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MicroEssay: The Future of Global English (400 Years in the Future)

A Short Essay by Paul JJ Payack

The conquest of Global English is nearly complete. It is impossible to hold back this tide. The Tsunami of English has already swept over the earth. The question now is how to adjust to this new reality.

I have several suggestions. The first would be to master the language. Yes, acknowledge the sea-change, disassociate yourself from any political misgivings — and get on with it. Global English is here and now — and here to stay. Global English will reside, preside and thrive. At least in some form. Here are some possible threads of evolution (or devolution) of the language over the next 400 years. I chose this perspective because that is the same temporal distance we are from the days of Shakespeare and the King James Bible.

Keeping in mind that the best way to predict the future is to read the past, here are a number of differing scenarios, one of which will be the future of Global English

1. Cyber English: The robots take control of the language. This form of English would be ‘clipped’ and very precise (no ‘fuzzy’ logic here). Come to think of it, this would be a great leap backward to the time of the King’s English, as spoken in, say, Colonial India.

2. The Romanticization of English: The Language devolves into various local dialects that in time become robust languages in themselves. The precedent for this, of course, is Latin splintering into the Romance Languages (Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish). As Latin is still the Official Language of the Vatican City state, English will remain spoken in certain enclaves in North Carollina, western Virginia, and in the Desert Southwest.

3. Return to Proto-Indo-European. Not as outlandish as it might seem, as the Green movement decries the technological basis of much of Global English, and in a Back-to-Basics promotes the original P-I-E as a ‘green language’.

4. English captured by the Chinese: the Middle Kingdom strikes back and begins to stake a claim in English Language ownership, much as America has done so during the last century. The Chinese prove to be excellent caretakers of the language and develop many interesting ways to extend it throughout the Earth and beyond.

5. Revenge of the Nerds: Leetspeak Strikes Back. The Nerds control the language. All words have dozens of spellings and meanings. Letters, numbers and symbols intermix. Exposition is heavily encrypted. The precedent: The English language before the Noah Webster and the OED. Shakespeare’s many variations on his name is mere child’s play to the near-infinite variety of spelling your children’s children will be able to use for their names.

6. The Number of Words in the English Language
Academics will no longer fret at counting the number of words because the conquest of English will no longer be tainted by political, cultural, and social concerns. Once freed from these concerns, Everyone will be free to count words in the same manner that their scientific colleagues count the number of galaxies, stars and atomic nuclei.

We will then be able to count ALL the words: every name of every fungus, all the technical jargon, YouthSpeak, all the –Lishes, everything.

Dictionaries will not longer be the arbiters what’s a word? Questions of standing the test of time will be rendered inoperable. Words will bubble forth as a frothy sea-foam of insight and meaning. If a word is used by millions or even thousands of influential elites, regardless of class or any form of identity (gender, ethnic, class, national, or social) it will be deemed a word and recorded for posterity.

7. There will be no words only thoughts. This is a rather difficult scenario to explore, since words all but disappear. Dictionaries will be replaced by something much more ethereal, sort of like a directory of dreams, ideas and ideals.

The language will swell to tens of millions of ‘words’ and the fact of its crossing the 1,000,000, word barrier will be looked upon something quite quaint that happened in the ‘classic days’ of ‘Global English language (long before it assumed its then-current exalted position. In all probability, the words in this essay may seem closer to the works of Shakespeare and those of the King James Bible than those of the, say, twenty-fifth Century.

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Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016, Thus Far: Bigly, Brexit & Non-binary

Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016, Thus Far: Bigly, Brexit & Non-binary

AUSTIN, Texas July 15-17, 2016 – Bigly, Brexit, and ‘Non-binary’ lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016 thus far, followed by the Prince Symbol, Zika, Gun Violence / Gun Culture, Safe Place, Heroin and fentanyl according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor, the big data, trend tracking consultancy.

This is preliminary to GLM’s fourteenth annual Word of the Year (#WOTY) rankings that will be released on November 16, 2016.

“By the sixteenth year of the 20th century, the world was already awash in the trends that would influence the rest of the century, reaching all the way into the early 21st century.” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “The twenty-first century trends that accompany these words might similarly portend far greater events than they represent today..”

The Top Trending Words of 2016 are listed below (Rank, Word, and Comment).

Top Trending Words for 2016, thus far.

Rank, Word, Commentary

1. Bigly — Things trending larger … bigly. Almost everything trended bigly thus far in 2016 from politics and foreign affairs, to terrorism and gun violence,

2, Brexit — The British Exit from the European Union provides a new vocabulary for future political breakups: Scotxit, Quebecxit and, even, Texit.

3. Non-binary — A legal term for a gender identity between male and female

4. Perhaps the first emoji. The unpronounceable symbol representing the singer formerly known as Prince.

5. Zika — Please note that Rio is not on this list; its spot was taken by the Zika Virus. A potential global pandemic with Rio as its epicenter.

6. Gun Culture / Gun Violence — Gun Culture/Gun Violence are neck-and neck in the ranking here.

7. Safe Place — In the US, places where students can retreat to avoid hearing unpleasant words; in the world, places protected from rape, crucifixion, being sold into slavery, and the like.

8. Heroin and Fentanyl — More deaths from opioids in the US than gun violence and auto accidents combined. Where is the outrage?

9. Hooya ha tah iti bin — “Son please don’t smuggle yourself.” Transliteration of a Somali mother’s plea to her son not to join the refugee flow into Europe.

10. Memory Care — Current euphemism for Alzheimer care.

11. Presumptive — Presumptive Republican nominee, presumptive Democratic nominee, presumptive prime minister, etc. In 2016 the word ‘presumptive’ is bigly.

12. Texticate — Facebook, messaging, twitter, email … everything is reduced to text… the textication of the world as we know it.

13. Clintonworld — The private world of Hil and Bill where many of the laws of the political world seem to be suspended. Cf. Steve Job’s ‘reality distortion field’.

14. Trumpism — The emerging political philosophy of the presumptive Republican candidate,whatever that may be.

15. Tennessine — New element on the periodic table, with Atomic number 117 and the symbol Ts. Some wags say to honor Bluegrass, more likely the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Others under consideration a number of trending words that not yet meet the triple threshold test, but might qualify as the year further unfolds.

In December 2015, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that Microaggression in its various manifestations was the Top Word of 2015.— The brief, everyday exchanges that send mostly unintended derogatory messages to members of various minority groups.

Related to the following terms:

Safe Space — In universities protecting students feelings by warning of subject matter that might elicit discomfit or distress.
Trigger — Any action that might elicit feelings of discomfit or distress.
Unsafe — The feelings a student encounters when without warning they are confronted with subject matter or situations that have elicited feelings of discomfit or distress.
Snowflake — What unconcerned students call those with the need for safe spaces and warnings about possible trigger events.

Migrant Crisis was the Top Phrase of 2015, while Donald J. Trump, was the surprise Top Name of 2015.

To see the Top Words of 2015, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, as well as the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Harvard Captures Top Politically (in)Correct Word of the Year Award

Global Language Monitor’s Ninth Biennial List of Top Politically (in)Correct Words for 2016 and 2015

“House Masters” No More

Follows the lead of Los Angeles County Purchasing Department in 2004.

 

Politically Correct Emoji

 

Austin, Texas, November 3, 2016 — Harvard University captured the Top Politically (in)Correct Word of the Year Award in the Global Language Monitor’s Ninth Biennial List for 2016 and 2015.

Harvard won the award for supplanting the ancient and honored title of “House Master” for the rather amorphous yet politically neutral title of ‘faculty dean’.  Harvard undergraduates live in residence dorms called ‘houses’ modeled on the colleges of Oxbridge and other Medieval European universities.

