Words of the Pandemic

 

This Global Language Monitor Explainer will be expanded continuously as information on the new strains of Swine Flu (related to Type A H1N1) become available.

According to the CDC:  “Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus — Human infections with a new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus continue to be reported in China. The virus has been detected in poultry in China as well. While mild illness in human cases has been seen, most patients have had severe respiratory illness and some people have died.

No cases of H7N9 outside of China have been reported. The new H7N9 virus has not been detected in people or birds in the United States.”

Media Alert:  If you need a customized version of this explainer, please call +1.512.815.8836.

Below are the technical definitions of the phases and the Planned US Federal Government response.

A Glossary of other Pandemic-related terms follows.

 

 

 

Glossary

Term                                            Definition

  1. 20th Century Pandemics
  2. 1917 Pandemic — La Gripe Espanola or the “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.
  3. 1957 Pandemic — The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.
  4. 1968 Pandemic — The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about  1 million deaths.
  5. 1976 faux Pandemic — First identified at Ft. Dix, NJ in a new recruit, the pandemic never unfolded.  The massive US immunization program resulted in about 500 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurological condition that can be fatal.  About fifty deaths were reported.
  6. CDC — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.
  7. Close Contact – One meter (about three feet) is often cited by infection control professionals to define close contact (based on studies of respiratory infections); for practical purposes, this distance may range up to 2 meters (six feet).  The World Health Organization says approximately one meter; the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidlelines state within 6 feet”.
  8. Epidemic — A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal.
  9. Facemask — A disposable mask cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a medical device.   Facemasks have several designs.  Held in place two ties, conforms to the face with the aid of a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge, and may be flat/pleated or duck-billed in shape; pre-molded, attached a single elastic band, and has a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge; and flat/pleated and attached  with ear loops. Facemasks cleared by the FDA for use as medical devices have been determined to have specific levels of protection from penetration of blood and body fluids.
  10. Ground Zero — The location where the first case occurred.  The earliest confirmed case of the influenz A H1N1 has been traced to the village of La Gloria in Veracruz, Mexico located south east of Mexico City.
  11. H1N1 — See Influenza A H1N1.
  12. Influenza — A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.
  13. (Electron Microscope image of Influenza A H1N1 virus.)
  14. Influenza A (H1N1) — The official name of what is commonly but inaccurately called ‘swine flu”.  The strain consists of four elements, one human, one avian, and two swine.  The World Health Organization began using this nomenclature on April 30, 2009.
  15. Influenza Pandemic — A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.
  16. Mutating Virus — In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.
  17. Pandemic — The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal.
  18. Pandemic Phases — WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure above.)
  19. Pandemic Phase 1 — Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.
  20. Pandemic Phase 2 — Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.
  21. Pandemic Phase 3 — No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.
  22. Pandemic Phase 4 — Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.
  23. Pandemic Phase 5 — Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.
  24. Pandemic Phase 6  —  Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase  is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.  [Editor’s Note:  According to these stated criteria, the pandemic phase has already reached pandemic phase 6 on April 30, 2009.]
  25. Respirator — Refers to an N95 or higher filtering facepiece respirator certified by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  26. rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel diagnostic  test – A tool used to diagnose swine flu cases locally, thus speeding up the confirmation process.
  27. Spanish Flu   —   Another name for the 1918 flu pandemic or La Gripe Espanola.
  28. Swine Flu   —   Commonly used shorthand name for influenza A (H1N1) Symptoms — Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue, and sometimes diarrhea and vomiting.
  29. Tamiflu and Relenza  —  In response to the request from CDC, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration , in has issued Emergency Use Authorizations  for the use of Relenza and Tamiflu antiviral products.   Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US. For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessens the symptoms but is not a cure for Swine Flu.
  30. WHO — Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.

Pandemic Explainer

Words of the Pandemic (originally published in May 2009, updated May 2013)

This explainer will be expanded continuously as information on the new version of Swine Flu (originally Type A H1N1) becomes available.  

According to the CDC:  “Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus — Human infections with a new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus continue to be reported in China. The virus has been detected in poultry in China as well. While mild illness in human cases has been seen, most patients have had severe respiratory illness and some people have died.

No cases of H7N9 outside of China have been reported. The new H7N9 virus has not been detected in people or birds in the United States.”

