Is Websters its Own Worst Frenemy?

60% of new words in 2009 Collegiate Dictionary update were born before today’s college students

‘New’ words average age — 29 years

Austin, TX July 16, 2009, (MetaNewswire) – Is Merriam-Webster its own worst frenemy? The answer to that question can perhaps be answered by the upcoming release of its Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition with the addition of almost 100 new words and word meanings (or senses).

The ‘new’ words (with their dates of first usage) include:

New Word or Term First Usage

Carbon footprint 1999

Flash mob 1977

Green-collar 1990

Locavore 2005

Memory foam 1987

Missalette 1977

Reggaeton 2002

Sock puppet 1959

Waterboarding 2004

Webisode 1997

These are ‘new’ words only insofar as they were never included in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate, but on average, the words were coined more than 29 years ago (according to M-W’s own definitions). This compares with the average age of today’s college students in the mid-twenties (even with the recent shift to older students).

On the web, ‘waterboarding’ has some 2,000,000 references, ‘webisode’ about 5,000,000 and ‘sock puppet‘ some half million (according to Google). Last year ‘dark energy’ was added to the Collegiate Dictionary some ten years after it had become the subject of much scientific, philiosophical and popular debate. (It had about 10,000,000 references at the time.)

“This is perhaps why students are evermore turning to online resources to understand current affairs and class materials.The reality of today’s Internet-based communications means that new English-language words are appearing and being adopted at an ever-quickening pace,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “It is entirely possible some of these students heard or even used some of these words while they were still in grammar school”.

To celebrate the coming of age of English as the first, true, global language, The Global Language Monitor announced the 1,000,000th word to enter the English language on June 10, 2009. GLM estimates that a new word appears every 98 minutes, generated by the 1.5 billion people who now use English as a first, second or business language.



Is Merriam-Webster its own worst frenemy?

60% of new words in 2009 Collegiate were born before today’s college students

‘New’ words average age — 29 years

Austin, TX July 16, 2009, (MetaNewswire) – Is Merriam-Webster its own worst frenemy? The answer to that question can perhaps be answered by the upcoming release of its Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition with the addition of almost 100 new words and word meanings (or senses).  The average of these “new words” is twenty-nine years, according to Merriam-Webster’s itself.

The ‘new’ words (with their dates of first usage) include:

New Word or Term and First Usage

  • Carbon footprint 1999
  • Flash mob 1977
  • Green-collar 1990
  • Locavore 2005
  • Memory foam 1987
  • Missalette 1977
  • Reggaeton 2002
  • Sock puppet 1959
  • Waterboarding 2004
  • Webisode 1997

These are ‘new’ words only insofar as they were never included in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate, but on average, the words were coined more than 29 years ago (according to M-W’s own definitions). This compares with the average age of today’s college students in the mid-twenties (even with the recent shift to older students).

On the web, ‘waterboarding’ has some 2,000,000 references, ‘webisode’ about 5,000,000 and ‘sock puppet‘ some half million (according to Google). Last year ‘dark energy’ was added to the Collegiate Dictionary some ten years after it had become the subject of much scientific, philiosophical and popular debate. (It had about 10,000,000 references at the time.)

“This is perhaps why students are evermore turning to online resources to understand current affairs and class materials.The reality of today’s Internet-based communications means that new English-language words are appearing and being adopted at an ever-quickening pace,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “It is entirely possible some of these students heard or even used some of these words while they were still in grammar school”.

To celebrate the coming of age of English as the first, true, global language, The Global Language Monitor announced the 1,000,000th word to enter the English language on June 10, 2009. GLM estimates that a new word appears every 98 minutes, generated by the 1.5 billion people who now use English as a first, second or business language.

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Michael Jackson funeral tops John Paul II as No. 1 media funeral

No. 1 Michael Jackson; No. 2 Pope John Paul II; No. 3 Ronald Reagan; No. 4 Mother Teresa, No. 5 Princess Diana

Measured Global Print and Electronic Media from Day of Death to Day after Funeral since 1997

Austin, TX July 8, 2009– In an exclusive analysis performed by the Global Language Monitor, the death of Michael Jackson, the entertainment icon, has been found to be the Top Funeral in the Global Print and Electronic Media over the last dozen years . Jackson moved ahead of Pope John Paul II, whose funeral in 2005 previously set the standard.

The results follow:

  1. Michael Jackson, June 25 – July 8, 2009
  2. Pope John Paul II, April 2 – April 9, 2005
  3. Ronald Reagan, June 5 – June 10, 2004
  4. Mother Teresa, September 5 – September 14, 1997
  5. Princess Diana, August 31 – September 7, 1997

The death, aftermath, and funeral of Michael Jackson had some 18% more stories in the global print and electronic media than that of Pope John Paul II in 2005. The analysis covered the Top 5,000 print and electronic media sites, but excluded blogs and social media since they did not have a significant presence throughout the entire period of measurement.

“The death of Michael Jackson, and the media frenzy surrounding of its aftermath and his funeral, has moved Michael Jackson to the forefront of coverage of similar prominent deaths over the last dozen years,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM.  Other prominent passings include those of Pope John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, Princess Diana and Mother Teresa. “The strength (and depth) of the global media coverage only adds to his already significant legacy and shows no sign of abetting.”

When measured in terms total web presence, Jackson outdistances Ronald Reagan, at No. 2, by more a factor of 10.

The results follow:

  1. Michael Jackson, died in 2009
  2. Ronald Reagan, died in 2004
  3. Pope John Paul II, died in 2005
  4. Princess Diana, died in 1997
  5. Mother Teresa, died in 1997



One Millionth Word Announced

Web 2.0 beats Jai Ho & N00b as 1,000,000th English Word

English passed the Million Word mark earlier today, June 10 at 10:22 am GMT

Word Number 1,000,001: Financial Tsunami

Austin, Texas June 10, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced that Web 2.0 has bested Jai Ho, N00b and Slumdog as the 1,000,000th English word or phrase. added to the codex of fourteen hundred-year-old language. Web 2.0 is a technical term meaning the next generation of World Wide Web products and services. It has crossed from technical jargon into far wider circulation in the last six months. Two terms from India, Jai Ho! and slumdog finished No. 2 and 4. Jai Ho! Is a Hindi exclamation signifying victory or accomplishment; Slumdog is an impolite term for children living in the slums. Just missing the top spot was n00b, a mixture of letters and numbers that is a derisive term for newcomer. It is also the only mainstream English word that contains within itself two numerals. Just missing the final five cut-off,  was another technical term, cloud computing, meaning services that are delivered via the cloud. At its current rate, English generates about 14.7 words a day or one every 98 minutes.

‘Millionth English word’ declared

A US web monitoring firm has declared the millionth English word to be Web 2.0, a term for the latest generation of web products and services.

Matt Frei reports on English’s unique linguistic evolution and then spoke to Global Language Monitor’s Paul Payack who helped find this millionth English word.

SEE ALSO

BBC NEWS | Programmes | World News America | ‘Millionth English word’ declared

“As expected, English crossed the 1,000,000 word threshold on June 10, 2009 at 10:22 am GMT. However, some 400 years after the death of the Bard, the words and phrases were coined far from Stratford-Upon-Avon, emerging instead from Silicon Valley, India, China, and Poland, as well as Australia, Canada, the US and the UK,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “English has become a universal means of communication; never before have so many people been able to communicate so easily with so many others.”
The English language is now being studies by hundreds of millions around the globe for entertainment, commercial or scientific purposes. In 1960 there were some 250 million English speakers, mostly in former colonies and the Commonwealth countries. The future of English as a major language was very much in doubt. Today, some 1.53 billion people now speak English as a primary, auxiliary, or business language, with some 250 million acquiring the language in China alone.

These are the fifteen finalists for the one millionth English word, all of which have met the criteria of a minimum of 25,000 citations with the necessary breadth of geographic distribution, and depth of citations.
1,000,000: Web 2.0 – The next generation of web products and services, coming soon to a browser near you.
999,999: Jai Ho! – The Hindi phrase signifying the joy of victory, used as an exclamation, sometimes rendered as “It is accomplished”. Achieved English-language popularity through the multiple Academy Award Winning film, “Slumdog Millionaire”.
999,998: N00b — From the Gamer Community, a neophyte in playing a particular game; used as a disparaging term.
999,997: Slumdog – a formerly disparaging, now often endearing, comment upon those residing in the slums of India.
999,996: Cloud Computing – The ‘cloud’ has been technical jargon for the Internet for many years. It is now passing into more general usage.
999,995: Carbon Neutral — One of the many phrases relating to the effort to stem Climate Change.
999,994: Slow Food — Food other than the fast-food variety hopefully produced locally (locavores).
999,993: Octomom – The media phenomenon relating to the travails of the mother of the octuplets.
999,992: Greenwashing – Re-branding an old, often inferior, product as environmentally friendly.
999,991: Sexting – Sending email (or text messages) with sexual content.
999,990: Shovel Ready – Projects are ready to begin immediately upon the release of federal stimulus funds.
999,989: Defriend – Social networking terminology for cutting the connection with a formal friend.
999,988: Chengguan – Urban management officers, a cross between mayors, sheriff, and city managers.
999,987: Recessionista – Fashion conscious who use the global economic restructuring to their financial benefit.
999,986: Zombie Banks – Banks that would be dead if not for government intervention and cash infusion.
———————————————————————————————————
In addition, the 1,000,001st word is Financial Tsunami – The global financial restructuring that seemingly swept out of nowhere, wiping out trillions of dollars of assets, in a matter of months
Each word was analyzed to determine which depth (number of citations) and breadth (geographic extent of word usage), as well as number of appearances in the global print and electronic media, the Internet, the blogosphere, and social media (such as Twitter and YouTube). The Word with the highest PQI score was deemed the 1,000,000th English language word. The Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) is used to track and analyze word usage.
Global Language Monitor has been tracking English word creation since 2003. Once it identifies new words (or neologisms) it measures their extent and depth of usage with its PQI technology.



