College Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum

Rank

Overall

1

Bard College, NY

10

2

Colorado College, CO

1

3

Harvey Mudd College, CA

45

4

Wesleyan University, CT

37

5

St Olaf College, MN

40

6

Grinnell College, IA

29

7

Holy Cross, MA

38

8

Gettysburg College, PA

39

9

Claremont McKenna, CA

43

10

St Lawrence, NY

47

11

Drew University, NJ

33

12

Occidental College, CA

28

13

Davidson College, NC

25

14

Southwestern U., TX

48

15

Skidmore College, NY

41

16

U. of Richmond, VA

7

17

Middlebury College, VT

6

18

Furman University, SC

42

19

Trinity College, CT

22

20

Macalester College, MN

54

21

Reed College, OR

34

22

Amherst College, MA

3

23

Connecticut College, CT

26

24

Whitman College, WA

44

25

Wellesley College, MA

4

26

Colgate University, NY

17

27

DePauw University, IN

35

28

Centre College, KY

46

29

Lafayette College, PA

19

30

Colby College, ME

27

31

Pomona College, CA

28

32

Scripps College, CA

50

33

Barnard College, NY

18

34

Kenyon College, OH

31

35

Swarthmore College, PA

13

36

Bucknell University, PA

12

37

Haverford College, PA

30

38

Bates College, ME

32

39

Hamilton College, NY

15

40

Dickinson College, PA

23

54

Mount Holyoke, MA

20

41

Union College, NY

8

42

Washington & Lee, PA

36

43

Smith College, MA

14

44

Williams College, MA

2

45

Oberlin College, OH

5

46

Bryn Mawr College, PA

16

47

Vassar College, NY

9

48

Franklin & Marshall, PA

49

49

Carleton College, MN

24

50

Bowdoin College, ME

11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.



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TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings April 2009

      For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.       For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.       For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.


Liberal Arts Colleges

Colorado nips Williams, followed by Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, and Oberlin

Middlebury, Richmond, Union, Vassar and Bard in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008. Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days. The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm. To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Rank

1

Colorado College, CO

2

Williams College, MA

3

Amherst College, MA

4

Wellesley College, MA

5

Oberlin College, OH

6

Middlebury College, VT

7

University of Richmond, VA

8

Union College, NY

9

Vassar College, NY

10

Bard College, NY

11

Bowdoin College, ME

12

Bucknell University, PA

13

Swarthmore College, PA

14

Smith College, MA

15

Hamilton College, NY

16

Bryn Mawr College, PA

17

Colgate University, NY

18

Barnard College, NY

19

Lafayette College, PA

20

Mount Holyoke College, MA

21

Pomona College, CA

22

Trinity College, CT

23

Dickinson College, PA

24

Carleton College, MN

25

Davidson College, NC

26

Connecticut College, CT

27

Colby College, ME

28

Occidental College, CA

29

Grinnell College, IA

30

Haverford College, PA

31

Kenyon College, OH

32

Bates College, ME

33

Drew University, NJ

34

Reed College, WA

35

DePauw University, IN

36

Washington & Lee University, PA

37

Wesleyan University, CT

38

College of the Holy Cross, MA

39

Gettysburg College, PA

40

St Olaf College, MN

54

Macalester College, MN

41

Skidmore College, NY

42

Furman University, SC

43

Claremont McKenna College, CA

44

Whitman College, WA

45

Harvey Mudd College, CA

46

Centre College, KY

47

St Lawrence University, NY

48

Southwestern University, TX

49

Franklin and Marshall College, PA

50

Scripps College, NY

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

Previous benchmark was in aftermath of 9/11 attacks

.

Austin, TX March 24, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that the word ‘outrage’ has been used more in the global media this week than anytime this century. The previous benchmark was in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The analysis of the global printed and electronic media was concluded earlier today. 

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact.  The amount of anger and outrage as reflected in the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

In particular, the word has been quoted in association with the uproar over the AIG bonuses, as having been used by President Obama, his senior staff, members of congress, commentators, and ordinary citizens at large.  The GLM analysis included global print and electronic media since the turn of the 21st century. 

GLM examined word usage in the seven days following significant events including, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, the start of the Iraq War in 2003, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in September 2005.  The analysis included global print and electronic media. 

