OK, So It’s a Boy; Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists)

OK, So It’s a Boy;  Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists)

A Tight  List With a Sudden Re-emergence of Traditional Names as Trendy

July 23, 2013  Austin, TEXAS — The Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists) The Top Royal Baby’s Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet.  This is an update to that story.

For the analysis, GLM examined a score of masculine names most associated with the British Throne since A.D. 1700.  GLM then cross-referenced them with names associated with the royal birth according to global Internet  MediaBuzz.  Finally, since Prince William and the former Kate Middleton seem to have a penchant for the latest fashion, GLM then cross-referenced the Classic Royal Names withe the top male  baby names in the UK, US, and Australia for 2012.

The Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) ranks the names according to their association with the royal birth.

Read more

Top Royal Baby Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet

Speculation for Girl over Boy:   64%-36%

Alexandra No. 1 for Classic Royal Names

Amelia, Charlotte, Emma and variants of Elisabeth among the more popular girls names

July 22, 2013  (Updated) Austin, TEXAS — Last week the Global Language Monitor announced the Top Royal Baby’s Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet.  This is an update to that story.

For the analysis, GLM examined three dozen feminine names from the British royal lineage over the last 200 years and then cross-referenced them with names associated with the royal birth  in Internet  MediaBuzz.  Since Prince William and the former Kate Middleton seem to have a penchant for the latest fashion, GLM then cross-referenced the Classic Royal Names withe the top girls baby names in the UK, US, and Australia for 2012.

Members of the British Royal Family often carry several names, as many as four or five are in contention. Queen Elizabeth’s full Christian name is Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. while Price William’s is William Arthur Philip Louis.

In the analysis, GLM searched hundreds of millions of Internet sources, the blogosphere, the top 250,000 electronic and media sites, as well as social media sources, as they emerge.  The analysis was completed earlier this week.

The Top Classic Royal Female Names according to Internet MediaBuzz

Read more

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

Read: Why the Flutie Effect is Real (Harvard Business Review)

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Big Ten Tops, SEC Most improved

Both New Big East Conferences Tumble

 

Austin, TX July 4th Weekend – July 4th might be Independence Day, but July 1st, was Conference Realignment Day when dozens of college and universities landed in what they hope to be greener pastures. The Global Language Monitor, analyzed pre-2012 conference configurations and compared them with their new membership additions or deletions.

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

  1. The Big Ten continues to rank first in academic reputation.
  2. Ohio State was the top ranked school in the Big 10.
  3. The PAC 12 lost ground with Utah, but is now just slightly behind the ACC.
  4. If included in the rankings the academically renowned Ivy League would have bested the Big Ten and the Patriot League would be in a virtual tie with the Big Ten.
  5. The Atlantic Coast Conference was a close No. 2, pulling within ten percent of the leader.
  6. The Southeast Conference was the most improved after adding two academic stars (Texas A&M and Mizzou).
  7. Both the New and Old Big East (Big East and American Athletic) conferences fell by about 20% each
  8. The academic reputation of the Big 12 remained virtually unchanged, after taking the hit with the loss of Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado and A&M.
  9. The ACC gains with the addition of Pitt and Syracuse but will pull back a bit in 2014 with the addition of Louisville.
  10. The Big Ten will grow even stronger with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland.

Let’s adopt that de-dictionaried 63-letter German word into English

Dropping a word from a dictionary does not unmake a word

 

Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz

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Austin, Texas, June 5, 2013  –  Earlier this week, it was revealed that the Duden dictionary of ‘Correct German Spelling’  had dropped Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz from its latest edition.

“Dropping a word from a dictionary does not unmake a word,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Wonk of the Global Language Monitor.   “It’s simply a question of how frequently a word is used factored by its depth and breadth of use.   A modest proposal might be to  simply add #Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz to the English language.  After all, English is classified as a ‘Germanic’ language, and about a quarter of our words have Germanic  roots”.

 

Click below to hear the pronunciation of Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz:

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Common German words that we’ve adopted into English include:

  • blitz
  • Doppelgänger
  • wurst
  • schadenfreude
  • zeitgeist
  • kindergarten
  • dreck

So why not Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz?

Even if it refers to a repealed law, even if it literally means “law for the delegation of monitoring beef labeling”,   English is quite adaptable and  the world’s 1.83 billion English speakers could evolve its current meaning in any number of ways, not to mention the memes and Gifs it could spawn.

Granted it will be rather difficult to stuff into a 140-character Tweet.

As a public service we;ve created  a sample tweet for you:  Let’s adopt the expunged #German word #Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz into #English @LanguageMonitor.

English already has about a million words and adds s about 14.7 new words a day, so there is definitely room for one more.

