Twerk Top Television Word of the Year – 10th Annual Analysis

 

Tenth Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas, USA. September 27, 2013 (Updated).  The Global Language Monitor (GLM) today announced that “Twerk” is the Top Teleword of the Year followed by “Tread lightly,” “Facial profiling,” “Posh Soap,” and “Valar Morghulis”.   Rounding out the top ten were “Jersey Shore,” “Honey Boo Boo,” “Royal Baby,” “Space jump,” and “@Pontifex”.

The awards are announced in conjunction with the Primetime Emmy awards at the beginning of the Fall television season in the US. This is the tenth annual analysis by Austin-based GLM. 

“This is the first time we are recognizing words and phrases from all four screens of contemporary communications:  the television, the computer, the tablet and the smart phone.  Accordingly, this year’s words have originated (and spread) from any of the devices to the others ” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. “This year’s list reflects the massive, never ceasing, continuing flow of information bombarding people the world over.”

The Top Telewords of the 2012-2013 season with commentary follow:

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The Ambush Marketing Race to the Sochi Olympics is on!

 

P&G, Samsung and GE lead Worldwide Partners but trail Philips, Siemens and Adidas

Ten of the top 15 spots are occupied by the Non-affiliated Marketers

The race to the Rio Summer Olympics (2016) is not far behind

 

Sochi Ambush Marketing Report Image

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AUSTIN, Texas August 30 – September 2, 2013 — Six months out, the race for the Top Marketers of the Sochi Winter Olympics is in full swing. And the race to the Rio Summer Olympics of 2016 is not far behind, according to the “Sochi 2014 Ambush Marketing Outlook” report released by the Global Language Monitor (GLM), the brand equity trend tracking firm. P&G, Samsung and GE lead the Worldwide Partners but trail Non-affiliated Marketers Philips, Siemens and Adidas. When measured by GLM’s proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI),10 of the top 15 spots are occupied by the Non-affiliated Marketers – with the bottom five spots all held by top sponsors. The longitudinal study began in July 2011 and tracks the top Worldwide Partners as designated by the Sochi Organizing Committee (SOC) and IOC.

The Global Language Monitor has been conducting brand audits of the top Olympic sponsors and their unaffiliated competitors since the Beijing Summer Games.

In the study conducted throughout August, three brands among Sochi’s ten Worldwide Olympic Partners, P&G, Samsung and GE have already achieved significant brand affiliation with Sochi, while McDonald’s, Panasonic and Coca-Cola had some brand affiliation. The Sochi Winter Olympics have ten Worldwide Olympic Partners: Atos Origin, Coca-Cola, Dow Chemical, General Electric, McDonald’s, Omega watches. Panasonic, Procter & Gamble (P&G), Samsung, and Visa Card.

For these rankings GLM measured the strength of the brand affiliation for each official Olympic sponsor against those of their primary non-affiliated competitors. Though ‘ambush marketing’ is well understood to mean an organization knowingly exploiting a brand affiliation with the Games without the benefit of official sponsorship, all perceived Olympic affiliations according to their presence in the global media, and statistically linked to the the particular event, qualify for GLM’s Ambush Marketing rankings.

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Is Dufnering a ‘real’ Word?

For Immediate Release

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com

It is, indeed — because the global community of English Speakers has deemed it to be. 

AUSTIN, Texas,  August 15 — Dufnering can now be considered an English-language word, simply because the global community of English Speakers has deemed it to be. And the Global Language Monitor agrees.  Other words of recent sports vintage include vuveleza, tebowing, and linsanity.

“In a matter of days, dufnering, defined as appearing to be in a semi-conscious state,  oblivious to the people and activities around oneself, can be found in hundreds of thousands of citations the world over,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

GLM recognizes additions to the English language once they pass the following set of criteria: at least 25,000 citations in the global print and electronic media, with the requisite depth (appearing in a wide range and modes of communication) and geographic breadth.   Dufnering met these criteria earlier this week after Jason Dufner won the 2013 PGA Champonship at the Oak Hill Country Club outside Rochester, New York.  It is perhaps ironic that Dufnering first appeared in 2011 when Jason Dufner gained some notoriety after losing a playoff at the 2011 PGA Championship to his (now) good friend Keegan Bradley.

Dufnering is yet another eponym in the long list of English language words taken from actual person’s names.