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media: 

1. AIX Bonuses, 2009

2. the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

Earlier GLM had reported that words of despair and fear have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s election as president of the United States on November 4, 2008, with examples abound, including  catastrophe,  depression, as in full-blown or impending disaster, collapse, and crisis, among many others.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

Editorial, March 4 2009

One million. These days, with billions in bailouts and trillions in debts, a million of anything doesn’t seem like all that much.

But a million English words? Hat and cat and poll and prestidigitation?

Sure, the dictionary’s full of words. But a regular Webster’s has only about 200,000 words in it. And the gold standard of English dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary, which comes in volumes, contains only about 600,000. And the average American’s vocabulary? 20,000 words. Ouch

Obviously, the Global Language Monitor knows more than the Oxford folks. That’s the organization contending English will add its one millionth word sometime next month

The group can’t, of course, foretell what that word will be. Maybe it’ll be a kid word, like “janky,” also sometimes spelled “jainky” or “jinky.” (These things are always fluid.) It apparently means anything from “substandard” to “weird” and often relates to other people. “That guy is sure janky!”

Superlatives are often expressed in new-slang: “Wooka,” for instance, is said to be the hottest way to say “Wow!” And “nang” means “absolutely fantastic!”

The Urban Dictionary, an online and hard-bound resource for slang- sensitive people, tries to keep current as the vernacular evolves. This is not easy; it offers a new word each day. “Gank,” it says, means “to steal.” “I didn’t have any money, so I ganked it.”

“Yinz” is the new way to say “y’all,” “you guys” or “you.”

“Janhvi” is a really amazing person who knows how to be a great friend

English has absorbed a variety of computer geekisms: “lol,” meaning “laugh out loud,” and, a kid-related warning, “prw,” meaning, “parents are watching.” And, by the way, “geek” itself is so far “out” of the argot that it has turned up in the dictionary. And it has a possible origin: It might be an alteration of the Low German “gek.” That’s pretty establishment

Of course, most of the words mentioned here have undoubtedly vanished from the patois, never to pass young lips again. As soon as adults become aware of a new slang word, you can bet it’s no longer “in,” “hot,” “with it.”

It’s sooooo lame, as nobody would say anymore.

The Hills Medical Group Becomes Austin’s First Christian Medical Clinic

The Hills Medical Group (THMG) Becomes Austin’s First Christian Medical Clinic  

Now Associated with Deep River Ministries

 

Austin, TEXAS, March 6, 2014 – The Hills Medical Group is Austin’s first Christ Medical Healing Center through its new association with the Deep River Ministries (DRM) of San Antonio. DRM is a Christian interdenominational church founded by Rev. Dr. Jack Sheffield. Specifically, because of its association with DRM’s Christ Healing Center, The Hills Medical Group (THMG) is now able to bring God deeper into the healing process to help combat the spiritual component of any illness.

“The Hills Medical Group has long been associated with innovative and breakthrough healing techniques, including alternative, naturopathic, and holistic health treatments as well as complementary conventional treatments,” said Dr. Ted Edwards, known as the Father of Wellness in Texas. “With this new association with the Christ Healing Center we now have another point of distinction: the first Medical Healing Center appointed by Deep River Ministries.

This makes The Hills Medical Group not only a leading holistic health & alternative treatments clinic, but also a medical group where prayer becomes an even more active, integral part of the healing process.

THMG uses patients’ own biochemical information to develop a course of treatment that will allow the body to heal itself. The goal is to limit chronic use of prescription drugs and to use nutrients and natural detoxifiers to promote natural healing.

As alternative treatment and modalities become increasingly widespread, THMG works to treat the whole patient –body, mind and spirit. Since stress on the mind, causes stress on the body, HMG’s treatments are designed to identify and address those areas of weakness.

In addition to their professional specialties, all three associated in the practice are ordained Christian ministers.

Hills Medical Group Staff:

Ted L. Edwards, Jr., M.D., has been treating patients in Austin since 1964. He is an internist with extensive training in Internal Medicine, Anti-aging Modalities and Gastroenterology. He has served the medical profession and Austin community over the years as Chairman of the Texas Medical Association Section on Digestive Disease, Team Physician and Chairman of Sports Medicine for the U.S. Cycling Federation, Chief of Staff at Holy Cross Hospital and Chairman of the Texas Governor’s Commission on Physical Fitness.