Millionth Word Finalists Announced

English Language Millionth Word Finalists Announced, including:  alcopops, bangster, de-friend, n00b, quendy-trendy, slumdog, and wonderstar

English to Pass Millionth Word June 10 at 10:22 am GMT

Million Word March Now Stands at 999,824

Austin, Texas May 29, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced the finalists for the Million Word March.  The English Language will cross the 1,000,000 word threshold on June 10, 2009 at 10:22 am Stratford-Upon-Avon time.

“The Million Word milestone brings to notice the coming of age of English as the first, truly global Language”, said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “There are three major trends involving the English language today: 1) An explosion in word creation; English words are being added to the language at the rate of some 14.7 words a day; 2) a geographic explosion where some 1.53 billion people now speak English around the globe as a primary, auxiliary, or business language; and 3) English has become, in fact, the first truly global language.”

Due to the global extent of the English language, the Millionth Word is as likely to appear from India, China, or East L.A.as it is to emerge from Stratford-upon-Avon (Shakespeare’s home town). The final words and phrases under consideration are listed below.  These words represent each of the categories of Global English that GLM tracks, Since English appears to be adding a new word every 98 minutes or about 14.7 words a day, the Global Language Monitor is selecting a representative sampling.  You can follow the English Language WordClock counting down to the one millionth word at www.LanguageMonitor.com.

These words that are on the brink of entering the language as the finalists for the One Millionth English Word:

Australia:  Alchopops – Sugary-flavored mixed drinks very much en vogue.

Chinglish:  Chengguan –   Urban management officers, a cross between mayors, sheriff, and city managers.

Economics:  1) Financial Tsunami – The global financial restructuring that seemingly swept out of nowhere, wiping out trillions of dollars of assets, in a matter of months.  2) Zombie Banks – Banks that would be dead if not for government intervention and cash infusion.

Entertainment:  Jai Ho! — From the Hindi, “it is accomplished’ achieved English-language popularity through the multiple Academy Award Winner, “Slumdog Millionaire”.

Fashion: 1) Chiconomics – The ability to maintain one’s fashion sense (chicness) amidst the current financial crisis.  2) Recessionista – Fashion conscious who use the Global economic restructuring to their financial benefit; 3) Mobama – relating to the fashion-sense of the US First Lady, as in ‘that is quite mobamaish’.

Popular Culture:  Octomom (the media phenomenon of the mother of the octuplets).

Green Living:  1) Green washing – Re-branding an old product as environmentally friendly. 2) E-vampire – Appliances and machines on standby-mode, which continually use electrical energy they ‘sleep’. 3) Slow food: — Food other than the fast-food variety hopefully produced locally (locavores).

Hinglish:   Cuddies – Ladies’ underwear or panties.

Internet:  1) De-follow – No longer following the updates of someone on a social networking site.  2) De-friend – No longer following the updates of a friend on a social networking site; much harsher than de-following. 3) Web 2.0 – The next generation of web services.

Language: Toki Pona – The only language (constructed or natural) with a trademark.

Million Word March:   MillionWordWord — Default entry if no other word qualifies.

Music:  Wonderstar – as in Susan Boyle, an overnight sensation, exceeding all realsonable expectations.

Poland:  Bangsters – A description of those responsible for ‘predatory’ lending practices, from a combination of the words banker and gangster.

Politically incorrect:  1) Slumdog – a formerly disparaging comments upon those residing in the slums of India; 2) Seatmates of size – US airline euphemism for passengers who carry enough weight to require two seats.

Politics:  1) Carbon neutral — One of the many phrases relating to the effort to stem Climate Change.  2) Overseas Contingency Operations – The Obama re-branding of the Bush War on Terror.

Sports:  Phelpsian – The singular accomplishments of Michael Phelps at the Beijing Olympics.

Spirituality:  Renewalist – Movements that encompass renewal of the spirit; also call ‘Spirit-filled’ movements.

Technology:  1) Cloud Computing – The ‘cloud’ has been technical jargon for the Internet for many years.  It is now passing into more general usage. 2) N00b — From the Gamer Community; a neophyte in playing a particular game; used as a disparaging term.  3) Sexting – Sending email (or text messages) with sexual content.

YouthSpeak:  Quendy-Trendy — British youth speak for hip or up-to-date.

Extra Credit:

French word with least chance of entering English Language:  le courriel – E-Mail.

Most recognized English-language word on the planet:  O.K.

Each word is being analyzed to determine which is attaining the greatest depth (number of citations) and breadth (geographic extent of word usage), as well as number appearances in the global print and electronic media, the Internet, the blogosphere, and social media (such as Twitter and YouTube).  The Word with the highest PQI score will be deemed the 1,000,000th English language word.  The Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) is used to track and analyze word usage.

Global Language Monitor has been tracking English word creation since 2003.  Once it identifies new words (or neologisms) it measures their extent and depth of usage with its PQI technology.

In Shakespeare’s day, there were only 2,000,000 speakers of English and fewer than 100,000 words.  Shakespeare himself coined about 1,700 words.  Thomas Jefferson invented about 200 words, and George W. Bush created a handful, the most prominent of which is, misunderestimate.  US President Barack Obama’s surname passed into wordhood last year with the rise of obamamania.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, email info@ GlobalLanguageMonitor.com, visit www.LanguageMonitor.com, or call +1.925.367.7557.

A Million Words and Counting

If you are interested in learning more about the Million Word March, you can read about it in “A Million Words and Counting” by Paul JJ Payack.  This book from Kensington’s Citadel imprint takes you on a whirlwind tour of the English language and it dramatic impact on the various aspects of culture, including politics, the economy, entertainment, commerce and technology.  Now available as a quality paperback.

 

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Seemingly chaotic events reflect normalcy of new reality

 

An Historical Inflection Point:

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The US Presidential Election and the Fianancial Tsunami

 

Austin, Texas, USA.   October 13, 2008. The worldwide financial tsunami that has captured the attention of the worldwide media (as well as governments, corporations and ordinary citizens), has come to dominate one of the great quadrennial media events of the post-Modern era.  No, we are not referring to the Olympics, most recently held in Beijing, or even football’s World Cup but, rather, the US Presidential elections.

The immediate effect of this unprecedented upheaval of global markets is the obfuscation of the clear lines of division offered by the opposing parties in the US Presidential Elections.

There is the sense that we are witnessing an unprecedented historical event; historical in the sense that we now appear to be standing astride (or atop) a cusp in history, a delta, a decision point, what is now called a point of inflection or inflection point.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us. 

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the Tsunami washing over the planet at a steady speed and ever-quicker pace.  Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t change at all.  It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality:  News now emanates at the speed of thought, from tens of thousands or, even, millions of sources.

The nature of a Tsunami is little understood other than the tremendous damage it unleashes when it washes ashore.  What we do know, however, is that a tsunami travels in exceedingly long waves (tens of kilometers in length) racing through the oceanic depths at hundreds of kilometers per hour.  Only upon reaching the shore is its true destructive power unleashed for all to see (if they survive to witness it at all). 

In the same manner, the traditional media become transfixed with the roiling surface seas but fail to acknowledge the more sustained and significant, movements occurring just beneath the surface.

The surface swirls about in fascinating eddies, but the true transformation is occurring as the nearly undetectable waves rush through the open sea only occasionally, though dramatically, making their way onto shore. 

In the same manner, the traditional media focuses on the Twenty-four-hour News Cycle but seem to miss the strong and prevalent currents immediately beneath the surface.  They vainly attempt to tie global, transformative, and unprecedented events to relatively parochial events and forces (the Reagan Years, the Clinton administration, Bush 41 and 43, the de-regulation initiatives of Alan Greenspan of  ‘99) that are being all but over-shadowed (and –whelmed) by unyielding and all-but irresistible forces.