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Phony, the Optic, and Brycgwyrcende* join the battle for 2013 Top Word of the Year

Top Trending Words of 2013, Mid-year Edition

AUSTIN, Texas, August 8, 2013 – The words ‘phony’, ‘the Optic’, and ‘Brycgwyrcende’* have joined the battle for 2013 Top Word of the Year, according to the Global Language Monitor, the world leader in big data language analytics.

The Mid-year outlook for the Top Trending Words of 2013 already include words related to:   Kate’s Royal Offspring,  Near-Earth Objects including Comets, asteroids and/or meteors,  Nukes (rogue or otherwise), a fascinating Internet meme (or two), China continuing in it role as the world’s economic engine, an unknown technical buzzword that will seemingly spring out of nowhere (ala #hashtag), and various catastrophic scenarios with names containing the prefix  franken- or the suffix – pocalypse 

These words have been compiled from word trends in global English currently tracked by the Global Language Monitor.  In December 2012, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that ‘ Apocalypse’ was the Top Word, ‘Gangnam Style’ the Top Phrase; and ‘Newtown’ and ‘Malala (Yousafzai) the Top Names of 2012 in its  annual global analysis of the English language.

“With 1.83 billion speakers and a new word created every 98 minutes or so, clever, interesting, and creative neologisms inevitably appear — and now from any point on the planet,”  said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.

To see the Top Words of 2012, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate).

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OK, So It’s a Boy; Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists)

OK, So It’s a Boy;  Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists)

A Tight  List With a Sudden Re-emergence of Traditional Names as Trendy

July 23, 2013  Austin, TEXAS — The Top Internet Media-buzzed Male Royal Baby Names (plus UK, US & AUS Trendlists) The Top Royal Baby’s Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet.  This is an update to that story.

For the analysis, GLM examined a score of masculine names most associated with the British Throne since A.D. 1700.  GLM then cross-referenced them with names associated with the royal birth according to global Internet  MediaBuzz.  Finally, since Prince William and the former Kate Middleton seem to have a penchant for the latest fashion, GLM then cross-referenced the Classic Royal Names withe the top male  baby names in the UK, US, and Australia for 2012.

The Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) ranks the names according to their association with the royal birth.

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Top Royal Baby Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet

Speculation for Girl over Boy:   64%-36%

Alexandra No. 1 for Classic Royal Names

Amelia, Charlotte, Emma and variants of Elisabeth among the more popular girls names

July 22, 2013  (Updated) Austin, TEXAS — Last week the Global Language Monitor announced the Top Royal Baby’s Names Most Buzzed About on the Internet.  This is an update to that story.

For the analysis, GLM examined three dozen feminine names from the British royal lineage over the last 200 years and then cross-referenced them with names associated with the royal birth  in Internet  MediaBuzz.  Since Prince William and the former Kate Middleton seem to have a penchant for the latest fashion, GLM then cross-referenced the Classic Royal Names withe the top girls baby names in the UK, US, and Australia for 2012.

Members of the British Royal Family often carry several names, as many as four or five are in contention. Queen Elizabeth’s full Christian name is Elizabeth Alexandra Mary. while Price William’s is William Arthur Philip Louis.

In the analysis, GLM searched hundreds of millions of Internet sources, the blogosphere, the top 250,000 electronic and media sites, as well as social media sources, as they emerge.  The analysis was completed earlier this week.

The Top Classic Royal Female Names according to Internet MediaBuzz

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Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

Read: Why the Flutie Effect is Real (Harvard Business Review)

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Big Ten Tops, SEC Most improved

Both New Big East Conferences Tumble

 

Austin, TX July 4th Weekend – July 4th might be Independence Day, but July 1st, was Conference Realignment Day when dozens of college and universities landed in what they hope to be greener pastures. The Global Language Monitor, analyzed pre-2012 conference configurations and compared them with their new membership additions or deletions.

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

  1. The Big Ten continues to rank first in academic reputation.
  2. Ohio State was the top ranked school in the Big 10.
  3. The PAC 12 lost ground with Utah, but is now just slightly behind the ACC.
  4. If included in the rankings the academically renowned Ivy League would have bested the Big Ten and the Patriot League would be in a virtual tie with the Big Ten.
  5. The Atlantic Coast Conference was a close No. 2, pulling within ten percent of the leader.
  6. The Southeast Conference was the most improved after adding two academic stars (Texas A&M and Mizzou).
  7. Both the New and Old Big East (Big East and American Athletic) conferences fell by about 20% each
  8. The academic reputation of the Big 12 remained virtually unchanged, after taking the hit with the loss of Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado and A&M.
  9. The ACC gains with the addition of Pitt and Syracuse but will pull back a bit in 2014 with the addition of Louisville.
  10. The Big Ten will grow even stronger with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland.