His pioneering concept of “Wellness” led to the honorary title of “The Father of Wellness in Texas” during his tenure as Chairman of the Texas Governor’s Commission on Physical Fitness. In addition to serving the community, he is an acclaimed author and radio talk show host. Dr. Edwards has written two books, Power Aging and Weight Loss to Super Wellness. He has educated the public through his radio show and has been a featured speaker on the topics of Alternative Medicine, Gastroenterology and Wellness.

Dr. Edwards is ordained and believes deeply that the power of prayer, gratitude and forgiveness is essential to healing. Prayer is offered and encouraged as part of the healing process.

Terri M. Beim, N.D. is a certified Naturopathic and Holistic Healthcare Practitioner and has been in practice since 2001. The goal of her consultation is to help the whole person in identifying their particular health challenge and then re-establishing the body’s balance by removing the obstacles to health & encouraging the body’s natural healing process. She is first and foremost an educator, spending an extensive amount of time with each client on their particular body chemistry, toxic loads, diet, lifestyle, and the subsequent health challenges faced by that person.

Specialties include food sensitivities/allergies, gluten sensitivity, and candida overgrowth. She is able to offer the most effective protocols available for dealing with these issues as well as providing the required education to the patient in order to insure a successful outcome. Additionally, she is able to assist with natural hormone balancing, optimizing immune function, nutritional deficiencies, detoxification, and various other therapies aimed at helping the human body return to the natural state of homeostasis.

She is ordained and believes in the power of prayer and offers prayer as well as spiritual guidance as part of the healing process.

I. Harrison Moore, M.D. is a board certified Family Practice Physician, eligible with the Board of Clinical Metal Toxicology and a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and DAN certified for autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Moore has provided care for over 30 years to adults and children. In years of practicing, he has treated entire families from birth to end of life in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, geriatrics, internal and hospital medicine.

Dr. Moore’s care is patient centered, meaning that he focuses on the person, not the diagnosis or disease. Many patients come in with vague, unusual and often chronic symptoms that their doctors have not been able to figure out. They are often worn out and discouraged from just trying to get someone in the medical establishment to listen to them. Dr. Moore often hears that “all my labs are normal’ but they don’t feel “normal.” He listens to his patients and values their input. He feels it’s important to establish a good rapport and a trusting relationship with a patient.

Specialties include thyroid disorders, natural hormone balancing, persistent fatigue, anti-aging, insomnia, GI issues, toxic metals, high blood pressure, cardiovascular health, osteoporosis, autism, ADD/ADHD, low immunity, chronic illness, and optimum well child visits.

Additionally, he is ordained and offers prayer as part of the healing process upon request.

About the Hills Medical Group

The Hills Medical Group is Austin’s premier naturopathic holistic health & alternative treatments clinic and also a house of healing prayer, where prayer becomes an active, integral part of the healing process.

The Hills Medical Group | Center for Health and Healing,
4201 Bee Caves Road, Suite B112, West Lake Hills, Texas 78746
Website: http://www.centerforhealthandhealing.org
Phone: 512-327-4886. Email: info@poweraging.com

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Enhances College Reputation

TrendTopper enhances college reputation by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year, go here.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

For More Information about our reputation management services, please call 1.512.815.8836, or send email to pauljjpayack@gmail.com.



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Top HollyWords of 2008

<img src=”http://tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:_HaTE6bSZjWugM:http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/11/06/magazine/11safire600.1.jpg” alt=”” />
<h3>‘Jai Ho!’ and ‘Slumdog’ top HollyWORDs of 2008</h3>
<h3>followed by ‘Hmong,’ ‘Nuke the Fridge’ and ‘Twinkie defense’</h3>
<h3></h3>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>6th Annual Survey by the Global Language Monitor</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span> </span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>Austin, TX. February 26, 2009.<span>  </span>‘Jai Ho!’ and ‘Slumdog’ from Slumdog Millionaire top the 2008 list of words from Hollywood that most influenced the English Language in 2008.<span>  </span>Closely following were ‘Hmong’ fromGran Torino, ‘Nuke the Fridge’ from Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull and ‘Twinkie defense’ (which followed the events depicted in Milk).<span>  </span><span> </span>It was the first time that two words from the same movie were ranked in the Top Ten.<span>  </span>Rounding out the Top Ten were:<span>  </span>‘Djembe’ (The Visitor), “There are no coincidences” (Kung Fu Panda), ‘What doesn’t kill you makes you … stranger,” (The Dark Knight), Posthumous (The Wrestler), and Katrina from Benjamin Button.</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>“2008 was a remarkable year for words in films, with a Hindi phrase, the name of a Laotian tribe, a West African drum, and a modified quotation from Frederick Nietzsche all making the list,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.<span> </span></span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>The Top Hollywords of the 2008 with commentary follow.</span></p>