Media Alert:  If you need a customized version of this explainer, please call +1.512.815.8836.

These are the technical definitions of the phases and the Planned US Federal Government response.

Term                                            Definition

20th Century Pandemics

1917 Pandemic — La Gripe Espanola or the “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.

1957 Pandemic — The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.

1968 Pandemic — The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about  1 million deaths.

1976 faux Pandemic — First identified at Ft. Dix, NJ in a new recruit, the pandemic never unfolded.  The massive US immunization program resulted in about 500 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurological condition that can be fatal.  About fifty deaths were reported.

CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Close Contact – One meter (about three feet) is often cited by infection control professionals to define close contact (based on studies of respiratory infections); for practical purposes, this distance may range up to 2 meters (six feet).  The World Health Organization says approximately one meter; the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidlelines state within 6 feet”. 

Epidemic — A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal.

Facemask — A disposable mask cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a medical device.   Facemasks have several designs.  Held in place two ties, conforms to the face with the aid of a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge, and may be flat/pleated or duck-billed in shape; pre-molded, attached a single elastic band, and has a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge; and flat/pleated and attached  with ear loops. Facemasks cleared by the FDA for use as medical devices have been determined to have specific levels of protection from penetration of blood and body fluids.

Ground Zero — The location where the first case occurred.  The earliest confirmed case of the influenz A H1N1 has been traced to the village of La Gloria in Veracruz, Mexico located south east of Mexico City.

H1N1 — See Influenza A H1N1.

Influenza — A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.

 (Electron Microscope image of Influenza A H1N1 virus.)

Influenza A (H1N1) — The official name of what is commonly but inaccurately called ‘swine flu”.  The strain consists of four elements, one human, one avian, and two swine.  The World Health Organization began using this nomenclature on April 30, 2009.

Influenza Pandemic — A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.

Mutating Virus — In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.

Pandemic — The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Pandemic Phases — WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure above.)

Pandemic Phase 1 — Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.

Pandemic Phase 2 — Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.

Pandemic Phase 3 — No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 4 — Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 5 — Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.

Pandemic Phase 6   Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase  is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.  [Editor’s Note:  According to these stated criteria, the pandemic phase has already reached pandemic phase 6 on April 30, 2009.]

Respirator — Refers to an N95 or higher filtering facepiece respirator certified by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 

rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel diagnostic  test – A tool used to diagnose swine flu cases locally, thus speeding up the confirmation process.

Spanish Flu     Another name for the 1918 flu pandemic or La Gripe Espanola.

Swine Flu      Commonly used shorthand name for influenza A (H1N1) Symptoms — Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue, and sometimes diarrhea and vomiting.        

Tamiflu and Relenza    In response to the request from CDC, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration , in has issued Emergency Use Authorizations  for the use of Relenza and Tamiflu antiviral products.   Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US.  For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessens the symptoms but is not a cure for Swine Flu.

WHO — Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.



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Words of the Pandemic that You Need to Know

4/27 Media Alert:  Updated with 20th Pandemics and Expanded Pandemic Phases.

For Immediate Release

1.512.8158836 Phone

pjjp@post.harvard.edu email

Words of the Pandemic that You Need to Know

Glossary Updated Daily

Austin, TX. April 27, 2009.  (Updated) The ‘Words of the Pandemic’ glossary has been released by the Global Language Monitor. 

The “Words of the Pandemic” explainer will be continuously updated.  To see the latest updates, go to the Pandemic Explainer.

“As with other global and significant events, GLM has assembled ‘The Words of the Pandemic’ explainer, a glossary of the essential terms the educated layperson needs to know to better understand the significance of the potential Swine Flu pandemic as it unfolds.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

Below is the current list of defined terms.

Term                                            Definition

 

20th Century Pandemics

1917 Pandemic — The “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.

1957 Pandemic — The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.

1968 Pandemic — The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about 1 million deaths.

CDC — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Epidemic — A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Ground Zero — The location where the first case occurred.

H1N1 — The current strain of H1N1 consists of genes already found in existing variations of swine, avian and human flu viruses.

Influenza — A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.

Influenza Pandemic — A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.

Mutating Virus — In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.

Pandemic — The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Pandemic Phases — WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure.)

Pandemic Phase 1 — Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.