 

 

Obama and the null set narrative

Reprinted from The Hill, May 31, 2009

Obama and the null set narrative

By Paul JJ Payack

We have been analyzing the narrative of Barack Obama for some years now. In fact, we’ve tracked three differing narratives in the course of his campaign and the first term of his presidency. We’ve tracked the president’s highs (the “Yes we can!” Grant Park Speech, and others of soaring rhetoric), and his lows (the much more pedestrian Gulf Oil Spill effort).

We’ve been praised for our astute analysis, and condemned for announcing his premature political death. At the time, the Global Language Monitor’s analysis of the BP Oil Spill speech was actually pulled off CNN and replaced by a far milder critique. In retrospect, that speech was a harbinger of what was to come — Barack Obama bereft of Hope and Change.

Not that we didn’t have hints about of what was about to transpire. Consider the disposition of these “hope-and-change type” promises: (1) the immediate shutdown of Guantanamo, (2) the end of the K Street revolving door and (3) holding the bankers accountable for their part in the financial meltdown. How exactly do you make sense of these countervailing (or even contradictory) positions?

Obama and the null set narrative.

Now consider the president’s recent speech on U.S. defense policy: after ramping up the use of drones against “enemy combatants,” with hundreds of civilians deaths by the administration’s own estimate, he stands firmly against gratuitous drone strikes. After keeping Gitmo open for going on five years now, he will now do everything in his power to close it. How to make sense of these seemingly oppositional positions?

The null set narrative.

In the run-up to the 2010 midterms, we began to formally track the president’s narrative. We were curious to better understand how the word ‘narrative’ rose to be the No. 1 political buzzword at that time and what it meant to this presidency. Other terms frequently used to describe Obama at the time, included: detached, aloof, hands-off or professorial. Some took these words to be demeaning and/or insulting.

Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “The danger comes when politicians and their operatives essentially use ‘narrative’ … the version of the truth that they want us to believe even when they don’t believe it.”

Since his reelection last November, we have remained silent on the subject — awaiting the second term narrative to emerge. With the recent series of crises, scandals and/or events, we now are, indeed, witnessing this new narrative: the null set narrative.

Consider, if you will, the current plight of one Jay Carney.

It is always interesting how one’s attributes can be used to praise or condemn depending on the narrative in which they are described.

However, this is a narrative that can fit around any news, story or scandal; more to the point, it is completely irrelevant to the words ensconced within it. Any words, anytime, anywhere. This is the narrative of choice for the administration at this point in time.

And now detached, aloof, and hands-off are the favored phrases in this administration’s null set narrative.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/the-administration/302749-obama-and-the-null-set-narrative#ixzz2UuzupYr7

 

2013 Major Golf Championships Ranked by Internet Media Buzz

British Open No. 1 by the wide margin, Master’s No. 2

 

In Analysis ‘The Players’ Ranks higher than the PGA

 

Biggest Problem:  Nicklaus adds three Majors (to 21), Woods adds only one (to 15).

Austin, Texas. May 11, 2013. (Updated)  Open Championship has been declared the Top Golf Major by Internet Media Buzz, according to an analysis using Global Language Monitor’s Sports Brand Affiliation Index (S-BAI).  

One major point of resistance:  By elevating the Players to Major Status means Nicklaus adds three Majors to his total (to 21), while Woods adds only one (to 15).
The S-BAI analysis compared the strength of affiliation of each of the currently recognized events (The Masters, The US Open, The Open Championship or British Open and the PGA Championship) to the concept of ‘major championship’.  GLM then added the Players Championship for comparison with the four recognized events.  In an associated finding, the Players Championship has entered into the top ranks of the golfing world as one of the sport’s major championship events or Majors.  In fact, the Players’ Championship is in a virtual tie with the US Open for third.
There are now five Majors by MediaBuzz Concensus
There are now five Majors by MediaBuzz Consensus
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The Open Championship’s S-Brand Affiliation Index (147.59) was followed by the Masters at 106.62.  The US Open and Players Championships finished in a virtual tie for third at 90.74 and 90.17, respectively.  The Open Championship scored nearly twice as high as the PGA Championship (79.40).
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Ranklng the Golf Majors by Sports BAI 
1.  The British Open 147.59
2.  The Masters  106.62
3.  The US Open  90.74
4.  The Players  90.17
5′  The PGA  79.40
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“After forty years, the Players Championship has earned its place among the Major Golf Championships,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.   “Forty years is certainly an excellent vantage point to judge its worthiness. And the data has spoken.”
Payack added,  “Since 1860 The Open is the championship against which all future Majors would be judged.  Now over one hundred and fifty-years later, we see that it towers above all others in the world of golf.”  
In the early to mid 20th century, the Majors were considered to be those tournaments won by Bobby Jones during his historic 1930 season:  the US and British Amateurs, the Open Championship and the US Open. Later Jones’ own tournament, the Masters, gained in importance as did the Western Open (considered a Major by many for a number of decades) as the British PGA fell from favor.  As recently as 1960 there was no official recognition of the Majors, as such.
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For this analysis, GLM employed proprietary ‘algorithmic methodologies’ such as the Brand Affiliation Index.  The BAI computes and details the relative brand equity of people, products or events based on the analysis of global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate assessment at any point in time.  To do so, GLM analyzes the billions of pages on the Internet, millions of blogs, the top 175,000 global print and electronic media, as well as Twitter and new social media sources, as they emerge.
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GLM will perform another analysis following the conclusion of the 2013 Majors.
About Global Language Monitor:  “We Tell the World What the Web is Thinking”
Founded in Silicon Valley, Austin, Texas-based GLM collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com