Let’s adopt that de-dictionaried 63-letter German word into English

Dropping a word from a dictionary does not unmake a word

 

Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz

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Austin, Texas, June 5, 2013  –  Earlier this week, it was revealed that the Duden dictionary of ‘Correct German Spelling’  had dropped Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz from its latest edition.

“Dropping a word from a dictionary does not unmake a word,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Wonk of the Global Language Monitor.   “It’s simply a question of how frequently a word is used factored by its depth and breadth of use.   A modest proposal might be to  simply add #Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz to the English language.  After all, English is classified as a ‘Germanic’ language, and about a quarter of our words have Germanic  roots”.

 

Click below to hear the pronunciation of Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz:

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Common German words that we’ve adopted into English include:

  • blitz
  • Doppelgänger
  • wurst
  • schadenfreude
  • zeitgeist
  • kindergarten
  • dreck

So why not Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz?

Even if it refers to a repealed law, even if it literally means “law for the delegation of monitoring beef labeling”,   English is quite adaptable and  the world’s 1.83 billion English speakers could evolve its current meaning in any number of ways, not to mention the memes and Gifs it could spawn.

Granted it will be rather difficult to stuff into a 140-character Tweet.

As a public service we;ve created  a sample tweet for you:  Let’s adopt the expunged #German word #Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz into #English @LanguageMonitor.

English already has about a million words and adds s about 14.7 new words a day, so there is definitely room for one more.

 

 

Obama and the null set narrative

Reprinted from The Hill, May 31, 2009

Obama and the null set narrative

By Paul JJ Payack

We have been analyzing the narrative of Barack Obama for some years now. In fact, we’ve tracked three differing narratives in the course of his campaign and the first term of his presidency. We’ve tracked the president’s highs (the “Yes we can!” Grant Park Speech, and others of soaring rhetoric), and his lows (the much more pedestrian Gulf Oil Spill effort).

We’ve been praised for our astute analysis, and condemned for announcing his premature political death. At the time, the Global Language Monitor’s analysis of the BP Oil Spill speech was actually pulled off CNN and replaced by a far milder critique. In retrospect, that speech was a harbinger of what was to come — Barack Obama bereft of Hope and Change.

Not that we didn’t have hints about of what was about to transpire. Consider the disposition of these “hope-and-change type” promises: (1) the immediate shutdown of Guantanamo, (2) the end of the K Street revolving door and (3) holding the bankers accountable for their part in the financial meltdown. How exactly do you make sense of these countervailing (or even contradictory) positions?

Obama and the null set narrative.

Now consider the president’s recent speech on U.S. defense policy: after ramping up the use of drones against “enemy combatants,” with hundreds of civilians deaths by the administration’s own estimate, he stands firmly against gratuitous drone strikes. After keeping Gitmo open for going on five years now, he will now do everything in his power to close it. How to make sense of these seemingly oppositional positions?

The null set narrative.

In the run-up to the 2010 midterms, we began to formally track the president’s narrative. We were curious to better understand how the word ‘narrative’ rose to be the No. 1 political buzzword at that time and what it meant to this presidency. Other terms frequently used to describe Obama at the time, included: detached, aloof, hands-off or professorial. Some took these words to be demeaning and/or insulting.

Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “The danger comes when politicians and their operatives essentially use ‘narrative’ … the version of the truth that they want us to believe even when they don’t believe it.”

Since his reelection last November, we have remained silent on the subject — awaiting the second term narrative to emerge. With the recent series of crises, scandals and/or events, we now are, indeed, witnessing this new narrative: the null set narrative.

Consider, if you will, the current plight of one Jay Carney.

It is always interesting how one’s attributes can be used to praise or condemn depending on the narrative in which they are described.

However, this is a narrative that can fit around any news, story or scandal; more to the point, it is completely irrelevant to the words ensconced within it. Any words, anytime, anywhere. This is the narrative of choice for the administration at this point in time.

And now detached, aloof, and hands-off are the favored phrases in this administration’s null set narrative.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/the-administration/302749-obama-and-the-null-set-narrative#ixzz2UuzupYr7

 

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