<ol type=”1″>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Jai Ho! (Slumdog Millionaire) – Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi.</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Slumdog (Slumdog Millionaire) – Definitely a politically incorrect term for young slum-dwellers in Bombay (Mumbai).</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Nuke the Fridge (Indiana Jones and the ) – Indiana Jones surviving a nuclear blast in a lead-lined fridge is viewed as proof that the franchise has run its course (similar to Fonzi’s Jump the Shark episode on Happy Days).</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Hmong (Gran Torino) – The name of the mountain-dwelling peoples of Laos who were US Allies in the Indochinese Wars of the 1960-70s.<span>  </span>Pronounced with a silent ‘h’:<span>  </span>mong.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Twinkie Defense (Milk) – The apocryphal outcome of the trial 1979 trial of Dan White, the former San Francisco Supervisor who killed both Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.<span>  </span>The term was never actually used in the trial but was picked up in the media as a stand-in for ‘diminished capacity’.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Djembe (The Visitor) – West African percussion instrument that Tarek teaches Walter.</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>There are no coincidences (Kung Fu Panda) – Oogway’s solemn pronouncement to Master Shifu</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>What doesn’t kill you makes you … stranger (The Dark Knight) – The Joker’s twist on the famous Nietzsche epigram.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Posthumous (The Wrestler) – Yes, that really was Mickey Rourke as a Best Actor nominee, well after he had been pronounced dead many a time.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Katrina (Benjamin Button) – The ominous and pervasive threat of Katrina framing the movie demonstrates the depth to which the hurricane has penetrated the American subconscious.</span></span></li>
</ol>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span> </span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>Previous Top HollyWord Winners:</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2007<span>     </span>“Call it, Friendo,” from “No Country for Old Men”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2006<span>     </span>“High Five!!! Its sexy time!’ from “Borat!”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2005<span>     </span>‘Brokeback’ from “Brokeback Mountain”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2004<span>     </span>“Pinot” from “Sideways”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2003<span>     </span>‘’Wardrobe malfunction” from Super Bowl XXXVIII</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases.<span>  </span>The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.<span>  </span></span></p>

<

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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TrendTopper enhances college reputation news

TrendTopper enhances college reputation

.

by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

 

 

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education.  Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas.  TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media.  TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.  

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues.  These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

       We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?

       How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?

       We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?

       We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?

       We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?

       Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here? 

 

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year.  The next Internet Rankings will be announced in April, 2009

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest. 

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@GlobalLanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.



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Global Economic Restructuring


Name current crisis, ‘Global Economic Restructuring’

To more precisely describe current economic condition

To remove emotional freight from the debate

Austin, TX February 17, 2009 – Earlier this month we noted that words of despair and fear of the Global Economic Meltdown have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s Election as President of the United States on November 4, 2008.The period of the analysis covered 90 days, ending February 3, 2009.

Since that time, the language describing the current financial situation from the administration, the congress and the pundits as reflected in the Global Media has become even more severe.Even a cursory review of the contemporary media bears this out.The favored descriptions include:

  • Catastrophe,
  • Depression, as in full-blown or impending
  • Disaster,
  • Collapse, asin Total
  • Meltdown,
  • Tsunami, as in Financial Tsunami,
  • Crisis,
  • Unprecedented, and
  • Panic, among others.

When describing the entire cycle — from years of deregulation to the housing bubble to the banking bailout and credit squeeze — the emerging consensus seems to be ‘financial meltdown’.Earlier, ‘financial tsunami,’ was favored by some because it aptly described the suddenness, the violence, and the unexpected nature of the potential ‘collapse’ of the global financial system.

