“Milan” Tops Fashion Buzz of 2015; Kate’s Baby Girl (if and when) currently at No

The Eighth Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

NEW YORK, March 4, 2015 – Milan is the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2015 followed by, Suede, Booty, Kate’s Baby Girl, and Yellow Hues. Rounding out the Top Ten were Blue & White; Plus Size, Gingham, Shirt Dresses, and Trans Models. Wrapping up this year’s list are Denim, Flourishes, Corduroy, Retro Fashion, and Transparents.

Milan has been working hard to  re-establish  itself as the pre-eminent capital of Global Fashion, or at least to being consistently named as one of the Big Four. Milan last held the Top Spot in Global  Language Monitor’s annual ranking in 2008.  Much of the internet mediabuzz, not all of it positive, revolves upon these efforts to revive its ‘brand’.  [Update:  The recent reports from Milan were not favorable.]

“In a time besodden with violence and horrors perpetrated against women and girls, the world of fashion stands out as a beacon of self-affirming light to celebrate the inherent beauty and dignity of every woman, and her ability transform herself in whatever way she sees fit,” said Rebecca Roman, Manhattan-based Fashion Director for GLM.

Each year, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Global Fashion Capitals. in the latest ranking, New York topped Paris and London followed by Los Angeles, Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.  The Top Global Fashion for 2015 will be announced prior to Spring Fashion Weeks in the Fall. For the current list of the Top 50 Fashion Capitals Go here

 

The Top Fashion Buzzwords of 2015 follow:

Rank, Buzzword, Comment

  1. Milan — Lots of buzz and not all good as it tries to claw its way back to the top.
  2. Suede — Fifty shades of Suede.
  3. Booty — Last year it was underbutt, this year just butt (S/O To Kim K.).
  4. Kate’s Baby girl — A little princess waiting in the wings?
  5. Yellow Hues —  Dozens of yellow hues from which to choose:  Lemon yellow, marigold, primrose, saffron, vermillion, canary, ….
  6. Blue & White — Edging in on the Black & White.
  7. Plus Size — Models ahead of the curve(s).
  8. Gingham –Not talking about Little House on the Prairie here .
  9. Shirt Dresses — Even sweater dresses..
  10. Trans Models — Transgender Models now making an impact on the Red Carpet.
  11. Denim — This time as dresses.
  12. Flourishes — Fringe, Feathers and Tassels.
  13. Corduroy — Moving well beyond the halls of academe.
  14. Retro Fashion — Hmmm, this year retro moves on to the ’70s.
  15. Transparents — Sheers, and Peek-a-Boos.

Methodology:  GLM’s various word analyses are longitudinal in nature covering a number of years that varies with the particular analysis.  The rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  GLM analyses billions of web pages, millions of blogs, 300,000 print and electronic news organizations, and new social media sites as they emerge.  To qualify for GLM’s lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Top Fashion Buzzwords of previous years include:

  • All Things New York (2014)
  • London (2013)
  • the Princess Effect (2012)
  • Kate Middleton (2011)
  • Lady Gaga (2010), and
  • Chiconomics (2009)
About the Global Language Monitor
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.
Today, from its home in Austin, Texas Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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