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Microaggression is Top Word, Trump the Top Name, Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase for Worldwide English for 2015

Documenting the year 2015 through English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 16th Annual Survey of Global English

here

Top Words Pic 2015

AUSTIN, Texas,  December 28, 2015  — Microaggression is the Top Word, Donald J. Trump the Top Name, and Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase, of 2015.  This is the 16th Annual survey of the English language by the Global Language Monitor.

Microaggression is an academic term, related to the ‘white privilege’ movement that has moved into widespread circulation over the last generation. Donald J Trump is the US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing thr rules of American political decorum.  Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
In 2014 the heart emoji was named the Top Word, the first time any emoji captured any Word of the Year honors.  The Oxford Dictionaries followed in 2015 by  naming the ‘laughing until tears of joy’ emoji as it top word of 2015, though there is scant evidence that any place on the planet was so afflicted.
“The English language continues its ever deeper penetration into global consciousness.  Some are wary of the consequences of a single language (of the 7,000 extant human tongues) dominating the Linguasphere.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “The English Language is continuing a remarkable transformation driven by new word formations not witnessed since the Bard created nearly 2000 new words during his lifetime (1564-1616). However, this time the words are bubbling up from the entire planetary linguasphere”.
GLM’s top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.

The Top Words of 2015 follow.

Rank / Word / Comments

  1. Microaggression — The brief, everyday exchanges that send mostly unintended  derogatory  messages to members of various minority groups. Related to the following terms:
    1. Safe Space — In universities protecting students feelings by warnng of subject matter that might elicit discomfit or distress.
    2. Trigger — Any action that might elicit feelings of discomfit or distress.
    3. Unsafe — The feelings a student encounters when without warning they are confronted with subject matter or situations that have elicited feelings of discomfit or distress.
    4. Snowflake — What unconcerned students call those with the need for safe spaces and warnings about possible trigger events.
    5. White Privilege — Societal privileges that benefit people identified as white in Western countries, beyond what is commonly experienced by non-white people under the same social, political, or economic circumstances.
  2. Climate Changing —  GLM will now use the the gerund form of the verb ‘change’  to recogize the fact of on-going, continuous change in the Earth’s Climate. Related terms:
    1. Anthropocene — the current geological age, viewed as the period during in which human activity has been a significant influence on climate and the environment;
    2. Anthropogenic — used to describe the effect of humans on the climate and the environment
  3. Refugee — A term used to describe migrants that were forced from their homeland by war or civil unrest.
  4. Migrant — A term that includes refugees from economic, climatalogical changes, and others issues not directly related to war.
  5. Thug — Brought to renewed attention by President Obama; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
  6. Trans — Abbreviation for transgender, people who identify with the opposite of their physical characteristics.
  7. Content —  The Top Business Buzzword of 2015
  8. Afluenza — A theoretical malaise affecting wealthy young people, symptoms of which include a lack of motivation, feelings of guilt, and a sense of isolation.
  9. Opioids — In the US, opioid painkillers and heroin are responible for as more deaths than from automobiles and gun violence combined.
  10. Evolve — The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in political jargon.  More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it only occurs until the voters first shift their views ona particular subject.
OK is the most understood word of Global English in the world, again.  See more.

The Top Names of 2015

Rank /Name / Comments

  1. Donald J. Tump — The US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing the rules of American political decorum
  2. Alan Kurdi — The Syrian three-year-old whose dead body washed ashore in Bodrum, Turkey, the photo of which caused global outrage.
  3. Pope Francis —  The most highly cited name, again.
  4. Xi Jinping — “Steady as she goes,” as his term proceeds as China’s paramount leader.
  5. Middle East Terrorists — Exporting death squads into the West with impunity.
  6. Putin — Short of stature, long on action.
  7. Angela Merkel — Under Merkel, Germany has accomlished its erstwhile goal of dominating Europe.
  8. Falcon 9 — The safe landing of  its initial stage has been described as marking a historic step in the history of Humanity
  9. El Nino — Already there is 5x the normal snowpack in the Sierra.
  10. Princess Charlotte of Cambridge.  10-a.  HRH Georgie — Nickname of Prince George of Cambridge, son of ‘Wills and Kate.
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The Top Phrases of 2015

Rank / Phrase / Comment

  1. Migrant Crisis — Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
  2. Je Suis Charlie — Representing the universal outcry against terrorist violence, such as witnessed most recently in San Bernardino.
  3. Almond Shaming — Forty gallons of water to grow a single almond?
  4. Nation State — The migrant Crisis in Europe and the Middle East are examples of trans-national crises that transcend the idea of the Nation State.  (The Nation State arose in the late 15th century with the rise of capitalism, geography, and cartography.
  5. Rogue nukes — Despite the new treaty, the fact reains that Iran can now assemble a bomb in a fortnight.  
  6. Anatomically Modern Human — A class of homonids that lived as recently as 12,000 years ago.
  7. Beast Mode — Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch (American football).
  8. End of World Scenarios — A switch from previous years where clarion calls are being issued by the likes of Steven Hawking and other scientists.
  9. Digital Darkness — What happens if we can no longer access digital information? A distinct possibility at some future point.  Unsolicited Advice:  Keep hard copies of beloved photos.
  10. Evolve — The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in political jargon. More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it never occurs until the voters first shift their position.
  11. Two Child Policy — To the relief of much of the world, China officially relaxed its One-Child Policy.

 

Methodology:  GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria:  1)  found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular professional or social group or geography.  The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 275,000 print and electronic global media (not limited to the English-language-based media), as well as new social media sources as they emerge.
The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century 
2014:
Top Words:  No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) , No. 2 Hashtag , No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases:   No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot;  No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names:   No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War I

2013:
Top Words: No. 1  ‘404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:

Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:

Top Word: Misunderestimate

Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture.  GLM  analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.  The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.