Top Ten All-Time Bushisms: ‘Misunderestimate,’ ‘Mission Accomplished’ top list

Similar to US Presidential Historians, Re-evaluating the Bush Legacy

Austin, TX. April 25, 2013 – The official opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library at Southern Methodist University, has prompted US presidential historians to re-evaluate the Bush 43 term in office. The Gallop organization has noted his highest approval ratings since Katrina.

“Some historians are noting improvement in their appraisals of the Bush Presidency, especially since the Obama Administration has chosen to follow a number of Bush precedents including the use of drones, keeping Gitmo open, prosecuting the war in Afghanistan, and the like,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “In the same manner, we have re-evaluated President Bush’s most (jn)famous sayings, misstatements and malapropisms to see which have best withstood the test of time.”

President Obama has had his share of linguistic miscue and foibles, but new word creation has centered on his surname: Obamamania, Obamacare, etc.

The rankings were nominated by language observers the world over and then ranked with the help of the Global Language Monitor’s algorithmic methodologies that tracks words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the blogosphere, as well as new social media as they emerge.

Obama in Boston: “State of Grace” among his best orations

“Heal Our City” Service

Austin, Texas, April 18, 2013 — An emotional Barack Obama was at his best, once again, as the ‘Mourner-in-Chief’ at the Healing the City memorial service for victims of the Boston Marathon bombing on Thursday.

The President spoke in short crisp paragraphs, using expertly composed declarative sentences, shifting frequently  into imperative mood.

Two standard ‘easy-to-understand” English measurements both ranked among the highest ever scored by the President, similar to the Tuscon memorial service, and his Grant Park, ‘Yes, We Can’ victory speech.

The President’s words were dignified, stately, with many faith-related expressions, praising Boston as a world cultural center belonging to us all.

He singled out the three victims of the attack by name (Martin Richard, the eight-year old, with the  now-iconic smile, Krystle Campbell, who would have turn 30 this week, Lu Lingzi, the Chinese graduate student) as representative of the indomitable spirit typical of the commonwealth, city and the Boston Marathon.

The President concluded his oration quoting St Paul in the second book of  Timothy:  “God has not given us the spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love, and self-discipline.”

Obama ended with a solemn flourish praising the strength, resilience of the people, with the call to ‘finish the race’.

Paul JJ Payack

 

 

Top Tech Buzzwords Everyone Uses but Don’t Quite Understand (2013): ‘Big Data’ and ”Dark Data’

  

New top trending terms include:  Dark Data, Yottabytes, Heisenbug, 3-D printer, phablet, and presentism.


Austin, Texas, Weekend Release March 29-31, 2013 — ‘Big Data’ and ‘Dark Data’ are the Most Confusing Tech Buzzwords of the Decade (thus far) according to the  The Global Language Monitor.  ‘The Cloud’ slips to No. 3, followed by Yottabytes, and ‘The Next Big Thing”.   Rounding out the Top Ten are Heisenbug, 3-D Printer, Phablet, the acronym REST, and Web x.0 (replacing Web 2.0).
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Continuing as the most confusing acronym of the year, decade and now of the century:  SOA.
 
Gartner Big Data Analysis
Gartner Big Data Analysis

 

“High Tech buzzwords are now coming at us full speed from all corners as the ‘adorkable’ nerd is exiting the periphery — and is now is viewed as a societal asset,”   said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.   “New terms are bubbling forth at an ever increasing pace, driven in part, by the tremendous growth and accessibility of data.  Nowhere on the planet is this more evident than at SXSWi where the digital world intersects with those of music, film and pop culture.” 