Of course, when Faculty of Arts and Sciences dean Michael D. Smith announced the change, he responded to criticism that the change reflected a misunderstanding of the word “master” as possibly connected to America’s history of slavery,  Not so, he contended. “None of these [contentions] could be farther from the truth”.  Nota Bene:  Harvard’s motto is a single word ‘Veritas,’ Latin for Truth.

The unanswered question remains, what, if anything, the university plans to do with the more than 4,000 masters degrees awarded at Harvard’s 365th Commencement on May 26, 2016, let alone the tens of thousands awarded over the last three centuries.

Of course, the Harvard administration’s decision was not without precedent, it followed the actions of the Los Angeles County Purchasing department.  In computer terminology, “master/slave” refers to primary and secondary hard disk drives. But a Los Angeles County purchasing department told vendors in late 2003 that the term was offensive and violated the region’s cultural diversity. The county’s department of affirmative action undertook a hunt to replace it on software product packaging. After a public uproar, the county backed down. Payack said that while the incident took place in late 2003, the debate about it continued into 2004.

“We label these words and phrases Politically (in)Correct because of the fierce debate they often stir and incur,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “People spanning the  political spectrum can find the phrases politically ‘correct’ or ‘incorrect’ depending on their particular views”.

To see the Top Trending Words of 2016 thus far go here.

Microaggression, in its Various Forms was the Top Word for 2015
Microaggression, in its Various Manifestations, was the Top Word for 2015  To see all the Top Words of 2015 Click here.

The University also placed a plaque naming four slaves who labored for two of its presidents some of its buildings in the 17th and 18th centuries.  The plaque ‘honored’ four people:  Titus, Venus, Juba, and Bilhah.  No surnames were ever recorded, while first names were adopted from those used in imperial Rome.  Bilhah was listed in the President’s journal as a “Negro Wench”.

In a related case, a Harvard Law School committee proposed to retire the school’s shield (crest) that was adopted in 1936. The contention was that it was modeled on the family crest of the slave-holding Royall family.  The Royall family endowed Harvard’s first professorship of law.

The shield, itself consists of  a stylized Veritas written on three books with three sheafs of wheat.  The connection to slavery is nowhere implied.

harvard-law-shield

Historical Note:  After slavery was outlawed in Massachusetts, the school continued to prosper from the mills throughout New England that used the cotton which the slaves produced as well as the oils obtained from the near extinction of the whales, as well as the land appropriated from the local native American tribes.

Meanwhile, dozens of colleges and universities around the country experienced disruptions about historical associations to slavery and crimes against Native Americans.

 

The Top Politically (in)Correct Words of 2015 -2016 follow:

  1. Harvard University changed the titles of the leadership of it Residential System ‘Houses’ from  ‘Masters’ to ‘faculty deans’.
  2. Harvard Law School is dropping the design of its ‘shield’ because it was based upon that of the slave-holding Royall family.
  3. Non-binary —  A legal term for a gender identity between male and female.
  4. Cisgender is a newly popular term for one whose gender identity matches their sex.
  5. Gettysburg College shows a video to incoming first-year students “who identify as male” (freshman) on “toxic masculinity”.
  6. According to 35 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say:   complimenting someone as being well-spoken.can be taken as a micro-aggression.
  7. A sign at Pomona College:advised students to  “acknowledge your privilege” and “apologize if you’ve used  words like “sassy”.  Additionally, the sign claims that all white people are racist. “Understand that you are white, so it is inevitable that you have unconsciously learned racism,” states the poster. “Your unearned advantage must be acknowledged and your racism unlearned.”
  8. Indigenous People’s Day—which serves as a counter-celebration to Columbus Day in order to celebrate Native American culture and history—has steadily increased in popularity since its founding in the 1990s, with major cities, such as Portland, Oregon, and Minneapolis, and the state of Alaska.  Brown Unversity faculty members endorsed a student suggestion to rename Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The idea took a quarter of a century to arrive at the Ivy League university.
  9. The Patriarchy as a governing societal structure is to be questioned on all levels.
  10. Amherst College is dropping the “Lord Jeff (rey Amherst)” nickname because of Lord Jeffrey’s ties to eradication efforts kill Native Americans by distributing smallpox-contaminated blankets to them. There has been no word of changing the name of the college, itself.

    These Politically (in)Correct words are automatically nominated to Global Language Monitor’s 17th Annual Word of the Year #WOTY announcement for Global English at year’s end.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For More Information email info@languageMonitor.com.

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An Outsider’s Path to Victory was Foreseeable from the Start

Why the Outsider Won

trump-truncated

 

GLM has been tracking the Outsider since at least 2006

This article is an accounting of the Global Language Monitor’s public record of the rise of the underlying forces that have disrupted long-held economic theories and political assumptions. These forces recently culminated in the election of what we are calling The Outsider to the presidency of the United States. We are citing published accounts only (The Hill, New York Times, BBC, NPR) to highlight the predictive ability of our Trend Tracking and Narrative Tracking technologies. We are updating this article daily, extending the story in chronological order. We are presently citing the underlying forces in the run-up to the election of Barack Obama that presage the events of 2016.

In the meantime, if you would like an interview or any additional information, please call 001.512.801.6823 or reach out to us through email at info@LanguageMonitor.com.

Austin, TEXAS, November 8, 2016 — Though there appears to be great shock around the world that an ‘outsider’ has actually captured the White House, to this organization an Outsider’s path to victory was foreseeable from the start. — actually at least since 2006. It was five years earlier that China had been admitted into the fellowship of the world’s major trading blocks and by ‘06 it was as if the West had been struck by a five trillion (then twelve-trillion, now fifteen trillion-) dollar rogue asteroid that both astronomers and economists had missed.

Since that time, the economies of the West have witnessed entire industries being destabilized, shackled and shuttered. And before anyone truly understood the true economic implications, vast areas of once thriving cities, states, and regions had been transformed into seemingly post-apocalyptic wastelands.

There is a particular type of nuclear weapon that is seldom mentioned because it is considered an especially hideous — the neutron bomb. The sole purpose of the neutron bomb is to destroy any and all forms of life while leaving the man-made infrastructure (factories, hospitals, schools and the like) untouched and in place.

A quick imaginary flyover of the US reveals burned out factories of Detroit, the abandoned steel mills of the Allegheny and Ohio Valleys, the shuttered coal mines in the hidden hollows (and the mountain-topped towns) of Appalachia, the empty Main streets opioid-addled and addicted towns of New England will help you assess the devastation wrecked by a neutron bomb for yourself. (See A Recession Neither great Nor Small published in TheHill.)

Western History has long celebrated the decency of the common man from the amphitheaters of Athens, to the fisherman-disciples of Jesus, the Noble Savage of the Enlightenment, the citizens of the Founders, and the proletariat of the New Socialist Man. Now, when the millions of the dispossessed cried out in anguish and pain, they were decried as out-of-step with the post-Modern world, as racists, as Luddites, and uneducable. You will not find any contemporary Aaron Copeland, dare writing and performing a new “Fanfare for the Common Man,” without being hooted off the stage.

And yet some wonder why since the turn of the century there has been a swelling undercurrent, a seething restlessness, a mostly hidden wellspring of anger, vitriol and disappointment making its way through the body politic. All too often, this undercurrent was dismissed as irrelevant, inconsequential and certainly not worthy of serious consideration, let alone study.

In 2016 the West is experiencing a populist uprising, not seen since the barricades, protests, riots, and assassinations of 1968, though this cycle is decidedly more peaceful, with the anger, rage and frustration thus far, channeled through the ballot box.