There is an almost palpable sense and correct sense that things are 1) changing forever, 2) out of our control (or even influence), and 3) will have a direct impact upon the planet for generations to follow.

What we can control, and make sense of, however, is a candidate’s wink, smirk or disdainful reference.  We can emphatically pin down our opponents into convenient sound bites, hopefully contradicting earlier sound bites.  Do you personally take responsibility for Climate Change?  (Does the fact that New York City was beneath 5,000 feet of Ice a few dozen centuries ago influence your vote today? A yes or no will suffice!)  Is your personal philosophy, whatever it might be, grounded in a belief system that I can systematically debunk and demean.  (Yes or no.)  Are you for or against atom smashers creating miniscule black holes that may or may not swallow up the Earth?   (Answer yes and you are a barbarian; answer no and you have absolutely no respects of the future prospects of the human race.)  Did you ever consider yourself a loser (at any point in your life)?  Did you ever make the acquaintance of fellow losers? 

Nevertheless, the US Presidential Election will proceed to its own conclusion on the first Tuesday of November in the year two thousand and eight.

For the preceding five years, The Global Language Monitor has attempted to clarify the course (and future course) of human events as documented in the English language.

The tools at our disposal have sometimes allowed us to peer into events and trends that become, otherwise, obscured, by the ‘noise’ of the Twenty-four Hour News Cycle.

Our goal was, and continues to be, to extricate (and explicate upon) the true currents underpinning the events we call news, and to better understand what they mean and how they are perceived with the new media reality in mind.

For example, back in the days preceding the 2004 Presidential election cycle, GLM discovered the fact that once ideas, words and phrases were launched into the vast, uncharted, oceanic Internet, they do not, indeed, die out after twenty-four hours but, rather, travel in deep, powerful currents and waves (not unlike those of a tsunami) that only grow stronger as they make their ways to distant shores.

In this new reality, tsunami-like ideas pass through vast seas of information of the Internet, nearly undetected and often unmeasured, until they crash upon our shorelines, where their full power (and possibly fury) is unleashed.

The fact that we only entertain them for 24 hours before they are dispatched into the archives of what is considered ‘past’ or ‘passed’ and readily discarded, is beyond the point.

We often hear that ‘we’ve never seen anything like this’ before.  Of course not.  Think back a few hundred years to other information revolutions, such as that introduced along with mechanical type.  What do you think the fortunate few thought when they first laid their eyes upon the works of Aristotle, the Bible, or the Arabic translations of Euclid?  No one had ever seen anything like that before!  Indeed.

And astonishment will only become more so as the future unfolds.

 

– Paul JJ Payack, President & Chief Word Analyst, The Global Language Monitor



 

Words of the Pandemic

 

This Global Language Monitor Explainer will be expanded continuously as information on the new strains of Swine Flu (related to Type A H1N1) become available.

According to the CDC:  ”Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus – Human infections with a new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus continue to be reported in China. The virus has been detected in poultry in China as well. While mild illness in human cases has been seen, most patients have had severe respiratory illness and some people have died.

No cases of H7N9 outside of China have been reported. The new H7N9 virus has not been detected in people or birds in the United States.”

Media Alert:  If you need a customized version of this explainer, please call +1.512.815.8836.

Below are the technical definitions of the phases and the Planned US Federal Government response.

A Glossary of other Pandemic-related terms follows.

 

 

 

Glossary

Term                                            Definition

  1. 20th Century Pandemics
  2. 1917 Pandemic — La Gripe Espanola or the “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.
  3. 1957 Pandemic – The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.
  4. 1968 Pandemic – The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about  1 million deaths.
  5. 1976 faux Pandemic — First identified at Ft. Dix, NJ in a new recruit, the pandemic never unfolded.  The massive US immunization program resulted in about 500 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurological condition that can be fatal.  About fifty deaths were reported.
  6. CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.
  7. Close Contact – One meter (about three feet) is often cited by infection control professionals to define close contact (based on studies of respiratory infections); for practical purposes, this distance may range up to 2 meters (six feet).  The World Health Organization says approximately one meter; the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidlelines state within 6 feet”.
  8. Epidemic – A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal.
  9. Facemask — A disposable mask cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a medical device.   Facemasks have several designs.  Held in place two ties, conforms to the face with the aid of a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge, and may be flat/pleated or duck-billed in shape; pre-molded, attached a single elastic band, and has a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge; and flat/pleated and attached  with ear loops. Facemasks cleared by the FDA for use as medical devices have been determined to have specific levels of protection from penetration of blood and body fluids.
  10. Ground Zero – The location where the first case occurred.  The earliest confirmed case of the influenz A H1N1 has been traced to the village of La Gloria in Veracruz, Mexico located south east of Mexico City.
  11. H1N1 — See Influenza A H1N1.
  12. Influenza – A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.
  13. (Electron Microscope image of Influenza A H1N1 virus.)
  14. Influenza A (H1N1) — The official name of what is commonly but inaccurately called ‘swine flu”.  The strain consists of four elements, one human, one avian, and two swine.  The World Health Organization began using this nomenclature on April 30, 2009.
  15. Influenza Pandemic – A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.
  16. Mutating Virus – In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.
  17. Pandemic – The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal.
  18. Pandemic Phases – WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure above.)
  19. Pandemic Phase 1 – Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.
  20. Pandemic Phase 2 – Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.
  21. Pandemic Phase 3 – No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.
  22. Pandemic Phase 4 – Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.
  23. Pandemic Phase 5 — Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.
  24. Pandemic Phase 6  –  Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase  is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.  [Editor's Note:  According to these stated criteria, the pandemic phase has already reached pandemic phase 6 on April 30, 2009.]
  25. Respirator — Refers to an N95 or higher filtering facepiece respirator certified by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  26. rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel diagnostic  test – A tool used to diagnose swine flu cases locally, thus speeding up the confirmation process.
  27. Spanish Flu   –   Another name for the 1918 flu pandemic or La Gripe Espanola.
  28. Swine Flu   –   Commonly used shorthand name for influenza A (H1N1) Symptoms — Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue, and sometimes diarrhea and vomiting.
  29. Tamiflu and Relenza  –  In response to the request from CDC, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration , in has issued Emergency Use Authorizations  for the use of Relenza and Tamiflu antiviral products.   Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US. For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessens the symptoms but is not a cure for Swine Flu.
  30. WHO — Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.

Pandemic Explainer

Words of the Pandemic (originally published in May 2009, updated May 2013)

This explainer will be expanded continuously as information on the new version of Swine Flu (originally Type A H1N1) becomes available.  

According to the CDC:  ”Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus – Human infections with a new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus continue to be reported in China. The virus has been detected in poultry in China as well. While mild illness in human cases has been seen, most patients have had severe respiratory illness and some people have died.

No cases of H7N9 outside of China have been reported. The new H7N9 virus has not been detected in people or birds in the United States.”

Media Alert:  If you need a customized version of this explainer, please call +1.512.815.8836.

These are the technical definitions of the phases and the Planned US Federal Government response.

Term                                            Definition

20th Century Pandemics

1917 Pandemic — La Gripe Espanola or the “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.

1957 Pandemic – The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.

1968 Pandemic – The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about  1 million deaths.

1976 faux Pandemic — First identified at Ft. Dix, NJ in a new recruit, the pandemic never unfolded.  The massive US immunization program resulted in about 500 cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, a neurological condition that can be fatal.  About fifty deaths were reported.

CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Close Contact – One meter (about three feet) is often cited by infection control professionals to define close contact (based on studies of respiratory infections); for practical purposes, this distance may range up to 2 meters (six feet).  The World Health Organization says approximately one meter; the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidlelines state within 6 feet”. 

Epidemic – A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal.

Facemask — A disposable mask cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as a medical device.   Facemasks have several designs.  Held in place two ties, conforms to the face with the aid of a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge, and may be flat/pleated or duck-billed in shape; pre-molded, attached a single elastic band, and has a flexible adjustment for the nose bridge; and flat/pleated and attached  with ear loops. Facemasks cleared by the FDA for use as medical devices have been determined to have specific levels of protection from penetration of blood and body fluids.

Ground Zero – The location where the first case occurred.  The earliest confirmed case of the influenz A H1N1 has been traced to the village of La Gloria in Veracruz, Mexico located south east of Mexico City.

H1N1 — See Influenza A H1N1.

Influenza – A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.

 (Electron Microscope image of Influenza A H1N1 virus.)

Influenza A (H1N1) — The official name of what is commonly but inaccurately called ‘swine flu”.  The strain consists of four elements, one human, one avian, and two swine.  The World Health Organization began using this nomenclature on April 30, 2009.

Influenza Pandemic – A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.

Mutating Virus – In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.

Pandemic – The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Pandemic Phases – WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure above.)

Pandemic Phase 1 – Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.

Pandemic Phase 2 – Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.