The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, proprietary databases, as well as new social media as they emerge.  The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

The Most Confusing High Tech Buzzwords of the of the Second Decade of the 21st century, thus far (2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013) with commentary follow:

2013 Rank, Buzzword, Last Year’s rank
Big Data (1) — Soon Human Knowledge will be doubling every second.  ‘Big’ does not begin to describe what’s coming at us. 
  1. Dark Data’ begins to emerge, though you might not have noticed it because … it is ‘Dark Data’   (New) – ‘Big’ has begun to spin off its own superlatives.
  2. The Cloud (2) — All that data has got to go somewhere.  Hint:  it’s neither your phone nor your tablet.
  3. Yottabytes (New) – Showing up on lots of technologists’ radar lately:  a quadrillion gigabytes.
  4. The Next Big Thing (3) — A cliche rendered ever more meaningless but still on everyone’s tongue.
  5. Heisenbug (New) – A bug that disappears when you try to detect it , finally making the list after a steady ascent over the last decade.
  6. 3-D Printer (New) – Watch this space.  They’ve been used in CAD design for years and science fiction for decades — but now they are impinging upon everyday life. 
  7. Phablet (New) – The Next Big Thing? The odds are against it since consumer goods tend to evolve into single-purpose appliances.
  8. REST (New) – Representational State transfer is slowly climbing its way up the list.
  9. Web X.0 (5) — Formerly Web 2.0, 3.0, etc.
  10. Higgs Boson (3, Decade) —   The Higgs Boson is a hypothetical massive scalar elementary particle predicted to exist by the Standard Model of particle physics. OK, let’s just call it the God Particle.  
  11. CERN (7)  –  On a two-year hiatus (sabbatical in academic parlance) after only one year of operation.  At least the Earth is on a short reprieve from being swallowed the black hole it might accidentally create. 
  12. Presentism (New) – The ‘presentism of constant pings’ is how its put.. 
  13. Solar Max (8) — 2013 is the Solar Max.  In the 1850s telegraph wires melted.  Best not to shuck off the hype here.
The Most Confusing Tech Acronym of THE CENTURY:  SOA (Service Oriented Architecture), continuing its acrnym of the year, decade and now century reign.
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For reference, here is the  first decade (2000-2009) of the 21st century.
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The Most Confusing High Tech Buzzwords of the first decade (2000-2009) of the 21st century with Commentary follow:
  1. HTTP — HyperText Transfer Protocol is used for HTML (HyperText Markup Language) files. Not to be confused with text on too much Starbucks.
  2. Flash — As in Flash Memory.  “Flash’  is easier to say than “ I brought the report on my EEPROM chip with a thin oxide layer separating a floating gate and control gate utilizing Fowler-Nordheim electron tunneling”.
  3. God Particle – The Higgs boson, thought to account for mass.  The God Particle has eluded discovery since its existence was first postulated some thirty years ago.
  4. Cloud Computing – Distributing or accessing programs and services across the Internet. (The Internet is represented as a cloud.)
  5. Plasma (as in plasma TV) — Refers less often to blood products than to a kind of television screen technology that uses matrix of gas plasma cells, which are charged by differing  electrical voltages to create an image.
  6. IPOD – What the Alpha Whale calls his personal pod.  Actually, Apple maintains that the idea of the iPod was from the film 2001: A Space Odyssey.  The origin of the word IPAD is a completely different story.
  7. Megapixel – Either a really large picture element (pixel) or a whole mess of pixels.  Actually, one million pixels (that’s a lotta pixels) OK, what’s a pixel? Computer-ese for picture element.
  8. Nano – Widely used to describe anything  small as in nanotechnology.   Like the word ‘mini’ which originally referred to the red hues in Italian miniature paintings, the word nano- is ultimately derived from the ancient Greek word for ‘dwarf’.
  9. Resonate – Not the tendency of a system to oscillate at maximum amplitude, but the ability to relate to (or resonate with) a customer’s desires.
  10. Virtualization – Around since dinosaurs walked the planet (the late ‘70s) virtualization now applies to everything from infrastructures to I/O.
  11. Solution — Ever popular yet still an amorphous description of high tech packages of hardware, software and service
  12. Cookie — Without cookies with their ‘persistent state’ management mechanism the web as we know it, would cease to exist.
  13. Robust — No one quite knows what it means, but it’s good for your product to demonstrate robustness
  14. Emoticon   A smiley with an emotional component (from emotional icon).  Now, what’s a smiley? :’)
  15. De-duping – Shorthand for de-duplication, that is, removing redundant data from a system.
  16. Green washing – Repositioning your product so that its shortfalls are now positioned as environmental benefits:  Not enough power?  Just re-position as energy-saving.
  17. Buzzword Compliant — To include the latest buzzwords in literature about a product or service in order to make it ‘resonate’ with the customer.
  18. Petaflop — A thousand trillion (or quadrillion) floating point operations per second   Often mistaken as a comment on a failed program by an animal rights’ group.
  19. Hadron – A particle made of quarks bound together by the strong force; they are either mesons (made of one quark and one anti-quark) or baryons (made of three quarks).
  20. Large Hadron Collider – The ‘atom smasher’ located underground outside Geneva.  Primarily built to re-create the conditions of creation, 1 trillionth of a second after the Big Bang.


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