Pandemic Phase 2 — Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.

Pandemic Phase 3 — No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 4 — Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 5 — Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.

Pandemic Phase 6 — Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase, is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.

Spanish Flu — Another name for the 1918 pandemic

Swine Flu —  Officially named swine influenza A (H1N1)

Symptoms — Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue. Sometimes diarhea and vomiting.         

Tamiflu — Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US.  For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessons the symptons but is not a cure for Swine Flu.

WHO — Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.

 

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, visit www.LanguageMonitor.com, or call +1.925.367.7557.

 

   
   

 


About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, visit www.LanguageMonitor.com, or call +1.512.815.8836

 



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College Rankings (Momentum) — April 2009

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

.

.

For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum
Rank Overall
1 Bard College, NY 10
2 Colorado College, CO 1
3 Harvey Mudd College, CA 45
4 Wesleyan University, CT 37
5 St Olaf College, MN 40
6 Grinnell College, IA 29
7 Holy Cross, MA 38
8 Gettysburg College, PA 39
9 Claremont McKenna, CA 43
10 St Lawrence, NY 47
11 Drew University, NJ 33
12 Occidental College, CA 28
13 Davidson College, NC 25
14 Southwestern U., TX 48
15 Skidmore College, NY 41
16 U. of Richmond, VA 7
17 Middlebury College, VT 6
18 Furman University, SC 42
19 Trinity College, CT 22
20 Macalester College, MN 54
21 Reed College, OR 34
22 Amherst College, MA 3
23 Connecticut College, CT 26
24 Whitman College, WA 44
25 Wellesley College, MA 4
26 Colgate University, NY 17
27 DePauw University, IN 35
28 Centre College, KY 46
29 Lafayette College, PA 19
30 Colby College, ME 27
31 Pomona College, CA 28
32 Scripps College, CA 50
33 Barnard College, NY 18
34 Kenyon College, OH 31
35 Swarthmore College, PA 13
36 Bucknell University, PA 12
37 Haverford College, PA 30
38 Bates College, ME 32
39 Hamilton College, NY 15
40 Dickinson College, PA 23
54 Mount Holyoke, MA 20
41 Union College, NY 8
42 Washington & Lee, PA 36
43 Smith College, MA 14
44 Williams College, MA 2
45 Oberlin College, OH 5
46 Bryn Mawr College, PA 16
47 Vassar College, NY 9
48 Franklin & Marshall, PA 49
49 Carleton College, MN 24
50 Bowdoin College, ME 11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



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University Rankings – April 2009

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

Harvard Nips Columbia, Chicago, Michigan, Stanford follow,

Wisconsin, Cornell, Princeton, Yale, and Berkeley in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 9, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about what GLM’s College Reputation Management Services can do for your school

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.   Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.


Universities — Spring  2009 Rank 1

Harvard University, MA

2

Columbia University, NY

3

University of Chicago, IL

4 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, MI 5

Stanford University, CA

6 University of Wisconsin—Madison , WI 7

Cornell University, NY

8

Princeton University, NJ

9

Yale University, CT

10 University of California—Berkeley, CA 11 University of Pennsylvania, PA 12 University of Washington, WA 13 University of California—Los Angeles, CA 14

Johns Hopkins University, MD

15

Duke University, NC

16 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 17 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill, NC 18

New York University

19

U. of California-San Diego

20

U. of California-Davis

21

Boston University, MA

22 Ohio State University—Columbus, OH 23

California Institute of Technology CA

24

Northwestern University, IL

25

University of Texas-Austin, TX

26

University of Florida.FL

27

Boston College, MA

28

University of Virginia, VA

29

Purdue University, IN

30 University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign, IL 31

University of Southern California, CA

32

U. of California-Santa Barbara, CA

33

Georgia Institute of Technology, GA

34

University of Georgia, GA

35

Georgetown University, DC

36

Rutgers University, NJ

37

Pennsylvania State University, PA

38

Syracuse University, NY

39

Vanderbilt University, TN

40

Emory University, GA

41

Texas A&M University, TX

42

Carnegie Mellon University, PA

43

U. of California, Irvine, CA

44

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

45

Case Western Reserve, OH

46

Tufts University, MA

47

University of Notre Dame, IN

48

Dartmouth College, NH

49 Villanova University, PA 50 College of William and Mary, VA

.