Pandemic Phase 3 – No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 4 – Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 5 — Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.

Pandemic Phase 6   Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase  is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.  [Editor's Note:  According to these stated criteria, the pandemic phase has already reached pandemic phase 6 on April 30, 2009.]

Respirator — Refers to an N95 or higher filtering facepiece respirator certified by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 

rRT-PCR Swine Flu Panel diagnostic  test – A tool used to diagnose swine flu cases locally, thus speeding up the confirmation process.

Spanish Flu     Another name for the 1918 flu pandemic or La Gripe Espanola.

Swine Flu      Commonly used shorthand name for influenza A (H1N1) Symptoms — Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue, and sometimes diarrhea and vomiting.        

Tamiflu and Relenza    In response to the request from CDC, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration , in has issued Emergency Use Authorizations  for the use of Relenza and Tamiflu antiviral products.   Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US.  For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessens the symptoms but is not a cure for Swine Flu.

WHO — Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.



Words of the Pandemic that You Need to Know

4/27 Media Alert:  Updated with 20th Pandemics and Expanded Pandemic Phases.

For Immediate Release

1.925.367.7557 Phone

pjjp@post.harvard.edu email

Words of the Pandemic that You Need to Know

Glossary Updated Daily

Austin, TX. April 27, 2009.  (Updated) The ‘Words of the Pandemic’ glossary has been released by the Global Language Monitor. 

The “Words of the Pandemic” explainer will be continuously updated.  To see the latest updates, go to the Pandemic Explainer.

“As with other global and significant events, GLM has assembled ‘The Words of the Pandemic’ explainer, a glossary of the essential terms the educated layperson needs to know to better understand the significance of the potential Swine Flu pandemic as it unfolds.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

Below is the current list of defined terms.

Term                                            Definition

 

20th Century Pandemics

1917 Pandemic – The “Spanish Flu”.   50 million or more died in the 1918 pandemic, up to 200,000 in the US.  Some 30% of the world’s population of 1.5 billion were infected.

1957 Pandemic – The “Asian Flu”  originated in China.  It had two major waves killing some 2 million people.

1968 Pandemic – The “Hong Kong Flu” spread globally for two years resulting in about 1 million deaths.

CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the CDC is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

Epidemic – A disease occurring suddenly in humans in a community, region or country in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Ground Zero – The location where the first case occurred.

H1N1 – The current strain of H1N1 consists of genes already found in existing variations of swine, avian and human flu viruses.

Influenza – A serious disease caused by viruses that infects the upper respiratory tract.

Influenza Pandemic – A global outbreak of a new influenza ‘A’ virus that is easily transmitted from person-to-person worldwide.

Mutating Virus – In general, any flu virus mutates and evolves mechanisms that enable it to escape the immune defence systems of its victims.

Pandemic – The global outbreak of a disease in humans in numbers clearly in excess of normal. 

Pandemic Phases – WHO has divided pandemics into six phases.  (See Figure.)

Pandemic Phase 1 – Low risk of human cases.  No viruses circulating among animals have been reported to cause infections in humans.

Pandemic Phase 2 – Higher risk of human cases.  An animal influenza virus circulating among domesticated or wild animals is known to have caused infection in humans, and is therefore considered a potential pandemic threat.

Pandemic Phase 3 – No or very limited human-to-human transmission.  An animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus has caused sporadic cases or small clusters of disease in people, but has not resulted in human-to-human transmission sufficient to sustain community-level outbreaks. Limited human-to-human transmission may occur under some circumstances, for example, when there is close contact between an infected person and an unprotected caregiver. However, limited transmission under such restricted circumstances does not indicate that the virus has gained the level of transmissibility among humans necessary to cause a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 4 – Evidence of increased human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human transmission of an animal or human-animal influenza reassortant virus able to cause “community-level outbreaks.” The ability to cause sustained disease outbreaks in a community marks a significant upwards shift in the risk for a pandemic. Any country that suspects or has verified such an event should urgently consult with WHO so that the situation can be jointly assessed and a decision made by the affected country if implementation of a rapid pandemic containment operation is warranted. Phase 4 indicates a significant increase in risk of a pandemic.

Pandemic Phase 5 – Evidence of significant human-to-human transmission.  Human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in one WHO region (Figure 4). While most countries will not be affected at this stage, the declaration of Phase 5 is a strong signal that a pandemic is imminent and that the time to finalize the organization, communication, and implementation of the planned mitigation measures is short.

Pandemic Phase 6 – Efficient and sustained human-to-human transmission. The pandemic phase, is characterized by community level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different WHO region in addition to the criteria defined in Phase 5. Designation of this phase will indicate that a global pandemic is under way.

Spanish Flu – Another name for the 1918 pandemic

Swine Flu –  Officially named swine influenza A (H1N1)

Symptoms – Body aches, fever, headaches, sore throat, body pain, chills and fatigue. Sometimes diarhea and vomiting.         

Tamiflu – Tamiflu has been stockpiled by Homeland Security in the US.  For optimum efficacy, infected individuals should take it as early as possible.  It lessons the symptons but is not a cure for Swine Flu.

WHO – Located in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization, is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system.

 

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, visit www.LanguageMonitor.com, or call +1.925.367.7557.

 

   
   

 


About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, visit www.LanguageMonitor.com, or call +1.925.367.7557.

 



College Rankings (Momentum) — April 2009

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

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For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum
Rank Overall
1 Bard College, NY 10
2 Colorado College, CO 1
3 Harvey Mudd College, CA 45
4 Wesleyan University, CT 37
5 St Olaf College, MN 40
6 Grinnell College, IA 29
7 Holy Cross, MA 38
8 Gettysburg College, PA 39
9 Claremont McKenna, CA 43
10 St Lawrence, NY 47
11 Drew University, NJ 33
12 Occidental College, CA 28
13 Davidson College, NC 25
14 Southwestern U., TX 48
15 Skidmore College, NY 41
16 U. of Richmond, VA 7
17 Middlebury College, VT 6
18 Furman University, SC 42
19 Trinity College, CT 22
20 Macalester College, MN 54
21 Reed College, OR 34
22 Amherst College, MA 3
23 Connecticut College, CT 26
24 Whitman College, WA 44
25 Wellesley College, MA 4
26 Colgate University, NY 17
27 DePauw University, IN 35
28 Centre College, KY 46
29 Lafayette College, PA 19
30 Colby College, ME 27
31 Pomona College, CA 28
32 Scripps College, CA 50
33 Barnard College, NY 18
34 Kenyon College, OH 31
35 Swarthmore College, PA 13
36 Bucknell University, PA 12
37 Haverford College, PA 30
38 Bates College, ME 32
39 Hamilton College, NY 15
40 Dickinson College, PA 23
54 Mount Holyoke, MA 20
41 Union College, NY 8
42 Washington & Lee, PA 36
43 Smith College, MA 14
44 Williams College, MA 2
45 Oberlin College, OH 5
46 Bryn Mawr College, PA 16
47 Vassar College, NY 9
48 Franklin & Marshall, PA 49
49 Carleton College, MN 24
50 Bowdoin College, ME 11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



University Rankings – April 2009

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

Harvard Nips Columbia, Chicago, Michigan, Stanford follow,

Wisconsin, Cornell, Princeton, Yale, and Berkeley in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 9, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about what GLM’s College Reputation Management Services can do for your school

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.   Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.


Universities — Spring  2009 Rank 1

Harvard University, MA

2

Columbia University, NY

3

University of Chicago, IL

4 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, MI 5

Stanford University, CA

6 University of Wisconsin—Madison , WI 7

Cornell University, NY

8

Princeton University, NJ

9

Yale University, CT

10 University of California—Berkeley, CA 11 University of Pennsylvania, PA 12 University of Washington, WA 13 University of California—Los Angeles, CA 14

Johns Hopkins University, MD

15

Duke University, NC

16 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 17 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill, NC 18

New York University

19

U. of California-San Diego

20

U. of California-Davis

21

Boston University, MA

22 Ohio State University—Columbus, OH 23

California Institute of Technology CA

24

Northwestern University, IL

25

University of Texas-Austin, TX

26

University of Florida.FL

27

Boston College, MA

28

University of Virginia, VA

29

Purdue University, IN

30 University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign, IL 31

University of Southern California, CA

32

U. of California-Santa Barbara, CA

33

Georgia Institute of Technology, GA

34

University of Georgia, GA

35

Georgetown University, DC

36

Rutgers University, NJ

37

Pennsylvania State University, PA

38

Syracuse University, NY

39

Vanderbilt University, TN

40

Emory University, GA

41

Texas A&M University, TX

42

Carnegie Mellon University, PA

43

U. of California, Irvine, CA

44

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

45

Case Western Reserve, OH

46

Tufts University, MA

47

University of Notre Dame, IN

48

Dartmouth College, NH

49 Villanova University, PA 50 College of William and Mary, VA

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The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.  To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



University Rankings (Momentum) – April 2009

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top Colleges Rankings, click here.