At first observers had the luxury of blaming this undercurrent on forces outside an individual’s control: 9/11, the Iraq War, G.W. Bush (and Dick Cheney), the Global War on Terrorism and the elusive Osama bin Laden, the Housing Bubble, Lehman Brothers, and the beginning of the Great Recession, which was actually just another manifestation of the Global Economic Restructuring.

At the time, the election of Barack Obama was heralded as a full stop in History, a break with the past, the dawn of a new post-racial era, certainly in the US, if not the world, even as an avatar of a new age. But trouble was brewing, as GLM, seeming alone had picked up,  (See Trend: Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage on the Rise Since Obama’s Inauguration.)

*****

Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst said at the time that “The disillusionment, anger and outrage should not be a surprise, especially to students of political language, who have been analyzing what is being said in the political realm over the last 18 months. (That this comes as a revelation to our political elites, however, should serve, once again, as a sobering lesson or, even, cautionary tale.)”

Though little noticed by the media, GLM found that in early February, just weeks after the Obama inauguration, the ‘words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown were drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008’.  In its analysis of the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election, GLM found that those words were used with 18-23% more frequency than compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003. (Even the word fear, itself, was at some 85% of the level it was used in the aftermath of both the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the onset of the Iraq War.)

In a related study Global Language Monitor found that the word ‘outrage’ had been used more in the global media that month than anytime this century, with the previous benchmark being the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In particular, the word was used in association with the AIG bonuses, which had recently been distributed.

GLM examined the global print and electronic media for the seven days after the following events: the 9/11 terrorist attacks in, the start of the Iraq War, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast.

*****

GLM’s analysis shows that these undercurrents of Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage on the rise Since Obama’s Inauguration.could be found in earlier data, underscoring the strength and significance of the find.

 

Now, some eight years into the ‘new era’ the news has been full of various elites’ recriminations about how they got it so wrong. These apologia have been characterized as revelations, surprises, astonishments, and/or mis-measurements. Translation: the measuring of data no longer meaningful, undergirded by assumptions about a world that no longer (If it ever) existed.

The Global Language Monitor has been tracking the disruptive undercurrent that has been seething beneath the surface of the 21st century, theories, speculations, and statistical analysis since the housing crisis — two years before the first Obama Inauguration.

GLM charted the meteoric rise of the charismatic and charming political star, we also tracked the burgeoning undercurrent that followed from the crash of the Housing Bubble and only gained momentum with the fall of Lehman Brothers, and ensuing financial dislocation, the Global Economic Restructuring, from which the economy has yet to recover. Clinging to their outdated surmises, theories, and premises, the old guard is insistent on defending their numbers ad absurdia. Yes, the number of jobs has approached pre-great recession levels, however, they fail to admit that two part-time jobs do not equate two pre-great recession (or even one) pre-recession full-time jobs.

Now that the pundits have missed the ongoing electoral tsunami in 2016, for much the same reasons they missed the political rage, and anger boiling beneath the surface that has resulted in the ‘Outsider, phenomenon’.

Now, reading the accounts of the various experts, pundits and luminaries on how they ‘missed’ the Outsider phenomenon, is a study in how an isolated group of highly educated, intelligent, yet like-minded individuals, can create a sort of bubble that contains the only the things they expect to see and only those words they expect to hear. All else is cast as non-logical, ignorant, inconsistent, and most certainly not worthy of consideration. In this regard the last ten years read almost like a Harvard B-School Case Study.

The premise of our research is that economists and politicians were and unfortunately continue to use are missing the essence of the profound worldwide economic transformation that has been underway for quite some time. Unfortunately, this economic restructuring will continue unabated far into the future, unless and until the new economic reality is no longer constrained by this profoundly limited vision.

To date the facts have borne out our original assumptions:

  • The economy is not behaving as expected because were, are using outdated tools that need to be rethought.
  • Since we are using outdated tools and tracking systems,we continue to measure the economy as if it were the Reagan or Clinton years.
  • The recovery did not mirror previous recoveries in the US, and the traditional manufacturing sector continues to erode.
  • The Global Economic Restructuring has continued unabated.
  • China continues its seemingly inexorable rise; The US and the West continue to struggle.
  • The Lost Decade of Japan has indeed being replicated to varying degrees in the West.

And so it goes into the race for the 2016 Presidential Elections.

Since 2003, the Global Language Monitor has been tracking political trends through Big-Data English language analysis. We do not track pre-determined words, concepts, or names, rather we analyze the LinguaSphere to understand the ongoing global conversation. In this way, all personal, predetermined viewpoints and preconceptions are eliminated, or at least held to a minimum.

In this way, GLM specializes in finding what is not readily apparent or is trending only beneath the surface.

While the world celebrated the oncoming Hope and Change transformation, as did we, GLM also measured the massive undercurrents swirling beneath the surface. We then compared them to the 90 days following the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the 90 days after the launch of Shock and Awe campaign presaging the invasion of Iraq. The results were certainly counter-intuitive, if not shocking:

It is this undercurrent that GLM has been tracking since then that lead directly to the current election cycle.

Every year since then, the underlying conditions for the Middle have deteriorated, while the political pundits obscure reality in order to increase their political fortunes while those of the Middle Class have fallen asunder.

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact. The amount of anger and outrage as ignored by the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

To be continued…

In the meantime, if you would like an interview or any additional information, please call 001.512.801.6823 or reach out to us through email at info@LanguageMonitor.com.

To be continued…

In the meantime, if you would like an interview or any additional information, please call 001.512.801.6823 or reach out to us through email at info@LanguageMonitor.com.

RIO Ambush Marketing Awards: Nike Takes Gold, Pepsi & Siemens Follow

Samsung, McDonald’s and General Electric Sweep TOP Sponsor Gold, Silver, and Bronze

P&G Stumbles, Omega (Finally) Shines

Rio logo

U.S. Labour Day Weekend 2016, Austin, Texas — The Global Language Monitor has announced that Nike has taken its first ever Gold for the Top Ambush Marketing Campaign. Pepsi took the Silver outdistancing Top Sponsor (and global competitor) Coke by a Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) score of 130.40 to 89.59, a 40% advantage. Ever-strong Siemens AG won the Bronze, even though GE, its major global competitor, nipped Siemens by 5.78 BAI points.

This all according to the exclusive 2016 Rio Summer Olympics Brand Scorecard available now for download.

Gold Rio
Nike Takes the Gold , Finishing Behind Top Sponsor Samsung
Silver Rio
Pepsi Outduels Arch-rival Coke, Winning by Some 50 BAI Points
Bronze Rio
Siemens Took, Bronze, though Top Sponsor GE Beat it.

Among the Top Sponsors, Samsung more than doubled the score of a resurgent McDonald’s. McDonald’s Silver Medal performance was its top finish since at least the Vancouver Games. GE took the Bronze with its highest ever score of 129.98.

The Games of the XXXI Olympiad recently concluded on August 21, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The biggest surprise among all marketers was newcomer Under Armour breaking into the Top Fifteen overall and outdistancing six of the Top Sponsors.

Not all Ambush Marketers are ‘stealth’ marketers per se. Some like Under Armour, a prime Non-affiliated Marketer (NAM) are top of mind in the global audience because of their relevant products and target markets. Nevertheless, this makes Under Amour a prime example of a ‘value leak’ and the recipient of an Olympic Economic Value Unit worth up to several hundred million dollars for this Olympiad,

Samsung more than doubled the score of a resurgent McDonald’s. McDonald’s Silver Medal performance was its top finish since at least the Vancouver Games. GE took the Bronze, a remarkable feat for a B2B enterprise.