.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.  To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



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University Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top Colleges Rankings, click here.

Media Momentum

CalTech nips Emory, Boston College, Georgia Tech and Tufts follow

Southern Cal, Rice, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Brandeis in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 7, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Momentum

University

Overall

1.

CalTech

22

2.

Emory University, GA

39

3.

Boston College, MA

26

4.

GeorgiaTech

32

5.

Tufts University, MA

45

6.

U. of Southern California

30

7.

Rice University, TX

48

8.

Georgetown University, DC

34

9.

Vanderbilt University, TN

38

10.

Brandeis University, MA

54

11.

Wake Forest, NC

52

12.

Syracuse University, NY

37

13.

Northwestern, IL

23

14.

Dartmouth College, NH

47

15.

Notre Dame, IN

46

16.

Tulane University, LA

51

17.

Auburn University, AL

50

18.

Case Western Reserve, OH

44

19,

Rensselaer (RPI), NY

57

20.

U. of Texas—Austin

24

21.

California—Santa Barbara

31

22.

Baylor University, TX

55

23.

Carnegie Mellon, PA

41

24.

Washington U., MO

42

25.

Texas A&M University

40

26.

University of Georgia

33

27.

Lehigh University , PA

58

28.

Boston University, MA

20

29.

Villanova University, PA

60

30.

William and Mary, VA

59

31.

Princeton University, NJ

8

32.

University of MN

60

33.

Purdue University, IN

28

34.

U. of California, Irvine

60

35.

U. of  Wisconsin—Madison

6

36.

New York University

18

37.

MIT

16

38.

University of Virginia

27

39,

PennState

36

40.

University of Florida

25

41.

Columbia University, NY

2

42.

University of Washington

12

43.

Ohio State University

13

44.

U. of  California—Irvine

43

45.

U. of Pennsylvania

11

46.

Stanford University, CA

5

47.

Rutgers University, NJ

35

48.

Yale University, CT

9

49.

U. of California—Davis

60

50.

U. of North Carolina

17

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.



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College Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum

Rank

Overall

1

Bard College, NY

10

2

Colorado College, CO

1

3

Harvey Mudd College, CA

45

4

Wesleyan University, CT

37

5

St Olaf College, MN

40

6

Grinnell College, IA

29

7

Holy Cross, MA

38

8

Gettysburg College, PA

39

9

Claremont McKenna, CA

43

10

St Lawrence, NY

47

11

Drew University, NJ

33

12

Occidental College, CA

28

13

Davidson College, NC

25

14

Southwestern U., TX

48

15

Skidmore College, NY

41

16

U. of Richmond, VA

7

17

Middlebury College, VT

6

18

Furman University, SC

42

19

Trinity College, CT

22

20

Macalester College, MN

54

21

Reed College, OR

34

22

Amherst College, MA

3

23

Connecticut College, CT

26

24

Whitman College, WA

44

25

Wellesley College, MA

4

26

Colgate University, NY

17

27

DePauw University, IN

35

28

Centre College, KY

46

29

Lafayette College, PA

19

30

Colby College, ME

27

31

Pomona College, CA

28

32

Scripps College, CA

50

33

Barnard College, NY

18

34

Kenyon College, OH

31

35

Swarthmore College, PA

13

36

Bucknell University, PA

12

37

Haverford College, PA

30

38

Bates College, ME

32

39

Hamilton College, NY

15

40

Dickinson College, PA

23

54

Mount Holyoke, MA

20

41

Union College, NY

8

42

Washington & Lee, PA

36

43

Smith College, MA

14

44

Williams College, MA

2

45

Oberlin College, OH

5

46

Bryn Mawr College, PA

16

47

Vassar College, NY

9

48

Franklin & Marshall, PA

49

49

Carleton College, MN

24

50

Bowdoin College, ME

11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.



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TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings April 2009

      For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.       For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.       For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.


