written trying to explain exactly what it is.

Early Candidate for Most Confusing High Tech Buzzword of the 2nd Decade of the Century (Possibly a very short decade, Indeed.)

B’ak’tuns – According to the Long-Count Mayan Calendar (high tech for the late A.D.600’s) the end of a ‘Great Cycle’ of thirteen b’ak’tuns (periods of 144,000 days each) since the Mayan creation date of August 11, 3114 BC. According to popular belief, December 21st, 2012 will be the End of the World.



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Lady Gaga Top Fashion Buzzword

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Lady GaGa Top Fashion Buzzword of Uncoming Season

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Michelle Obama Falls from No.2 to No. 15

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Austin, TX February 2, 2010 – Lady GaGa, the enigmatic yet near ubiquitous performance artist, was declared the Top Fashion Buzzword of the upcoming season by the Global Language Monitor. This is the first time that a name has topped the GLM’s rankings. Immediately following were ‘leggins 2.0,’ ‘no pants,’ ‘off-shoulder,” and ‘chandlier’ as in earrings. Rounding out the Top Ten were the ‘boyfriend’ craze, ‘peek-a-boos,’ ‘camos’ as in camouflage, ‘Hippie Luxe,’ and ‘Armadillo’. Michelle Obama as a fashion icon was reflected in the term ‘Mobama. Mercedes Fashion Week for the fall 2010 collections begins on February 11th in New York City, followed by the shows in the other major fashion capitals: London, Milan, and Paris.

Schott’s Vocab on Top Fashion Buzzwords

“The relationship between Stefani Germanotta, the girl from Yonkers, and haute couture may not be intuitively obvious, until you realize that Stefani would soon grow into one Lady GaGa,” said Millie L. Payack, director and fashion correspondent of the Global Language Monitor. “The fact remains that the world of fashion has been duly impacted by her in ways some subtle and some rather profound.”

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Newser’s Intriguing Slide Show

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The words were chosen from the global fashion media and nominated by key fashionistas from around the world. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Predictive Quantities Index, a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere, now including social media. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

The Top Fashion Buzzwords with commentary follow:

1. Lady Gaga — Enigmatic performance artist has had outsized impact on the world of fashion.

2. Leggins 2.0 – Flourishing from Milano to Main Street, leggings are now differentiated as jeggings (jeans + leggings) and meggings (male leggings), and the like.

3. No pants – Hot pants for the 21st Century; not much pant (see Lady GaGa).

4. Off-shoulder – One shoulder and Off-the-shoulder asymmetrics are now combined with cutouts, draping, or heritage stylings.

5. Chandeliers — Earrings, that is.

6. Boyfriend (the jacket, jeans etc) – It’s getting to be like an Audrey Hepburn movie out there with boyfriend jackets, jeans and the like.

7. Peek-a-boo – Peek-a-boo fashion is back once again; this time as cutouts.

8. Camos – Camouflage is back, this time with an Urban Jungle vibe.

9. Hippie-luxe – Haute Hippies? That’s the Hippie Luxe movement inspired by the 40th anniversary of that classic New York Daily News headline: “600,000 Hippies Mired in Mud”.

10. Armadillos – Shaped like a lobster, made of Python, and called Armadillos — the highly controversial sculpted shoe designs of Alexander McQueen.

11. Mixed prints – Mixing various print in sometimes surprising ways: florals, tropicals, geometrics, polka dots, psychedelics, modernism-inspired, even plaids.

12. Embellishments – Delicate, all, including ruffles, transparency and tulle.

13. Ethical fashion – Echoes of PETA here. No furs, no armadillos, no leather.

14. Fashion 2.0 — Incorporating streaming techniques that bring designer showcases and shows to the buyers and consumers in real time.

15. MObama – OK, so she wears ‘mom’ jeans, but everyone seems to notice, after all Michelle is The Mobama.

Each July, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Fashion Cities of the Year ranked by Internet presence in a global survey. In 2009, Milan upended New York after a five-year reign as the Top Fashion Capital followed by New York, Paris, Rome and London. Other top movers included Hong Kong and Sao Paulo, who broke into the Top 10, while Barcelona and Miami surged. In the ever-tightening battle for the Subcontinent Mumbai outdistanced Delhi, while Sydney further outdistanced Melbourne.

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