Media Momentum

CalTech nips Emory, Boston College, Georgia Tech and Tufts follow

Southern Cal, Rice, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Brandeis in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 7, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Momentum

University

Overall

1.

CalTech

22

2.

Emory University, GA

39

3.

Boston College, MA

26

4.

GeorgiaTech

32

5.

Tufts University, MA

45

6.

U. of Southern California

30

7.

Rice University, TX

48

8.

Georgetown University, DC

34

9.

Vanderbilt University, TN

38

10.

Brandeis University, MA

54

11.

Wake Forest, NC

52

12.

Syracuse University, NY

37

13.

Northwestern, IL

23

14.

Dartmouth College, NH

47

15.

Notre Dame, IN

46

16.

Tulane University, LA

51

17.

Auburn University, AL

50

18.

Case Western Reserve, OH

44

19,

Rensselaer (RPI), NY

57

20.

U. of Texas—Austin

24

21.

California—Santa Barbara

31

22.

Baylor University, TX

55

23.

Carnegie Mellon, PA

41

24.

Washington U., MO

42

25.

Texas A&M University

40

26.

University of Georgia

33

27.

Lehigh University , PA

58

28.

Boston University, MA

20

29.

Villanova University, PA

60

30.

William and Mary, VA

59

31.

Princeton University, NJ

8

32.

University of MN

60

33.

Purdue University, IN

28

34.

U. of California, Irvine

60

35.

U. of  Wisconsin—Madison

6

36.

New York University

18

37.

MIT

16

38.

University of Virginia

27

39,

PennState

36

40.

University of Florida

25

41.

Columbia University, NY

2

42.

University of Washington

12

43.

Ohio State University

13

44.

U. of  California—Irvine

43

45.

U. of Pennsylvania

11

46.

Stanford University, CA

5

47.

Rutgers University, NJ

35

48.

Yale University, CT

9

49.

U. of California—Davis

60

50.

U. of North Carolina

17

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



College Rankings (Momentum) — April 2009

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum

Rank

Overall

1

Bard College, NY

10

2

Colorado College, CO

1

3

Harvey Mudd College, CA

45

4

Wesleyan University, CT

37

5

St Olaf College, MN

40

6

Grinnell College, IA

29

7

Holy Cross, MA

38

8

Gettysburg College, PA

39

9

Claremont McKenna, CA

43

10

St Lawrence, NY

47

11

Drew University, NJ

33

12

Occidental College, CA

28

13

Davidson College, NC

25

14

Southwestern U., TX

48

15

Skidmore College, NY

41

16

U. of Richmond, VA

7

17

Middlebury College, VT

6

18

Furman University, SC

42

19

Trinity College, CT

22

20

Macalester College, MN

54

21

Reed College, OR

34

22

Amherst College, MA

3

23

Connecticut College, CT

26

24

Whitman College, WA

44

25

Wellesley College, MA

4

26

Colgate University, NY

17

27

DePauw University, IN

35

28

Centre College, KY

46

29

Lafayette College, PA

19

30

Colby College, ME

27

31

Pomona College, CA

28

32

Scripps College, CA

50

33

Barnard College, NY

18

34

Kenyon College, OH

31

35

Swarthmore College, PA

13

36

Bucknell University, PA

12

37

Haverford College, PA

30

38

Bates College, ME

32

39

Hamilton College, NY

15

40

Dickinson College, PA

23

54

Mount Holyoke, MA

20

41

Union College, NY

8

42

Washington & Lee, PA

36

43

Smith College, MA

14

44

Williams College, MA

2

45

Oberlin College, OH

5

46

Bryn Mawr College, PA

16

47

Vassar College, NY

9

48

Franklin & Marshall, PA

49

49

Carleton College, MN

24

50

Bowdoin College, ME

11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



College Rankings – April 2009

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Colorado nips Williams, followed by Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, and Oberlin

Middlebury, Richmond, Union, Vassar and Bard in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Rank

1

Colorado College, CO

2

Williams College, MA

3

Amherst College, MA

4

Wellesley College, MA

5

Oberlin College, OH

6

Middlebury College, VT

7

University of Richmond, VA

8

Union College, NY

9

Vassar College, NY

10

Bard College, NY

11

Bowdoin College, ME

12

Bucknell University, PA

13

Swarthmore College, PA

14

Smith College, MA

15

Hamilton College, NY

16

Bryn Mawr College, PA

17

Colgate University, NY

18

Barnard College, NY

19

Lafayette College, PA

20

Mount Holyoke College, MA

21

Pomona College, CA

22

Trinity College, CT

23

Dickinson College, PA

24

Carleton College, MN

25

Davidson College, NC

26

Connecticut College, CT

27

Colby College, ME

28

Occidental College, CA

29

Grinnell College, IA

30

Haverford College, PA

31

Kenyon College, OH

32

Bates College, ME

33

Drew University, NJ

34

Reed College, WA

35

DePauw University, IN

36

Washington & Lee University, PA

37

Wesleyan University, CT

38

College of the Holy Cross, MA

39

Gettysburg College, PA

40

St Olaf College, MN

54

Macalester College, MN

41

Skidmore College, NY

42

Furman University, SC

43

Claremont McKenna College, CA

44

Whitman College, WA

45

Harvey Mudd College, CA

46

Centre College, KY

47

St Lawrence University, NY

48

Southwestern University, TX

49

Franklin and Marshall College, PA

50

Scripps College, NY

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



‘Outrage’ in global media

‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

Previous benchmark was in aftermath of 9/11 attacks

.

Austin, TX March 24, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that the word ‘outrage’ has been used more in the global media this week than anytime this century. The previous benchmark was in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The analysis of the global printed and electronic media was concluded earlier today. 

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact.  The amount of anger and outrage as reflected in the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

In particular, the word has been quoted in association with the uproar over the AIG bonuses, as having been used by President Obama, his senior staff, members of congress, commentators, and ordinary citizens at large.  The GLM analysis included global print and electronic media since the turn of the 21st century. 

GLM examined word usage in the seven days following significant events including, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, the start of the Iraq War in 2003, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in September 2005.  The analysis included global print and electronic media. 

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media: 

1. AIX Bonuses, 2009

2. the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

Earlier GLM had reported that words of despair and fear have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s election as president of the United States on November 4, 2008, with examples abound, including  catastrophe,  depression, as in full-blown or impending disaster, collapse, and crisis, among many others.



ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES ; The word factory keeps producing

Editorial, March 4 2009

One million. These days, with billions in bailouts and trillions in debts, a million of anything doesn’t seem like all that much.

But a million English words? Hat and cat and poll and prestidigitation?

Sure, the dictionary’s full of words. But a regular Webster’s has only about 200,000 words in it. And the gold standard of English dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary, which comes in volumes, contains only about 600,000. And the average American’s vocabulary? 20,000 words. Ouch

Obviously, the Global Language Monitor knows more than the Oxford folks. That’s the organization contending English will add its one millionth word sometime next month

The group can’t, of course, foretell what that word will be. Maybe it’ll be a kid word, like “janky,” also sometimes spelled “jainky” or “jinky.” (These things are always fluid.) It apparently means anything from “substandard” to “weird” and often relates to other people. “That guy is sure janky!”

Superlatives are often expressed in new-slang: “Wooka,” for instance, is said to be the hottest way to say “Wow!” And “nang” means “absolutely fantastic!”

The Urban Dictionary, an online and hard-bound resource for slang- sensitive people, tries to keep current as the vernacular evolves. This is not easy; it offers a new word each day. “Gank,” it says, means “to steal.” “I didn’t have any money, so I ganked it.”

“Yinz” is the new way to say “y’all,” “you guys” or “you.”

“Janhvi” is a really amazing person who knows how to be a great friend

English has absorbed a variety of computer geekisms: “lol,” meaning “laugh out loud,” and, a kid-related warning, “prw,” meaning, “parents are watching.” And, by the way, “geek” itself is so far “out” of the argot that it has turned up in the dictionary. And it has a possible origin: It might be an alteration of the Low German “gek.” That’s pretty establishment

Of course, most of the words mentioned here have undoubtedly vanished from the patois, never to pass young lips again. As soon as adults become aware of a new slang word, you can bet it’s no longer “in,” “hot,” “with it.”

It’s sooooo lame, as nobody would say anymore.



The Hills Medical Group Becomes Austin’s First Christian Medical Clinic

The Hills Medical Group (THMG) Becomes Austin’s First Christian Medical Clinic  

Now Associated with Deep River Ministries

 

Austin, TEXAS, March 6, 2014 – The Hills Medical Group is Austin’s first Christ Medical Healing Center through its new association with the Deep River Ministries (DRM) of San Antonio. DRM is a Christian interdenominational church founded by Rev. Dr. Jack Sheffield. Specifically, because of its association with DRM’s Christ Healing Center, The Hills Medical Group (THMG) is now able to bring God deeper into the healing process to help combat the spiritual component of any illness.