Gold Rio
Samsung Wins Top Sponsor Gold with Highest Ever Score
Silver Rio
Resurgent McDonald’s Scores Silver
Bronze Rio
GE Won the Bronze, a Major Feat for the B2B Giant
UnderArmour Takes the Most Promising Newcomer Award, a Sheaf of Wheat
UnderArmour Takes the Most Promising Newcomer Award, a Sheaf of Wheat

GLM is continuing its analysis of such Economic Value Units and how they apply to global athletic events such as the Olympics and FIFA World Cups and to lesser extent the Commonwealth, Pan-American, and Asian Games, and the like. There is little question that the IOC is quite cognizant of the consequences of the of EVUs, but other than further tightening it restrictions against the usage of the Olympic ‘elements,’ such as the rings and nomenclature, little has been done to tighten and/or eliminate the presence of ‘Value Leaks’.

The awards are determined by Global Language Monitor’s (GLM) Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), a proprietary, longitudinal study that analyzes the global association between (and among) individual brands and their competitors or, in this case, the Rio Summer Games. In the study, The Global Language Monitor measured several dozen factors, closely examining all marketing movement extending from London 2012 to projections for Tokyo 2020.

GLM has been tracking the Olympics in this manner since the Beijing Summer Games.

Rio Brand Scorecard
RIO Olympics Brand Scorecard Now Available

About the Study

Download the Study Now!

Read the Stories behind the Stories — The 2016 Rio Summer Olympics Brand Scorecard.– and there were more twists on the road to the Rio Summer Games 2016 than the hottest telenovela on BrazilianTV!

GLM’s analysis is part of GLM’s on-going longitudinal study stretching back to the Summer Games in Beijing (2008) and forward to the Winter Games in Beijing in 2022. The study uses GLM’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) to track how often brand names are linked to the Olympics in global print and electronic media and social networks. GLM also uses the Entity Affiliation Index (EAI), to track non-branded entities in the same manner. The Zika virus is such a non-branded entity.

Hundreds of millions of dollars were won or lost depending on the the all-important BAI ranking.of the articular TOP Sponsor. For the first time the concept of Economic Value Unit is introduced to try to capture the actual values of an Ambush Marketers effort.

The figure below shows the final scores of all the Top Sponsors and Non-affiliated Marketers for the Rio Summer Games of 2016.

Final Ranking BAI

The figure below shows the change in scores from from Week 1 measurements to to the final BAI measurement of the Rio Games.

Final BAI Ranking and Change

There was an unprecedented amount of change since our ’18 Months Out, measurement. This seems to reflect the continuous flow of negative stories surrounding the Rio Olympics during that period. Negative Olympic-related stories: impeaching and subsequent replacement of the president, the emerging global Zika emergency, missed construction deadlines. poor ticket sales, toxic water venues, and the like.

NBC optimistically maintained its average 26 million viewers, a 15% decline from the 2012 Summer Games’ draw of 31.1 million viewers and a 17.5 rating. (Rio’s ratings reflect NBC’s Total Audience Delivery that includes streaming and various other NBC-owned cable properties.

GLM’s pre-Olympic analysis found combined BAI references at 1.5% of London.

Change from 18 Months Out

The Terra Cotta medal, first awarded to Omega after the Sochi Winter Games in 2014, represents the least successful marketing campaign by a TOP Sponsor.

Terra Cotta awarded to TOP Sponsor least achieving epectations
Terra Cotta awarded to TOP Sponsor least achieving expectations

This year’s recipient is Procter & Gamble (P&G). As shown below, Procter & Gamble plummeted to Its Lowest BAI Level at least since the Beijing Olympics.

This is a shocking result for a company that finished as the NO. 1 TOP Sponsor at Sochi. GLM actually combined all P&G branded entities advertised at the Games.

Procter & Gamble Plummeted to Its Lowest BAI Level
Procter & Gamble Plummeted to Its Lowest BAI Level

GLM uses its proprietary algorithmic services to perform brand audits, enabling organizations to judge their brand performance between and among their competitors and their peers. The higher the BAI (Brand Affiliation Index) the closer the brand affiliation with the primary brand, in this case the RIO Summer Olympics.

Of course, not all Ambush Marketers plan to steal the Olympic glow from their competitors, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad. Therefore, GLM uses the term Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) for those, like Under Armour, who seem to engender a false impression of Olympic sponsorship, our research shows, because immense presence in associated categories and size,

About the Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

First Rio Olympics Brand Scorecard: UnderArmour Hot; Samsung and Nike Lead

Under Armour Makes a Splash

Coke Strong

P&G Falters Further

Rio logo

Austin, Texas, Olympic Weekend August 19-21, 2016 — The first Brand Scorecard of the Rio Olympics is in the can, and as usual Michael Phelps, is raking in an unprecedented amount of gold, as are the top Ambush Marketers of the 2016 Summer Games. This according to the Rio 2016 Olympics Brand Scorecard, the on-going longitudinal study by the Global Language Monitor, now tracking its sixth Olympiad. The study tracks the value leaks occurring when the Ambush Marketers siphon off some of the brand equity that by rights belong to the TOP Sponsors who pay hundreds of millions of dollars to secure these rights. GLM believes that fully loaded, TOP Sponsors spend up to a billion dollars per Olympiad to support their sponsorships.

BAI Scores for Week 1 & 2
Rio Olympics BAI Scores for Week 1 & 2

According to Paul JJ Payack, president of the Global Language Monitor, “Beneath the glitter and the gold of the Games themselves, the Rio Olympics are plagued by a grim undercurrent of poverty, political malaise, and a failing infrastructure. In the same manner, directly beneath the glamorous, high impact Olympic-themed ad campaigns of the TOP Sponsors, lurk the stealth (and sometimes not so stealth) campaigns of the Ambushers.”

The Global Language Monitor’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) tracks the closeness of the relationship between branded entities in this case, the Rio Summer Olympics and its TOP Sponsors. Eighteen months ago the average BAI between and among the Rio Olympics and its TOP Sponsors registered higher than that of the London Summer Games. After the deluge of bad news engulfed the on-coming Games, the BAI tumbled to about half the London levels until beginning to rise, once again, about three months ago.

Rio BAI Change by Percent

Rio BAI Change by Percent

Buy the Book Now!

Click on the Above Book to Download Now!

TOP Sponsors for RIO
The TOP Sponsors of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics are: Atos Origin (EPA: ATO), Bridgestone (TYO: 5108), Coca-cola (NYSE: KO), Dow (NYSE: DOW.WD), GE (NYSE: GE), McDonald’s (NYSE: MCD), Omega SA (Private), Panasonic (TYO: 6752), P&G (NYSE: PG), Samsung (KRX: 005930), and Visa Card (NYSE: V).
Top Non-affiliated Marketers
The top Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) or Ambush Marketers of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics are: DuPont (NYSE: DD), IBM Global Services (NYSE: IBM), Michelin (EPA: ML), Nike (NYSE: NKE), Pepsi (NYSE: PEP), Philips (NYSE: PHG), Red Bull GmbH (Private), Rolex (Private), Siemens (AG ETR: SIE), Starbucks (NASDAQ: SBUX), Subway (Private), Under Armour and Unilever (NYSE: UL)

About the Study

Download the Study Now!

The 2016 Rio Summer Olympics Brand Scorecard.– GLM’s analysis is part of GLM’s on-going longitudinal study stretching back to the Summer Games in Beijing (2008) and forward to the Winter Games in Beijing in 2022. The study uses GLM’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) to track how often brand names are linked to the Olympics in global print and electronic media and social networks. GLM also uses the Entity Affiliation Index (EAI), to track non-branded entities in the same manner. The Zika virus is such a non-branded entity.

For the Rio Summer Games 2016 there are eleven Official Top Sponsors:

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has strict regulations in place to protect its official international partners and prevent ambushing official Olympic partners and sponsors, such as Rule 40 of the Olympic Charter which prohibits athletes working with non-affiliated marketers during the Games, though there are reports that the rule is being modified for RIO.