Liberal Arts Colleges

Colorado nips Williams, followed by Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, and Oberlin

Middlebury, Richmond, Union, Vassar and Bard in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008. Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days. The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm. To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Rank

1

Colorado College, CO

2

Williams College, MA

3

Amherst College, MA

4

Wellesley College, MA

5

Oberlin College, OH

6

Middlebury College, VT

7

University of Richmond, VA

8

Union College, NY

9

Vassar College, NY

10

Bard College, NY

11

Bowdoin College, ME

12

Bucknell University, PA

13

Swarthmore College, PA

14

Smith College, MA

15

Hamilton College, NY

16

Bryn Mawr College, PA

17

Colgate University, NY

18

Barnard College, NY

19

Lafayette College, PA

20

Mount Holyoke College, MA

21

Pomona College, CA

22

Trinity College, CT

23

Dickinson College, PA

24

Carleton College, MN

25

Davidson College, NC

26

Connecticut College, CT

27

Colby College, ME

28

Occidental College, CA

29

Grinnell College, IA

30

Haverford College, PA

31

Kenyon College, OH

32

Bates College, ME

33

Drew University, NJ

34

Reed College, WA

35

DePauw University, IN

36

Washington & Lee University, PA

37

Wesleyan University, CT

38

College of the Holy Cross, MA

39

Gettysburg College, PA

40

St Olaf College, MN

54

Macalester College, MN

41

Skidmore College, NY

42

Furman University, SC

43

Claremont McKenna College, CA

44

Whitman College, WA

45

Harvey Mudd College, CA

46

Centre College, KY

47

St Lawrence University, NY

48

Southwestern University, TX

49

Franklin and Marshall College, PA

50

Scripps College, NY

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

Previous benchmark was in aftermath of 9/11 attacks

.

Austin, TX March 24, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that the word ‘outrage’ has been used more in the global media this week than anytime this century. The previous benchmark was in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The analysis of the global printed and electronic media was concluded earlier today. 

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact.  The amount of anger and outrage as reflected in the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

In particular, the word has been quoted in association with the uproar over the AIG bonuses, as having been used by President Obama, his senior staff, members of congress, commentators, and ordinary citizens at large.  The GLM analysis included global print and electronic media since the turn of the 21st century. 

GLM examined word usage in the seven days following significant events including, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, the start of the Iraq War in 2003, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in September 2005.  The analysis included global print and electronic media. 

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media: 

1. AIX Bonuses, 2009

2. the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

Earlier GLM had reported that words of despair and fear have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s election as president of the United States on November 4, 2008, with examples abound, including  catastrophe,  depression, as in full-blown or impending disaster, collapse, and crisis, among many others.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

Editorial, March 4 2009

One million. These days, with billions in bailouts and trillions in debts, a million of anything doesn’t seem like all that much.

But a million English words? Hat and cat and poll and prestidigitation?

Sure, the dictionary’s full of words. But a regular Webster’s has only about 200,000 words in it. And the gold standard of English dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary, which comes in volumes, contains only about 600,000. And the average American’s vocabulary? 20,000 words. Ouch

Obviously, the Global Language Monitor knows more than the Oxford folks. That’s the organization contending English will add its one millionth word sometime next month

The group can’t, of course, foretell what that word will be. Maybe it’ll be a kid word, like “janky,” also sometimes spelled “jainky” or “jinky.” (These things are always fluid.) It apparently means anything from “substandard” to “weird” and often relates to other people. “That guy is sure janky!”

Superlatives are often expressed in new-slang: “Wooka,” for instance, is said to be the hottest way to say “Wow!” And “nang” means “absolutely fantastic!”

The Urban Dictionary, an online and hard-bound resource for slang- sensitive people, tries to keep current as the vernacular evolves. This is not easy; it offers a new word each day. “Gank,” it says, means “to steal.” “I didn’t have any money, so I ganked it.”

“Yinz” is the new way to say “y’all,” “you guys” or “you.”

“Janhvi” is a really amazing person who knows how to be a great friend

English has absorbed a variety of computer geekisms: “lol,” meaning “laugh out loud,” and, a kid-related warning, “prw,” meaning, “parents are watching.” And, by the way, “geek” itself is so far “out” of the argot that it has turned up in the dictionary. And it has a possible origin: It might be an alteration of the Low German “gek.” That’s pretty establishment

Of course, most of the words mentioned here have undoubtedly vanished from the patois, never to pass young lips again. As soon as adults become aware of a new slang word, you can bet it’s no longer “in,” “hot,” “with it.”

It’s sooooo lame, as nobody would say anymore.

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