“The Hills Medical Group has long been associated with innovative and breakthrough healing techniques, including alternative, naturopathic, and holistic health treatments as well as complementary conventional treatments,” said Dr. Ted Edwards, known as the Father of Wellness in Texas. “With this new association with the Christ Healing Center we now have another point of distinction: the first Medical Healing Center appointed by Deep River Ministries.

This makes The Hills Medical Group not only a leading holistic health & alternative treatments clinic, but also a medical group where prayer becomes an even more active, integral part of the healing process.

THMG uses patients’ own biochemical information to develop a course of treatment that will allow the body to heal itself. The goal is to limit chronic use of prescription drugs and to use nutrients and natural detoxifiers to promote natural healing.

As alternative treatment and modalities become increasingly widespread, THMG works to treat the whole patient –body, mind and spirit. Since stress on the mind, causes stress on the body, HMG’s treatments are designed to identify and address those areas of weakness.

In addition to their professional specialties, all three associated in the practice are ordained Christian ministers.

Hills Medical Group Staff:

Ted L. Edwards, Jr., M.D., has been treating patients in Austin since 1964. He is an internist with extensive training in Internal Medicine, Anti-aging Modalities and Gastroenterology. He has served the medical profession and Austin community over the years as Chairman of the Texas Medical Association Section on Digestive Disease, Team Physician and Chairman of Sports Medicine for the U.S. Cycling Federation, Chief of Staff at Holy Cross Hospital and Chairman of the Texas Governor’s Commission on Physical Fitness.

His pioneering concept of “Wellness” led to the honorary title of “The Father of Wellness in Texas” during his tenure as Chairman of the Texas Governor’s Commission on Physical Fitness. In addition to serving the community, he is an acclaimed author and radio talk show host. Dr. Edwards has written two books, Power Aging and Weight Loss to Super Wellness. He has educated the public through his radio show and has been a featured speaker on the topics of Alternative Medicine, Gastroenterology and Wellness.

Dr. Edwards is ordained and believes deeply that the power of prayer, gratitude and forgiveness is essential to healing. Prayer is offered and encouraged as part of the healing process.

Terri M. Beim, N.D. is a certified Naturopathic and Holistic Healthcare Practitioner and has been in practice since 2001. The goal of her consultation is to help the whole person in identifying their particular health challenge and then re-establishing the body’s balance by removing the obstacles to health & encouraging the body’s natural healing process. She is first and foremost an educator, spending an extensive amount of time with each client on their particular body chemistry, toxic loads, diet, lifestyle, and the subsequent health challenges faced by that person.

Specialties include food sensitivities/allergies, gluten sensitivity, and candida overgrowth. She is able to offer the most effective protocols available for dealing with these issues as well as providing the required education to the patient in order to insure a successful outcome. Additionally, she is able to assist with natural hormone balancing, optimizing immune function, nutritional deficiencies, detoxification, and various other therapies aimed at helping the human body return to the natural state of homeostasis.

She is ordained and believes in the power of prayer and offers prayer as well as spiritual guidance as part of the healing process.

I. Harrison Moore, M.D. is a board certified Family Practice Physician, eligible with the Board of Clinical Metal Toxicology and a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and DAN certified for autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Moore has provided care for over 30 years to adults and children. In years of practicing, he has treated entire families from birth to end of life in the fields of obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, geriatrics, internal and hospital medicine.

Dr. Moore’s care is patient centered, meaning that he focuses on the person, not the diagnosis or disease. Many patients come in with vague, unusual and often chronic symptoms that their doctors have not been able to figure out. They are often worn out and discouraged from just trying to get someone in the medical establishment to listen to them. Dr. Moore often hears that “all my labs are normal’ but they don’t feel “normal.” He listens to his patients and values their input. He feels it’s important to establish a good rapport and a trusting relationship with a patient.

Specialties include thyroid disorders, natural hormone balancing, persistent fatigue, anti-aging, insomnia, GI issues, toxic metals, high blood pressure, cardiovascular health, osteoporosis, autism, ADD/ADHD, low immunity, chronic illness, and optimum well child visits.

Additionally, he is ordained and offers prayer as part of the healing process upon request.

About the Hills Medical Group

The Hills Medical Group is Austin’s premier naturopathic holistic health & alternative treatments clinic and also a house of healing prayer, where prayer becomes an active, integral part of the healing process.

The Hills Medical Group | Center for Health and Healing,
4201 Bee Caves Road, Suite B112, West Lake Hills, Texas 78746
Website: http://www.centerforhealthandhealing.org
Phone: 512-327-4886. Email: info@poweraging.com

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Enhances College Reputation

TrendTopper enhances college reputation by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year, go here.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

For More Information about our reputation management services, please call 1.512.815.8836, or send email to pauljjpayack@gmail.com.

Top HollyWords of 2008

<img src=”http://tbn3.google.com/images?q=tbn:_HaTE6bSZjWugM:http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/11/06/magazine/11safire600.1.jpg” alt=”" />
<h3>‘Jai Ho!’ and ‘Slumdog’ top HollyWORDs of 2008</h3>
<h3>followed by ‘Hmong,’ ‘Nuke the Fridge’ and ‘Twinkie defense’</h3>
<h3></h3>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>6th Annual Survey by the Global Language Monitor</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span> </span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>Austin, TX. February 26, 2009.<span>  </span>‘Jai Ho!’ and ‘Slumdog’ from Slumdog Millionaire top the 2008 list of words from Hollywood that most influenced the English Language in 2008.<span>  </span>Closely following were ‘Hmong’ fromGran Torino, ‘Nuke the Fridge’ from Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull and ‘Twinkie defense’ (which followed the events depicted in Milk).<span>  </span><span> </span>It was the first time that two words from the same movie were ranked in the Top Ten.<span>  </span>Rounding out the Top Ten were:<span>  </span>‘Djembe’ (The Visitor), “There are no coincidences” (Kung Fu Panda), ‘What doesn’t kill you makes you … stranger,” (The Dark Knight), Posthumous (The Wrestler), and Katrina from Benjamin Button.</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>“2008 was a remarkable year for words in films, with a Hindi phrase, the name of a Laotian tribe, a West African drum, and a modified quotation from Frederick Nietzsche all making the list,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.<span> </span></span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>The Top Hollywords of the 2008 with commentary follow.</span></p>

<ol type=”1″>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Jai Ho! (Slumdog Millionaire) – Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi.</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Slumdog (Slumdog Millionaire) – Definitely a politically incorrect term for young slum-dwellers in Bombay (Mumbai).</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Nuke the Fridge (Indiana Jones and the ) – Indiana Jones surviving a nuclear blast in a lead-lined fridge is viewed as proof that the franchise has run its course (similar to Fonzi’s Jump the Shark episode on Happy Days).</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Hmong (Gran Torino) – The name of the mountain-dwelling peoples of Laos who were US Allies in the Indochinese Wars of the 1960-70s.<span>  </span>Pronounced with a silent ‘h’:<span>  </span>mong.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Twinkie Defense (Milk) – The apocryphal outcome of the trial 1979 trial of Dan White, the former San Francisco Supervisor who killed both Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.<span>  </span>The term was never actually used in the trial but was picked up in the media as a stand-in for ‘diminished capacity’.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Djembe (The Visitor) – West African percussion instrument that Tarek teaches Walter.</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>There are no coincidences (Kung Fu Panda) – Oogway’s solemn pronouncement to Master Shifu</span></span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>What doesn’t kill you makes you … stranger (The Dark Knight) – The Joker’s twist on the famous Nietzsche epigram.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span>Posthumous (The Wrestler) – Yes, that really was Mickey Rourke as a Best Actor nominee, well after he had been pronounced dead many a time.</span></li>
<li class=”MsoNormal”><span><span>Katrina (Benjamin Button) – The ominous and pervasive threat of Katrina framing the movie demonstrates the depth to which the hurricane has penetrated the American subconscious.</span></span></li>
</ol>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span> </span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>Previous Top HollyWord Winners:</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2007<span>     </span>“Call it, Friendo,” from “No Country for Old Men”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2006<span>     </span>“High Five!!! Its sexy time!’ from “Borat!”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2005<span>     </span>‘Brokeback’ from “Brokeback Mountain”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2004<span>     </span>“Pinot” from “Sideways”</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>2003<span>     </span>‘’Wardrobe malfunction” from Super Bowl XXXVIII</span></p>
<p class=”MsoNormal”><span>The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases.<span>  </span>The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.<span>  </span></span></p>

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TrendTopper enhances college reputation news

TrendTopper enhances college reputation

.

by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

 

 

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education.  Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas.  TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media.  TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.  

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues.  These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

       We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?

       How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?

       We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?

       We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?

       We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?

       Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here? 

 

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year.  The next Internet Rankings will be announced in April, 2009

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest. 

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, call 1.925.367.7557, email info@GlobalLanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.




 

Global Economic Restructuring


Name current crisis, ‘Global Economic Restructuring’

To more precisely describe current economic condition

To remove emotional freight from the debate

Austin, TX February 17, 2009 – Earlier this month we noted that words of despair and fear of the Global Economic Meltdown have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s Election as President of the United States on November 4, 2008.The period of the analysis covered 90 days, ending February 3, 2009.

Since that time, the language describing the current financial situation from the administration, the congress and the pundits as reflected in the Global Media has become even more severe.Even a cursory review of the contemporary media bears this out.The favored descriptions include:

  • Catastrophe,
  • Depression, as in full-blown or impending
  • Disaster,
  • Collapse, asin Total
  • Meltdown,
  • Tsunami, as in Financial Tsunami,
  • Crisis,
  • Unprecedented, and
  • Panic, among others.

When describing the entire cycle — from years of deregulation to the housing bubble to the banking bailout and credit squeeze — the emerging consensus seems to be ‘financial meltdown’.Earlier, ‘financial tsunami,’ was favored by some because it aptly described the suddenness, the violence, and the unexpected nature of the potential ‘collapse’ of the global financial system.

However, thus far no description satisfies the two criteria that are called for here: 1) to adequately describe the enormity of the situation, and (2) to do so in an objective, non-emotional manner.

History, of course, will have the ultimate say in the matter.And History usually settles on the dispassionate.All the contemporary names for the conflict between the American North and the South in 1861-1865 yielded simply to the Civil War over time, Just as The Great War yielded to World War I, and subsequently, World War II.

GLM was founded, in part, to identify political buzzwords as ordinary words that become ‘loaded’ or fraught with emotional content far beyond the normal definition of the word.

In this case we also feel it incumbent to note that calling our current economic plight a Depression, certainly might be true – if after 12 years our unemployment rate hovers around 25%, some 10,000 banks have collapsed, and the Dow Jones suffers a 90% decline as was the case in the Great depression.

Also, there was a real question if Western Capitalism would survive at all.At that time Communism (and not garden-variety Socialism) and Fascism were considered to be in competition with free enterprise Capitalism, and the outcome was by no means settled.(Such was the nature of the ‘fear’ to which President Roosevelt referred.) This is certainly, not the case today, where the global consensus overwhelmingly favors free enterprise, in its various shapes and forms, to be the key to long-lasting global prosperity.

Therefore, GLM is suggesting that the current crisis be labeled, simply, the Global Economic Restructuring, thereby more precisely describing the current global economic condition and, at the same time, to removing some of the emotional freight from the debate.

– Paul JJ Payack, Editor

‘Despair’ & ‘fear’ drowning out ‘Hope’ in Global Media

Comparison of 90-days since election to 9/11 and Start of Iraq War

Austin, TX February 10, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown are drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008.

With thousands of global headlines centering on the deteriorating global economy followed by news of the human toll of people driven to despair and committing acts of desperation, GLM undertook an analysis of the language used in the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election.GLM then compared their frequency of use to the ninety days following the 9/11 Terrorists attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and the 90-day period following the outbreak of the Iraq War in 2003.The representative fear-related words chosen:Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate/Desperation.

The analysis found that these words were used in the last ninety days with 18-23% more frequency since the historic Obama election than when compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.The one exception was that of the word fear, itself, though its use in relation to the economic meltdown was still some 85% of its use in the case of 9/11 and the Iraq War.

“The results are striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Omama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in,” ” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

The specific breakdown of the keywords (and related variations) follows:

1.Abandoned — Abandoned appeared some 23% more frequently

2.Despair — Despair appeared some 18% more frequently

3.Desperation – Desperation appeared some 18% more frequently

4.Fear – Fear appeared some 85% of the frequency

 
Media and Analysts:  Call for Graphics

The US Presidential Election and the Financial Tsunami

Seemingly chaotic events reflect normalcy of new reality

A Historical Inflection Point

Austin, Texas, USA.October 13, 2008. The worldwide financial tsunami that has captured the attention of the worldwide media (as well as governments, corporations and ordinary citizens), has come to dominate one of the great quadrennial media events of the post-Modern era.No, we are not referring to the Olympics, most recently held in Beijing, or even football’s World Cup but, rather, the US Presidential elections.

The immediate effect of this unprecedented upheaval of global markets is the obfuscation of the clear lines of division offered by the opposing parties in the US Presidential Elections.

There is the sense that we are witnessing an unprecedented historical event; historical in the sense that we now appear to be standing astride (or atop) a cusp in history, a delta, a decision point, what is now called a point of inflection or inflection point.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us.

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the Tsunami washing over the planet at a steady speed and ever-quicker pace.Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t change at all.It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality:News now emanates at the speed of thought, from tens of thousands or, even, millions of sources.

The nature of a Tsunami is little understood other than the tremendous damage it unleashes when it washes ashore.What we do know, however, is that a tsunami travels in exceedingly long waves (tens of kilometers in length) racing through the oceanic depths at hundreds of kilometers per hour.Only upon reaching the shore is its true destructive power unleashed for all to see (if they survive to witness it at all).

In the same manner, the traditional media become transfixed with the roiling surface seas but fail to acknowledge the more sustained and significant, movements occurring just beneath the surface.

The surface swirls about in fascinating eddies, but the true transformation is occurring as the nearly undetectable waves rush through the open sea only occasionally, though dramatically, making their way onto shore.

In the same manner, the traditional media focuses on the Twenty-four-hour News Cycle but seem to miss the strong and prevalent currents immediately beneath the surface.They vainly attempt to tie global, transformative, and unprecedented events to relatively parochial events and forces (the Reagan Years, the Clinton administration, Bush 41 and 43, the de-regulation initiatives of Alan Greenspan of ‘99) that are being all but over-shadowed (and –whelmed) by unyielding and all-but irresistible forces.

There is an almost palpable sense and correct sense that things are 1) changing forever, 2) out of our control (or even influence), and 3) will have a direct impact upon the planet for generations to follow.

What we can control, and make sense of, however, is a candidate’s wink, smirk or disdainful reference.We can emphatically pin down our opponents into convenient sound bites, hopefully contradicting earlier sound bites.Do you personally take responsibility for Climate Change?(Does the fact that New York City was beneath 5,000 feet of Ice a few dozen centuries ago influence your vote today? A yes or no will suffice!)Is your personal philosophy, whatever it might be, grounded in a belief system that I can systematically debunk and demean.(Yes or no.)Are you for or against atom smashers creating miniscule black holes that may or may not swallow up the Earth?(Answer yes and you are a barbarian; answer no and you have absolutely no respects of the future prospects of the human race.)Did you ever consider yourself a loser (at any point in your life)?Did you ever make the acquaintance of fellow losers?

Nevertheless, the US Presidential Election will proceed to its own conclusion on the first Tuesday of November in the year two thousand and eight.

For the preceding five years, The Global Language Monitor has attempted to clarify the course (and future course) of human events as documented in the English language.

The tools at our disposal have sometimes allowed us to peer into events and trends that become, otherwise, obscured, by the ‘noise’ of the Twenty-four Hour News Cycle.

Our goal was, and continues to be, to extricate (and explicate upon) the true currents underpinning the events we call news, and to better understand what they mean and how they are perceived with the new media reality in mind.

For example, back in the days preceding the 2004 Presidential election cycle, GLM discovered the fact that once ideas, words and phrases were launched into the vast, uncharted, oceanic Internet, they do not, indeed, die out after twenty-four hours but, rather, travel in deep, powerful currents and waves (not unlike those of a tsunami) that only grow stronger as they make their ways to distant shores.

In this new reality, tsunami-like ideas pass through vast seas of information of the Internet, nearly undetected and often unmeasured, until they crash upon our shorelines, where their full power (and possibly fury) is unleashed.

The fact that we only entertain them for 24 hours before they are dispatched into the archives of what is considered ‘past’ or ‘passed’ and readily discarded, is beyond the point.

We often hear that ‘we’ve never seen anything like this’ before.Of course not.Think back a few hundred years to other information revolutions, such as that introduced along with mechanical type.What do you think the fortunate few thought when they first laid their eyes upon the works of Aristotle, the Bible, or the Arabic translations of Euclid?No one had ever seen anything like that before!Indeed.

And astonishment will only become more so as the future unfolds.

– Paul JJ Payack, President & Chief Word Analyst, The Global Language Monitor

‘Despair’ & ‘fear’ drowning out ‘Hope’ in Global Media

Comparison of 90-days since election to 9/11 and Start of Iraq War

 

Austin, TX February 10, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown are drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008. 