Methodology. Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 350,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

For more information call +1.512.815.8836 or email: Info@LanguageMonitor.com.

The Impact of Fashion on Presidential Campaigns

The 2016 Pesidential Elections

The 2016 Pesidential Elections

 Read Vanessa Friedman’s Take in the New York Times

Austin, Texas February 1, 2016   The 2016 major-party election candidates provide perhaps as broad a set of individuals as ever assembled for the Quadrennial White House scramble: a brash New Your billionaire, with perhaps another waiting on the sideline, a former first Lady (and senator & Secretary of State), a former high tech CEO, a soft-spoken neurosurgeon, a number of Evangelicals, a pastor,  former governors, a hopeful member of a political dynasty, and a handful of minority candidates, among others.

It is a historical truism that a young, tanned, and relaxed John F. Kennedy won his 1960 televised debate with a sickly, sweaty Richard M. Nixon because JFK wore blue shirt and the just released from the hospital, Nixon grew a five o’clock shadow. A follow-up study found that Nixon won the debate among those who listened to the debate on radio, while Kennedy was declared the winner with those who viewed the debate on television.

Kennedy Proved the Victor Over Nixon -- on Style Points
Kennedy Proved the Victor Over Nixon — on Style Points

Fifty-six years later, in an age where image is key (namely The Optic) thanks to the likes of ubiquitous cell phones (read: cameras), combined with applications with hundred of millions of users (like Facebook, Twitter and Vine), an analysis of each candidate’s sartorial choices is a worthy area of investigation.

So far, we’ve seen Mr. Rubio’s high(er) heals from the mall, Hillary’s expanded palette for her designer pantsuits, Mr. Trump’s loud, outrageous, sometime obnoxious ties, Sanders in his glorious dishevelment, Carly as the avenging CEO warrior from Silicon Valley, Hillary in her ever-the-same, ever changing pantsuits, and the like, and to think that it all officially officially begins today….

 

Two Top Democratic Contenders: Clinton and Sanders
Two of the Top Republican Contenders
Two of the Top Republican Contenders

The Global Language Monitor, annually presents a study of the Top Global Fashion Capitals; in the same manner GLM recently conducted a study of the Major US Presidential Candidates and subjected them to a slightly modified criteria of that which it has used in its Top Global Fashion Capitals ranking.

For our purposes, the candidates sartorial styles were divided into several categories, plus an overall winner that will surprise few. The country is again entering another period of transition. The fact remains that Mr. Obama is leaving office with the same approval rating as his predecessor, GW Bush (hovering around 48%). Again, there is tremendous uncertainty in the land, on all sides of the political spectrum.
And once again, the voting public appears to be fascinated with their shiny, new toy(s): Trump, Sanders, Carson, Rubio, Fiorina, Cruz, etc.

For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear.

This is GLM’s first study of Fashion in Politics, though it has been tracking differing issues in politics for about a decade and here and even into the future, here.

The results of the study will be published on February 1, 2016 …here is a Top Level Overview, which will be deconstucted below.

Total Score for Presidential Candidates
Total Score for Presidential Candidates:  This chart will be deconstructrd later on Februry 1.

 

This Total Scores for Presidential Candidates, of both major parties.   This chart provides a top- overview of all seventeen candidates for both the Democratic and Republican parties.  Also included are potential candidates who might later enter the fray, such as Michael Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren, and Joe Biden.

The Candidates that are being tracked follow:

  • Bernie Sanders
  • Carly Fiorina
  • Chris Christie
  • Donald Trump
  • Elizabeth Warren
  • Hillary Clinton
  • Jeb Bush
  • Jim Gilmore
  • Joe Biden
  • John Kasich
  • Marco Rubio
  • Martin
  • Michael Bloomberg
  • Mike Huckabee
  • Rand Paul
  • Rick SantorumTed Cruz

Of course, some half dozen of these candidates will be out of the race in the next several days.

You can find a Brief Sartorial Overview of US Presidents here.

 

Overall Candidate Fashion Ranking

Overall, Donald Trump outdistances the field, which could be expected for the Trump PR Machine.  However, doubling the score of the second grouping of Cruz, Clinton, Christie, Bush and Biden, suggests that he’s gaining a significant number of style points.

The bottom four candodates would normally rate an asterisk (*) but the actual scores, themselves tell their own

This is a very interesting chart with Chris Christie topping the chart, closely followed by Cruz and Trump.

Clinton and Sanders are equally matched which is interesting because Sander’s overall demeanor is that of a wide-eyed, democratic socialist frpm a very small (read: inconsequential) state.  Come to think of it that WAS his demeaner for most of his decades-long career.

Interesting to note is Marco Rubio;s middling finish.

 

Presidential Style

 

 

 Off-the-Rack Ranking

In haute couture, OTR connotes designer styled clothing that are not tailored to the individual.

In American presidential politics, it can mean Bloomingdale, Nordstrom, and Saks, or OMG! Target.  Not always a positive connotation.

 

 

OTR

 

 

 

 Pret-a-Porter Ranking

Chris Christie leads Pret-a-Porter.  That’s right the Jersey Shore icon actually leads the category but by an incredibly small magin.

 

Pret

 

 Overall Score

Finally, the Overall Score, a composite of all of the the above.

Total Score Presidential Fashion

 

Top Words for the First 15 Years of the 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

Austin, Texas, November 7, 2015 — One hundred years ago, in the year 1915 to be precise, a number of historical trends had already been set in motion that would come to dominate the rest of the century, for better or for ill.   The Global Language Monitor, which tracks global trends though the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed a three-year study to better ascertain what trends are we now tracking that will portend future events.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.”  said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.  “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

Find the Top Words of A.D 2115, 100 Years in the Future here.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

Find the Map of the Re-Federalized US  in 2076 (and the Back Story) Here.

Re-Federated United States 2014

The results for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend  follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, C0mment, and Trend.