However, thus far no description satisfies the two criteria that are called for here: 1) to adequately describe the enormity of the situation, and (2) to do so in an objective, non-emotional manner.

History, of course, will have the ultimate say in the matter.And History usually settles on the dispassionate.All the contemporary names for the conflict between the American North and the South in 1861-1865 yielded simply to the Civil War over time, Just as The Great War yielded to World War I, and subsequently, World War II.

GLM was founded, in part, to identify political buzzwords as ordinary words that become ‘loaded’ or fraught with emotional content far beyond the normal definition of the word.

In this case we also feel it incumbent to note that calling our current economic plight a Depression, certainly might be true – if after 12 years our unemployment rate hovers around 25%, some 10,000 banks have collapsed, and the Dow Jones suffers a 90% decline as was the case in the Great depression.

Also, there was a real question if Western Capitalism would survive at all.At that time Communism (and not garden-variety Socialism) and Fascism were considered to be in competition with free enterprise Capitalism, and the outcome was by no means settled.(Such was the nature of the ‘fear’ to which President Roosevelt referred.) This is certainly, not the case today, where the global consensus overwhelmingly favors free enterprise, in its various shapes and forms, to be the key to long-lasting global prosperity.

Therefore, GLM is suggesting that the current crisis be labeled, simply, the Global Economic Restructuring, thereby more precisely describing the current global economic condition and, at the same time, to removing some of the emotional freight from the debate.

– Paul JJ Payack, Editor

‘Despair’ & ‘fear’ drowning out ‘Hope’ in Global Media

Comparison of 90-days since election to 9/11 and Start of Iraq War

Austin, TX February 10, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown are drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008.

With thousands of global headlines centering on the deteriorating global economy followed by news of the human toll of people driven to despair and committing acts of desperation, GLM undertook an analysis of the language used in the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election.GLM then compared their frequency of use to the ninety days following the 9/11 Terrorists attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and the 90-day period following the outbreak of the Iraq War in 2003.The representative fear-related words chosen:Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate/Desperation.

The analysis found that these words were used in the last ninety days with 18-23% more frequency since the historic Obama election than when compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.The one exception was that of the word fear, itself, though its use in relation to the economic meltdown was still some 85% of its use in the case of 9/11 and the Iraq War.

“The results are striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Omama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in,” ” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

The specific breakdown of the keywords (and related variations) follows:

1.Abandoned — Abandoned appeared some 23% more frequently

2.Despair — Despair appeared some 18% more frequently

3.Desperation – Desperation appeared some 18% more frequently

4.Fear – Fear appeared some 85% of the frequency

 
Media and Analysts:  Call for Graphics

The US Presidential Election and the Financial Tsunami

Seemingly chaotic events reflect normalcy of new reality

A Historical Inflection Point

Austin, Texas, USA.October 13, 2008. The worldwide financial tsunami that has captured the attention of the worldwide media (as well as governments, corporations and ordinary citizens), has come to dominate one of the great quadrennial media events of the post-Modern era.No, we are not referring to the Olympics, most recently held in Beijing, or even football’s World Cup but, rather, the US Presidential elections.

The immediate effect of this unprecedented upheaval of global markets is the obfuscation of the clear lines of division offered by the opposing parties in the US Presidential Elections.

There is the sense that we are witnessing an unprecedented historical event; historical in the sense that we now appear to be standing astride (or atop) a cusp in history, a delta, a decision point, what is now called a point of inflection or inflection point.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us.

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the Tsunami washing over the planet at a steady speed and ever-quicker pace.Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t change at all.It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality:News now emanates at the speed of thought, from tens of thousands or, even, millions of sources.

The nature of a Tsunami is little understood other than the tremendous damage it unleashes when it washes ashore.What we do know, however, is that a tsunami travels in exceedingly long waves (tens of kilometers in length) racing through the oceanic depths at hundreds of kilometers per hour.Only upon reaching the shore is its true destructive power unleashed for all to see (if they survive to witness it at all).

In the same manner, the traditional media become transfixed with the roiling surface seas but fail to acknowledge the more sustained and significant, movements occurring just beneath the surface.

The surface swirls about in fascinating eddies, but the true transformation is occurring as the nearly undetectable waves rush through the open sea only occasionally, though dramatically, making their way onto shore.