With thousands of global headlines centering on the deteriorating global economy followed by news of the human toll of people driven to despair and committing acts of desperation, GLM undertook an analysis of the language used in the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election.  GLM then compared their frequency of use to the ninety days following the 9/11 Terrorists attacks on New York and Washington in 2001 and the 90-day period following the outbreak of the Iraq War in 2003.  The representative fear-related words chosen:  Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate/Desperation.

The analysis found that these words were used in the last ninety days with 18-23% more frequency since the historic Obama election than when compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.  The one exception was that of the word fear, itself, though its use in relation to the economic meltdown was still some 85% of its use in the case of 9/11 and the Iraq War.

“The results are striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Omama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in,” ” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor. 

 

The specific breakdown of the keywords (and related variations) follows:

 

1. Abandoned — Abandoned appeared some 23% more frequently

2. Despair — Despair appeared some 18% more frequently

3. Desperation – Desperation appeared some 18% more frequently

4. Fear – Fear appeared some 85% of the frequency

Media and Analysts:  Call for Graphics



Top FashionSpeak of Fall 2009/10 Season

Chiconomics, Michele Obama, Sheer, Metallics, and Gladiator

 

 

Top FashionSpeak of Upcoming Fall/Winter 2009/10 Season

 

Austin, TX February 5, 2009 – Chiconomics, Michele Obama, Sheer, Metallics, and Gladiator were named the Top Fashion Buzzwords of the of Upcoming Fall/Winter 2009/10 Season by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com).  New York Fashion Week begins February 12th.

The words were chosen from those gathered from the worldwide fashion media and nominated by key fashionistas. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Predictive Quantities Index, a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

“The fashion world is affected by the global economic meltdown like everyone else this year and are reflected in this season’s buzzwords,” said Millie L. Payack, director and fashion correspondent of the Global Language Monitor.”  Another significant influence is that of Michele Obama as the first Lady of the United States, who already is subject of vast Internet and Blogosphere buzz.”  

The Top Fashion Buzzwords with commentary, follow: 

1.     Chiconomics – The drive to chicness remains strong though affected by economic crisis.

2.     Michele Obama – Michelle says ‘Yes, we can!’ to bringing back a sense of fashion to the White House; further popularizes the single-shoulder look.

3.     Sheer (not see-through, please!) – Though sheer is synonymous with see-through often to embarrassing results (See Renée Zellweger at the Golden Globes.)

4.     Metallics – Move over silver and gold this year it’s coppers and bronze as well as pewter tones.

5.     Gladiators – From chunky platforms to criss-crossed flats, one of the biggest shoe trends of the new century.

6.     Recessionista — Fashion designers, trend-setters and icons set out to weather the world economic crisis.

7.     Voluminous – As in volume-mungous.  Sometimes combined with the sheer look to dramatic results. 

8.     Ferosh – A combination of ‘fierce’ and ‘ferociousness’ popularized by Project Runway’s Christian Siriano.

9.     Shoe Boot – Or booties, favored by fashion-forward A-listers.

10.  Lemongrass – The color of Ms. Obama’s Inauguration gown (designed by Isabel Toledo).

11.  Draping or Grecian or goddess – The Greco-Roman goddess look continues its 2500-year comeback.

12.  Eco-Fashion – Couture with carbon-offsetting properties; the Green movement has not invaded haute couture – yet.

13.  On Trend – The ’oh so trendy’ way to say trendy.

14.  Ethnicware – Also known as Multicutural.

15.  Fast Fashion – The successor to High Street; the ability to produce low-cost knock-offs, includes such retailers as H&M and Target.

16.  Fruit Salad (or Macedonian) – Mixed prints are big and bold.

17.  Tie-dyed Silk – Black silk is everywhere even in tie-dyed creations.

18.  Muffin Top fashion – No worries on the runway but a muffin top is seen  when the belly spills over the waistband in exposed ‘midriff’ fashion.

19.  Palettes – Including Mimosa (yellow) and Blue Iris (purple).

20.  Tribe – Fashion tribes are still en vogue whether hipsters or EMOs.

Each July, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Fashion Cities of the Year ranked by Internet presence in a global survey.    Topping the list for 2008 were New York, Rome, Paris, Milan, London, Los Angeles, Sydney, Las Vegas, Berlin and Tokyo.  Madrid (No. 15), Stockholm (No. 20), Cape Town (No. 23) and New Delhi (No. 24) broke into the Top 25.  Notable movement included Sydney moving up five spots to No.7 and Dubai jumping up twelve spots to No.12. 



Trend: Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage on the Rise


Trend:  Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage

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on the Rise Since Obama’s inauguration

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‘Deficit of Trust’ and ‘Numbing weight of our political process’ appear to be keepers

Obama State of the Union at 8th Grade Level; Deft use of Passive Constructions

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Austin, TX February 1, 2010.  According to an exclusive analysis by the Global Language Monitor, the disillusionment, anger, and outrage acknowledged by President Obama in his State of the Union address has been on the rise since Obama’s election in November 2008.

“Much has been written about what the President in his State of the Union message called the ‘numbing weight of our political process’ and the ‘deficit of trust’ it thus engenders,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst.  “The disillusionment, anger and outrage should not be a surprise, especially to students of political language, who have been analyzing what is being said in the political realm over the last 18 months.  (That this comes as a revelation to our political elites, however, should serve, once again, as a sobering lesson or, even, cautionary tale.)”

Though little noticed by the media, GLM found that in early February, just weeks after the Obama inauguration, the ‘words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown were drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008’.

The representative fear-related words chosen:  Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate and/or Desperation.  In its analysis of the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election, GLM found that those words were used with 18-23% more frequency than compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.  (Even the word fear, itself, was at some 85% of the level it was used in the aftermath of both the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the onset of the Iraq War.)

In a separate but related study released in late March, Global Language Monitor found that the word ‘outrage’ had been used more in the global media that month than anytime this century, with the previous benchmark being the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  In particular, the word was used in association with the AIG bonuses, which had recently been distributed.

GLM examined the global print and electronic media for the seven days after the following events:  the 9/11 terrorist attacks in, the start of the Iraq War, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast.

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media:

1. AIG Bonuses, 2009

2. 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

State of the Union Linguistic Analysis

In an evaluation of the State of the Union message, GLM found that the President used the passive voice to deflect responsibility (a time-honored SOTU tradition), and according to the White House transcript there was an overabundance of semi-colons (two dozen plus), some used correctly others in a baffling manner.  And then there was the grammatical lapse in disagreement in number:  “Each of these institutions are (sic) full of honorable men and women ….”    For the record, the President’s address came in at the 8.6 grade level, use of the passive was about 5%, the Grade Level was 8.6 (a bit higher than his Grant Park speech), and reading ease at 62 on a scale of 100 (not as easy to read as to hear).

For more details, send email to editor@globallanguagemonitor.com or call 1.925.367.7557.



Michael Jackson

Jackson Joins yet another Hall of Fame

Michael Jackson Now One of Top Stories of 21st Century

Mainstream Media Ranking No.9; For the Internet No. 2 (to Obama’s Election)

Austin, TX June 29, 2009 (MetaNewswire) – The death of Michael Jackson, the entertainment icon, is now one of the top stories of the 21st century, according to a analysis released by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com). In the 72 hours after his death, Jackson jumped to the No. 9 spot for the global print and electronic media. For Internet, blogs and social media, Jackson jumped to the No.2, only trailing the election of Barack Obama to the presidency of the United States. The results showed the growing disparity between the mainstream global media, and what is playing out for news on the Internet, and beyond.

The citations for Michael Jackson in the Mainstream Media numbered in the thousands; his citations on the Internet, and beyond numbered in the millions. The analysis tracked news stories within the first seventy-two hours after the event. The events include in descending order of Internet citations include:  The Obama election, the death of Michael Jackson, the Iraq War, the Beijing Olympics, the Financial Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the death of Pope John Paul II, the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the Asian Tsunami.

Citations for the election of Barack Obama are five times greater than that of No. 2, Michael Jackson. In turn, the death of Michael Jackson is cited more than double than those for the beginning of the Iraq War in 2003.

“The death of Michael Jackson has resulted in a global media event of the first order” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM.  “The fact that he has broken into the top mediaof the 21st century is a testament to the global impact of the man and his music.”

Mainstream Global Media Internet, Blogs & Social Media
Rank Story Year Rank Story Year
1 Obama 2008 1 Obama 2008
2 Hurricane Katrina 2005 2 Michael Jackson 2009
3 Financial Tsunami 2008 3 Iraq War 2003
4 Iraq War 2003 4 Beijing Olympics 2008
5 9/11 Terrorist Attacks 2001 5 Financial Tsunami 2008
6 Beijing Olympics 2008 6 Hurricane Katrina 2005
7 Pope John Paul II 2005 7 Pope John Paul II 2005
8 S. Asian Tsunami 2005 8 9/11 Terrorist Attacks 2001
9 Michael Jackson 2009 9 S. Asian Tsunami 2005



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