Top Words for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

Rank Word or Phrase Comment 21st Century Trend
1 Web/Internet (2000) Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance — also reflected in language usage Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance. Web 2.0 was the tipping point where the Internet became embedded into everyday life.
2 China (2009) 2015 is the year that China surpasses the US as the Earth’s economic engine in terms of PPE.  If China holds the title for as long as the US, it will be the year 2139 before it turns over the reigns. The Rise of China will dominate 21st century geopolitical affairs like US in the 20th
3 Selfie (2013) Evidently an ego-manical madness gripped the world in 2013-14. The more people populate the planet, the greater the focus on the individual.
4 404 (2013) The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet. 404 will not merely signify the loss of an individual connection but the shutdown of whole sectors of society
5 9/11 (2001) An inauspicious start to the 21st Century. The early 20th c. saw the seeds of Bolshevism, German Nationalism, and Fascism.  The seeds thus planted in the 21st c. are equally foreboding
6 OMG (2008) One of the first texting expressions (Oh my God!), another was BFF as in Best Friend Forever First sign that the Internet would change language. Basically the successor to Morse’s ‘What hath God Wrought?
7 Sustainable (’06) The key to ‘Green’ living where natural resources are wisely conserved and thus never depleted. Made small impact in 2006; its importance grows every year and will continue to do so as resources ARE depleted.
8 Hella (2008) An intensive in Youthspeak, generally substituting for the word ‘very’ as in ‘hella expensive’ The world is being subdivided into the various tribes of youth (Trans national to follow.)
9 N00b (2009) A beginner or ‘newbie’, with numbers (zeroes) replacing the letter Os, emphasizing a new trend in written English The Geeks will inherit the Earth
10 Futebol (2011) Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer was on display in Brasil Sports become an evermore global business
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
11 Nanobots and Grey Goo (’07) Have we already witnessed the most horrifying forms of warfare? Not if you haven’t envisioned … … self-replicating nanobots spewing forth ever mounting piles of grey goo might tend to dampen prospects for living things
12 Climate Change (’00) Near the top of word usage list since day one of the century. Focusing on data from the last hundred years actually obscures the magnitude of climate change; paleohistory suggests sea level changes of 300 feet
13  Derivative (’07) Financial instrument or analytical tool that engendered the Meltdown Intertwined global financial institutions have the ability to bring down the entire global electronic system if they falter
14 Apocalypse, Armageddon & variations thereof (2012) The word Apocalypse has been in ascendance in English for some 500 years.  However, recent years has witnessed an unprecedented resurgence Wars and rumors of war appear to be the least of it
15 Occupy (2011) ‘Occupy’ has risen to pre-eminence through Occupy Movement, the occupation of Iraq, and the so-called ‘Occupied Territories’ The gulf between the haves and have nots, the North and the South, the 1% and all the rest has only worsened through a century of unprecedented economic, scientific and social progress
16 Tsunami (2004/5) Southeast Asian Tsunami took 250,000 lives The Southeast Asian Tsunami was a thirty-foot swell that resulted in a quarter of a million deaths. Might a 300-foot rise in sea-level engender a ‘slow Tsunami with deaths in the millions?
17 Inflation (Cosmic) (2014) OK, so that the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact.  Way Cool. At the beginning of the 20th c., scientists thought our local galaxy was the entire universe; since then our view of the universe has expanded a billion billion times
18 Singularity (2015) Singularity was originally the name for Cosmic Genesis Event  (the Big Bang), Spoiler Alert:  Now used to describe when computer intelligence surpasses that of humans (Possibly before mid-century).
19 Global Warming  (2000) Rated highly from Day One of the decade The next few hundred (or few thousand) years are gong to be a longer haul than we can now imagine
20 Refugee (2005) After Katrina, refugees became evacuees After Syria, evacuees became migrants.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
21 Emoticon (2013) Words without letters conveying emotional responses, such as smileys
:-)
Emoticons. Smileys, Emoji’s  communication continues to evolve in unexpected ways
22 Emoji (2014) In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet (the alphaBIT):  Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words). The arrival of the new English Alphabet (the AlphaBIT) is apparently at hand
23 Pope Francis (2013) Also Top Name of the Year for 2013. A new type of Pontiff sets the stage for all those Popes who follow …
24 WMD (2002) Iraq’s (Non-existent) Weapons of Mass Destruction The nuclear device dropped Hiroshima weighed tons, the new backpack versions, mere pounds.
25 Telomeres (2015) Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. When telomeres wear away, the chromosomes are destroyed, and death ensues.  The goal: protect telomeres, extend life
26 German Ascendance (2015) One of the architects of the European Union, German Chancellor Angela Merkel continues her reign as the most powerful woman on the planet Germany’s tragic misadventures of the 20th c., belie its dominance of the Euro Zone in the 21st.
27 Anthropocene (2015) A proposed geologic epoch when humans began to impact natural processes An impact that will only grow for better or ill throughout the century.
28 God Particle (2011) The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues its quest for the Higgs boson, popularly known as the God Particle. Scientists have calculated a one in fifty million chance that the LHC will generate a small black hole that could devour the Earth.
29 Denier (2014) An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended). Political discourse continues to sink to unprecedented levels
30 Carbon Footprint (2008) The amount of carbon released in a process or activity Burning a gallon of petrol produces enough CO² to melt 400 gallons of ice at the poles.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
31  Slumdog (2008) Child inhabitants of Mumbai’s slums Slumdogs continue to multiply as MegaCities continue to seemingly endlessly expand
32 Truthiness (2006) Steven Colbert’s addition to the language appears to be a keeper; While something may not meet the standard of truth, it certainly appears to be true Truthiness seems to set the new standard, unfortunately
33 Change (2008) The top political buzzword of the 2008 US Presidential campaign Change will continue as a top word into the 22nd century — and beyond
34 Chinglish (2005) The Chinese-English Hybrid language growing larger as Chinese influence expands Chinese-English will inevitably cross-fertilize as the two great economic powers contend into the 22nd Century
35 Google (2007) Founders misspelled actual word ‘googol’ Is Google the prototype of the a new “Idea foundry’
36 Twitter (2009) The ability to encapsulate human thought in 140 characters The ability to encapsulate human thought in wisps of wind (or electron streams) will almost certainly follow
37 H1N1 (2009) More commonly known as Swine Flu Swine Flu, Bird Flu, Ebola, it will only get worse with the hand of man only abetting the enemy
38 Bubble (2007) One financial bubble after another as we move into the 21st century Let’s see: Communism, socialism, fascism, command economies, the silent hand of the market, China’s hybrid — evidently the business cycle will persist
39 The Great War (2014) The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed continue to ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c. As the Great War (and the ravages thereof} continue into the 21st c., what at the odds that its ramifications will continue throughout the 21st
40 Political Transparency (2007) A noble idea from the Campaign that was among the first casualties of the Obama Administration The explosion of knowledge portends less transparency not more …
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
To see the Top Words of 2014

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

30 -30 – 30

 

 

Paris Towers Over World of Fashion as Top Global Fashion Capital for 2015

The Global Language Monitor’s 11th Annual Survey

Paris nearly doubled Scores of New York and London

Where’s Milano? (No. 6)

Paris Fashion Week, Autumn 2015, New York and Austin, Texas — Paris has stunned New York City toppling it from its one year reign as the Top Global Fashion Capital in the Global Language Monitor’s 11th Annual survey.   London remained in the third spot as did L.A.at No. 4.

Rounding out the Top Ten were Rome, Milano, Barcelona, Berlin and Madrid, followed by Tokyo.  Currently, there are fifty-six fashion capitals being charted, with a number under watch for 2016.  In 2015 GLM added one city to the analysis, Washington, DC,  which made a splash, er belly flopped, to No. 53.

Le Figaro
Paris redevient la capitale mondiale de la mode

 Moving up from No.12 to No.6 word ordinarily send the City’s Fashion Establishment into an ecstatic state.  No so, if you are Milano. And especially so if you followed Roma, at No. 5.

Last March, Milano was the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2015 followed by, Suede, Booty, and Kate’s Baby Girl. However, this is a far cry from the Top Global Fashion Capital ranking, where Milano then ranked No. 12.   Much of the internet mediabuzz, not all of it positive, revolves upon these efforts to revive its ‘brand’.  Recent reports from Milano Moda Donna 2015 were mixed

Milan has been working hard to re-establish itself as the pre-eminent capital of Global Fashion, or at least to being consistently named as one of the Big Four (with Paris, New York and London).   Currently, the No. 4 spot is occupied by LA, which GLM sees as representing the Red Carpet phenomenon.

After an extraordinary two-year reign (2011-2012), London has settled into the No. 3 spot, comfortably behind Paris and New York — for the second year in a row.    London also took the third spot in all four major areas of measurement used in determining the annual rankings for the Global Language Monitor.

London Fashion Week Settles Firmly into the No. 3 Spot
.
Last year New York topped Paris by less than .05%, the tightest margin ever; this year Paris returned the favor — and then some — by nearly doubling New York’s score.  In another first, Paris topped all four categories worldwide.
“In a world torn by war, repression, and the brutal subjugation of women and girls, fashion remains a bastion of self-expression.” said Paul JJ Payack, Chief Word Analyst and president of GLM.  “And fashion can be a force for good that can be experienced in a positive manner in every culture and tradition.”
11th Annual Top Global Fashion Capitals Coming in August 2015
Sydney remains strong as Melbourne falters; for the first time New Delhi and Mumbai resulted in a virtual dead heat.
The Global Fashion Capitals for Swimwear were Miami, Barcelona, and Bali.