In the same manner, the traditional media focuses on the Twenty-four-hour News Cycle but seem to miss the strong and prevalent currents immediately beneath the surface.They vainly attempt to tie global, transformative, and unprecedented events to relatively parochial events and forces (the Reagan Years, the Clinton administration, Bush 41 and 43, the de-regulation initiatives of Alan Greenspan of ‘99) that are being all but over-shadowed (and –whelmed) by unyielding and all-but irresistible forces.

There is an almost palpable sense and correct sense that things are 1) changing forever, 2) out of our control (or even influence), and 3) will have a direct impact upon the planet for generations to follow.

What we can control, and make sense of, however, is a candidate’s wink, smirk or disdainful reference.We can emphatically pin down our opponents into convenient sound bites, hopefully contradicting earlier sound bites.Do you personally take responsibility for Climate Change?(Does the fact that New York City was beneath 5,000 feet of Ice a few dozen centuries ago influence your vote today? A yes or no will suffice!)Is your personal philosophy, whatever it might be, grounded in a belief system that I can systematically debunk and demean.(Yes or no.)Are you for or against atom smashers creating miniscule black holes that may or may not swallow up the Earth?(Answer yes and you are a barbarian; answer no and you have absolutely no respects of the future prospects of the human race.)Did you ever consider yourself a loser (at any point in your life)?Did you ever make the acquaintance of fellow losers?

Nevertheless, the US Presidential Election will proceed to its own conclusion on the first Tuesday of November in the year two thousand and eight.

For the preceding five years, The Global Language Monitor has attempted to clarify the course (and future course) of human events as documented in the English language.

The tools at our disposal have sometimes allowed us to peer into events and trends that become, otherwise, obscured, by the ‘noise’ of the Twenty-four Hour News Cycle.

Our goal was, and continues to be, to extricate (and explicate upon) the true currents underpinning the events we call news, and to better understand what they mean and how they are perceived with the new media reality in mind.

For example, back in the days preceding the 2004 Presidential election cycle, GLM discovered the fact that once ideas, words and phrases were launched into the vast, uncharted, oceanic Internet, they do not, indeed, die out after twenty-four hours but, rather, travel in deep, powerful currents and waves (not unlike those of a tsunami) that only grow stronger as they make their ways to distant shores.

In this new reality, tsunami-like ideas pass through vast seas of information of the Internet, nearly undetected and often unmeasured, until they crash upon our shorelines, where their full power (and possibly fury) is unleashed.

The fact that we only entertain them for 24 hours before they are dispatched into the archives of what is considered ‘past’ or ‘passed’ and readily discarded, is beyond the point.

We often hear that ‘we’ve never seen anything like this’ before.Of course not.Think back a few hundred years to other information revolutions, such as that introduced along with mechanical type.What do you think the fortunate few thought when they first laid their eyes upon the works of Aristotle, the Bible, or the Arabic translations of Euclid?No one had ever seen anything like that before!Indeed.

And astonishment will only become more so as the future unfolds.

– Paul JJ Payack, President & Chief Word Analyst, The Global Language Monitor

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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‘Despair’ & ‘fear’ drowning out ‘Hope’ in Global Media

Comparison of 90-days since election to 9/11 and Start of Iraq War

 

Austin, TX February 10, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown are drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008. 

With thousands of global headlines centering on the deteriorating global economy followed by news of the human toll of people driven to despair and committing acts of desperation, GLM undertook an analysis of the language used in the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election.  GLM then compared their frequency of use to the ninety days following the 9/11 Terrorists attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and the 90-day period following the outbreak of the Iraq War in 2003.  The representative fear-related words chosen:  Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate/Desperation.

The analysis found that these words were used in the last ninety days with 18-23% more frequency since the historic Obama election than when compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.  The one exception was that of the word fear, itself, though its use in relation to the economic meltdown was still some 85% of its use in the case of 9/11 and the Iraq War.

“The results are striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Omama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in,” ” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor. 

 

The specific breakdown of the keywords (and related variations) follows:

 

1. Abandoned — Abandoned appeared some 23% more frequently

2. Despair — Despair appeared some 18% more frequently

3. Desperation – Desperation appeared some 18% more frequently

4. Fear – Fear appeared some 85% of the frequency

Media and Analysts:  Call for Graphics

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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