Barcelona, Berlin and Madrid remain hot as does what we are calling the East Asian Cluster:  Tokyo, Singapore, Shanghai and Hong Kong.  Seoul remains on the outside, very outside, of the cluster at No. 56.

 The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format: Ranking, Fashion Capital, and Previous Position.
Top Global Fashion Capitals 1 to 25
Top Global Fashion Capitals 26 to End
The Watch List for 2016 includes: Abidjan, Accra, Auckland, Beirut, Jakarta, Kuala Lampur, and Lagos.

Top Fashion Capitals by Region

Europe:
Paris, London, Rome, Milano, Barcelona, Berlin, Madrid, Florence, Monaco, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Frankfurt.
India:
Mumbai, New Delhi (statistical dead heat)
Australia:
Sydney, Melbourne
East Asia:
Tokyo, Singapore, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Seoul
RSA:
Cape Town, Johannesburg
Middle Europe:
Moscow, Prague, Vienna, St Petersburg, Warsaw and Krakow
Canada:
Toronto, Montreal,and Vancouver,
Mideast:
Dubai, Abu Dhabi
Spain:
Barcelona, Madrid
Latin America:
Sao Paulo, Rio de Janerio, Buenos Aires, Caracas, , Santiago and Mexico City
Regional US:
New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Dallas, Boston, Las Vegas, Chicago, Houston, Atlanta, San Francisco, Austin and Washington, DC
Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the eleventh edition of the survey, which was first made public in 2007.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

How to Describe the Disaster? (LOE)


How to Describe the Disaster?
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Air Date: Week of July 2, 2010
The BP oil disaster is a failure of technology and lexicology. The words that we use to describe the Gulf of Mexico disaster don’t begin to define the scope of the catastrophe. Is it a spill? A gusher? Host Jeff Young tracks the flow of words with Paul Payak from the Global Language Monitor.
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YOUNG: Millions – maybe billions – of words have been written about BP’s runaway oil well. Yet words still fail us—we still lack the right term for what’s happening in the Gulf. So we turn to Paul JJ Payack for guidance. He’s President of the Global Language Monitor in Austin, Texas, where he tracks changes in the language, including the words most often used to describe the oil in the Gulf.

PAYACK: Overwhelmingly, overwhelmingly, the top word is oil spill, which is sort of a disappointment. Many times when you have new events in a language, the language leads the event. You can actually… there are new words that pop up in profusion.

YOUNG: Uh huh.

PAYACK: And, in this case, we haven’t seen that many new words. What we’ve seen is the old way to describe an oil spill. The Exxon Valdez has a crash, spills the oil out, and that’s a spill. But this is different; this is a lot different than a spill.

YOUNG: Because a spill connotes a fixed amount that spilled from a container into where you don’t want it. That’s not what’s happening here at all.

PAYACK: In our case, we’re not talking about a spill, we’re talking about an oil field that’s estimated at 3, 4, 5 billion barrels erupting, but we still refer to it as a spill.

Read More

Making ‘One Whole’ After the Spill

The Associated Press

By Cristina Silva, Saint Petersburg Times

Lambasted by charges that his response to the gulf oil spill comes across as emotionally flat, President Barack Obama has made repeated vows to stand by the victims “until they are made whole.”

His ambitious promise now stands as the rhetoric of choice among political leaders looking to sympathize with those affected by the environmental and financial crisis. Coast Guard Rear Adm. Mary Landry and Gov. Charlie Crist have made near identical pledges and a trio of Democratic congressmen demanded oil giant BP postpone $10 billion in dividend payments to stockholders until “the people of the gulf (are) made whole.”

Problem is, what does it mean?

”That is the one question I have been asking for five weeks,” said Orange Beach Mayor Tony Kennon, who fears the sheets of oil sliding toward the shores of his Alabama tourist haven will bring new financial hardships after weeks of canceled hotel reservations and half-empty seafood shacks. “That is the one question we need to know before we can move forward.”

Politicians are well aware of the power of words.

Obama, a legal scholar with a penchant for headline-grabbing speeches, hasn’t elaborated on his definition of “made whole,” but his repetition suggests he thinks it is a good message. It means he wants to help. It means he cares. But, as with many political messages, “made whole” has more than one layer.

In legal jargon, “made whole” implies full restitution. A stolen laptop is replaced. Hospital bills are paid. A cracked windshield is repaired.

But the Gulf of Mexico crisis likely won’t be so easily resolved. Some losses could be hard to prove in court or even single out, creating a complicated web of cause and effect that might not immediately produce a culprit, said economic and legal scholars.

”What (Obama) said is true. They (BP) are going to be responsible for the damage they did,” said Fred Levin, a trial lawyer in Pensacola. “The question is, what is the damage they did?”

In other words, will those indirectly hurt by the oil spill be “made whole,” too? Or does the promise only apply to the victims who can successfully make their case in court?

Consider some potential ramifications. If affected business owners can no longer afford to send their children to private schools, should the schools file a claim? If the private schools hire fewer teachers because of declining enrollment, do the unemployed teachers get help? And if those teachers then can no longer afford to buy quality meat from the local supermarket, how does the supermarket prove its losses are tied to the oil spill?

It’s simply not clear, said Peter Henning, a former federal prosecutor who teaches criminal law at Wayne State University in Detroit.

”To the extent you are talking about just the cleanup, yes, BP is on the hook, but to the extent that you are saying we are going to return these communities to what they were, the law does not appear to extend that far,” he said. “While it is couched in legal terms, this is really more of a political promise than a legal assertion.”

Wordsmiths countered “made whole” is not an abstract concept.

”To ‘make whole’ means exactly what it says, meaning not to kind of prop you up, not to give you some aid, but to put you back precisely where you were,” said Paul JJ Payack , president of the Global Language Monitor based in Austin, Texas, which analyzes speech. “It is a very precise choice of words and they know it.”

BP so far has paid $49 million to individuals or small businesses through its claims process and sent out roughly 18,000 checks, spokesman Max McGahan said.

”We have said we will compensate individuals and businesses in full for whatever damages or loss of income has resulted from the oil spill. We have made that commitment very clearly,” McGahan said.

He declined to address the “made whole” pledge.

Read More in the St Petersburg Times

Tracking the Gulf Oil Spill Narrative


Obama vs. BP, Exxon Valdez vs. Katrina, Biblical Prophesies, etc.

The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important since he who wins control of the narrative, controls      the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill.

Austin, TX, June 02, 2010 — In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, there are now several differing story lines emerging from the Gulf Oil Spill.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and othersocial media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

The Narratives emerging from this on-going (and slow-moving) disaster include:

· Obama was Slow to Respond – 95% of the social media conversations characterize the President Obama as ‘slow to respond’.

· Obama vs. BP: who’s in charge? — 52% see BP in charge of the spill. This may or may not be a political liability. Democrats need the blame assigned to BP; at the same time, Obama needs to be seen as in overall control of the disaster.

· Worst environmental disaster ever – 42% see the current spill the worst environmental disaster ever.

· Federal Response — 57% see the Federal response using ‘poor’ or related keywords. Not a good month for the Feds; come to think of it, not a good year for the Feds.

· Katrina vs. Exxon Valdez – 61% make the comparison to the Exxon Valdez; about 39% compare the ongoing spill to the inundation of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

· Biblical Prophecies Abound Once More — About 61% of all references involve the Bible. (Even Ted Turner has a theory how the oil spill might be a warning from God.) These are markedly different in tone than those used with Katrina where the references focused on apocalyptic imagery, End-of-the-World scenarios and doom.

· The Obama Style of Leadership – This is a close one 52% see Obama as ‘hand’s on’ leadership, 48% see ‘hand’s off’. Again, this is either positive or negative depending on your political bias. Ronald Reagan was seen as a ‘hand’s off’ president and that was considered good. Jimmy Carter was a ‘hand’s on’ type president and that was considered bad.

“The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important to track since he who wins control of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “With the mid-term elections just five months away, and the prospect of the Gulf Oil Spill continuing unabated for months, control of the narrative is more important than ever.”

The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative. The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.

The term ‘narrative’ in this sense is now appearing thousands of times in the global media on the Internet and blogosphere as well as throughout the world of social media, meaning the main streams of public opinion running in the media that needs to be fed, encouraged, diverted or influenced by any means possible.

GLM recently announced The Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), in partnership with OpenConnect Systems of Dallas. The Healthcare NTI is the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time.

The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

Top Words of the Decade (2000-2009)

“Global Warming,” “9/11” and “Obama” are Top Words,

“Climate Change” is top phrase,

“Heroes” is top name

Austin, TX November 19, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has announced the Top Words of the Decade, as part of its annual global survey of the English language. The Top Words were ‘Global Warming’, 9/11, and Obama followed by Bailout, Evacuee, and Derivative; Google, Surge, Chinglish, and Tsunami followed. “Climate Change” was the top phrase, while “Heroes” was the top name; bin-Laden was No. 2.

Read the the story in the London Telegraph

“Looking at the first decade of the 21st century in words is a sober, even somber, event.” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “For a decade that began with such joy and hope, the words chosen depict a far more complicated and in many ways, tragic time. Nevertheless, signs of hope and renewal can be found in the overall lists.”

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.58 billion speakers. Since GLM’s survey encompassed the years 2000 – 2009, the expanded lists included 25 Top Words, and 20 Top Phrases and 20 Top Names.

To see the Top Words of the individual years of the 21st century, go here.

Each List contains the word, phrase or name in numerical order and the year when the word, phrase or name came to prominence. For example, the word ‘quagmire’ is hundreds of years old but it came into renewed prominence in 2004, about a year after the beginning of the Iraq War.

The Top Words of the Decade from 2000 – 2009

Word (Year) Comments

1. Global Warming (2000) Rated highly from Day One of the decade

2. 9/11 (2001) Another inauspicious start to the decade

3. Obama- (2008 )The US President’s name as a ‘root’ word or ‘word stem’

4. Bailout (2008) The Bank Bailout was but Act One of the crisis

5. Evacuee/refugee (2005) After Katrina, refugees became evacuees

6. Derivative (2007) Financial instrument or analytical tool that engendered the Meltdown

7. Google (2007) Founders misspelled actual word ‘googol’

8. Surge (2007) The strategy that effectively ended the Iraq War

9. Chinglish (2005) The Chinese-English Hybrid language growing larger as Chinese influence expands

10. Tsunami (2004) Southeast Asian Tsunami took 250,000 lives

11. H1N1 (2009) More commonly known as Swine Flu

12. Subprime ( 2007) Subprime mortgages were another bubble to burst

13. dot.com (2000) The Dot.com bubble engendered no lifelines, no bailouts

14. Y2K ( 2000) The Year 2000:  all computers would turn to pumpkins at the strike of midnight

15. Misunderestimate (2002) One of the first and most enduring of Bushisms

16. Chad ( 2000) Those Florida voter punch card fragments that the presidency would turn aupon

17. Twitter (2008 ) A quarter of a billion references on Google

18. WMD (2002) Iraq’s Weapons of Mass Destruction

19. Blog (2003) First called ‘web logs’ which contracted into blogs

20. Texting (2004) Sending 140 character text messages over cell phones

21. Slumdog (2008) Child inhabitants of Mumba’s slums

22. Sustainable (2006) The key to ‘Green’ living where natural resources are never depleted

23. Brokeback (2004)   New term for ‘gay’ from he Hollywood film ‘Brokeback Mountain’

24. Quagmire (2004) Would Iraq War end up like Vietnam, another ‘quagmire’?

25. Truthiness (2006) Steven Colbert’s addition to the language appears to be a keeper

Also worth noting:  ‘Embedded’ (2003) to embed reporters with US Troops

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The Top Phrases of the Decade from 2000 – 2009

Word (Year) Comments

1. Climate Change (2000) Green words in every form   dominant the decade

2. Financial Tsunami (2008) One quarter of the world’s wealth vanishes seemingly overnight

3. Ground Zero (2001) Site of 9/11terrorist attack in New York City

4. War on Terror (2001)  Bush administration’s response to 9/11

5. Weapons of Mass Destruction (2003)  Bush’s WMDs never found in Iraq or the Syrian desert

6. Swine Flu (2008) H1N1, please, so as not to offend the pork industry or religious sensitivities!

7. “Let’s Roll!” (2001)  Todd Beamer’s last words before Flight 93 crashed into the PA countryside

8. Red State/Blue State (2004) Republican or Democratic control of states

9. Carbon footprint (2007) How much CO² does an activity produce?

10. Shock-and-awe (2003) Initial strategy of Iraq War

11. Ponzi Scheme (2009) Madoff’s strategy reaped billions & heartache

12. Category Four (2005) Force of Hurricane Katrina hitting New Orleans’ seawalls and levies

13. King of Pop (2000)  Elvis was the King, MJ the King (of Pop)

14. “Stay the Course” (2004) Dubya’s off-stated guidance for Iraq War

15. “Yes, we can!” (2008)   Obama’s winning campaign slogan

16. “Jai Ho!” (2008)  Shout of joy from ‘Slumdog Millionaire’

17. “Out of the Mainstream” (2003) Complaint about any opposition’s political platform

18. Cloud computing (2007)  Using the Internet as a large computational device

19. Threat Fatigue (2004)   One too many terrorist threat alerts

20. Same-sex marriage (2003) Marriage of gay couples

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The Top Names of the Decade from 2000 – 2009

Name (Year) Comments

1. Heroes (2001)   Emergency responders who rushed into the Towers

2. bin Laden (2001) His Capture still top of mind for US Military

3. Ground Zero (2001) NY Times still will not capitalize the site as a formal name

4. Dubya (2000) George W. Bush, US President No. 43

5. The Clintons (Hillary & Bill) (2000) Looming on political landscape, though not as large

6. John Paul II (2000)   Largest funeral in TV history attested to power

7. Obama (2008) Making an impact as the decade ends

8. Taliban (2000)   Still the source of Afghan insurgency

9. Katrina (2004) Hurricane whose destruction of New Orleans is seared into minds around globe

10. Tiger Woods (2000) Top golfer earned about $1 Billion this decade

11. iPhone (2007)   First product on this list

12. Paul Hewson (Bono) (2000) U2 Front man, NY Times Columnist, catalyst for African relief

13. Michael Jackson (2000) The King of Pop

14. Al Gore (2000) Nobel Prize winner, US Vice President, Climate Change purveyor

15. Saddham Hussein (2000) Iraqi dictator captured while hiding in a ‘spider hole’

16. Enron (2001)   Seems like another era since this giant fell

17. Bollywood (2000)   Mumbai’s answer to Hollywood

18. Facebook (2007) Another ubiquitous software product

19. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (2005) Iranian president since 2005

20. Vladimir Putin (2000) Russian leader since 2000

Also worth noting:  ’Wikipedia’ (2006) The user-generated compendium of all knowledge

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The analysis was completed on November 16th using GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI), the proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the media and on the Internet, now including blogs and social media (such as Twitter). The words are tracked in relation to frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, factoring in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum and velocity.