Top Words for the First 15 Years of the 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

 

Austin, Texas, November 7, 2015 — One hundred years ago, in the year 1915 to be precise, a number of historical trends had already been set in motion that would come to dominate the rest of the century, for better or for ill.   The Global Language Monitor, which tracks global trends though the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed a three-year study to better ascertain what trends are we now tracking that will portend future events.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

 The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.”  said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.  “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

Find the Top Words of A.D 2115, 100 Years in the Future here.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

Find the Map of the Re-Federalized US  in 2076 (and the Back Story) Here.

Re-Federated United States 2014

The results for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend  follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, C0mment, and Trend.

Top Words for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

Rank Word or Phrase Comment 21st Century Trend
1 Web/Internet (2000) Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance — also reflected in language usage Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance. Web 2.0 was the tipping point where the Internet became embedded into everyday life.
2 China (2009) 2015 is the year that China surpasses the US as the Earth’s economic engine in terms of PPE.  If China holds the title for as long as the US, it will be the year 2139 before it turns over the reigns. The Rise of China will dominate 21st century geopolitical affairs like US in the 20th
3 Selfie (2013) Evidently an ego-manical madness gripped the world in 2013-14. The more people populate the planet, the greater the focus on the individual.
4 404 (2013) The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet. 404 will not merely signify the loss of an individual connection but the shutdown of whole sectors of society
5 9/11 (2001) An inauspicious start to the 21st Century. The early 20th c. saw the seeds of Bolshevism, German Nationalism, and Fascism.  The seeds thus planted in the 21st c. are equally foreboding
6 OMG (2008) One of the first texting expressions (Oh my God!), another was BFF as in Best Friend Forever First sign that the Internet would change language. Basically the successor to Morse’s ‘What hath God Wrought?
7 Sustainable (’06) The key to ‘Green’ living where natural resources are wisely conserved and thus never depleted. Made small impact in 2006; its importance grows every year and will continue to do so as resources ARE depleted.
8 Hella (2008) An intensive in Youthspeak, generally substituting for the word ‘very’ as in ‘hella expensive’ The world is being subdivided into the various tribes of youth (Trans national to follow.)
9 N00b (2009) A beginner or ‘newbie’, with numbers (zeroes) replacing the letter Os, emphasizing a new trend in written English The Geeks will inherit the Earth
10 Futebol (2011) Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer was on display in Brasil Sports become an evermore global business
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
11 Nanobots and Grey Goo (’07) Have we already witnessed the most horrifying forms of warfare? Not if you haven’t envisioned … … self-replicating nanobots spewing forth ever mounting piles of grey goo might tend to dampen prospects for living things
12 Climate Change (’00) Near the top of word usage list since day one of the century. Focusing on data from the last hundred years actually obscures the magnitude of climate change; paleohistory suggests sea level changes of 300 feet
13  Derivative (’07) Financial instrument or analytical tool that engendered the Meltdown Intertwined global financial institutions have the ability to bring down the entire global electronic system if they falter
14 Apocalypse, Armageddon & variations thereof (2012) The word Apocalypse has been in ascendance in English for some 500 years.  However, recent years has witnessed an unprecedented resurgence Wars and rumors of war appear to be the least of it
15 Occupy (2011) ‘Occupy’ has risen to pre-eminence through Occupy Movement, the occupation of Iraq, and the so-called ‘Occupied Territories’ The gulf between the haves and have nots, the North and the South, the 1% and all the rest has only worsened through a century of unprecedented economic, scientific and social progress
16 Tsunami (2004/5) Southeast Asian Tsunami took 250,000 lives The Southeast Asian Tsunami was a thirty-foot swell that resulted in a quarter of a million deaths. Might a 300-foot rise in sea-level engender a ‘slow Tsunami with deaths in the millions?
17 Inflation (Cosmic) (2014) OK, so that the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact.  Way Cool. At the beginning of the 20th c., scientists thought our local galaxy was the entire universe; since then our view of the universe has expanded a billion billion times
18 Singularity (2015) Singularity was originally the name for Cosmic Genesis Event  (the Big Bang), Spoiler Alert:  Now used to describe when computer intelligence surpasses that of humans (Possibly before mid-century).
19 Global Warming  (2000) Rated highly from Day One of the decade The next few hundred (or few thousand) years are gong to be a longer haul than we can now imagine
20 Refugee (2005) After Katrina, refugees became evacuees After Syria, evacuees became migrants.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
21 Emoticon (2013) Words without letters conveying emotional responses, such as smileys :-) Emoticons. Smileys, Emoji’s  communication continues to evolve in unexpected ways
22 Emoji (2014) In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet (the alphaBIT):  Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words). The arrival of the new English Alphabet (the AlphaBIT) is apparently at hand
23 Pope Francis (2013) Also Top Name of the Year for 2013. A new type of Pontiff sets the stage for all those Popes who follow …
24 WMD (2002) Iraq’s (Non-existent) Weapons of Mass Destruction The nuclear device dropped Hiroshima weighed tons, the new backpack versions, mere pounds.
25 Telomeres (2015) Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. When telomeres wear away, the chromosomes are destroyed, and death ensues.  The goal: protect telomeres, extend life
26 German Ascendance (2015) One of the architects of the European Union, German Chancellor Angela Merkel continues her reign as the most powerful woman on the planet Germany’s tragic misadventures of the 20th c., belie its dominance of the Euro Zone in the 21st.
27 Anthropocene (2015) A proposed geologic epoch when humans began to impact natural processes An impact that will only grow for better or ill throughout the century.
28 God Particle (2011) The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues its quest for the Higgs boson, popularly known as the God Particle. Scientists have calculated a one in fifty million chance that the LHC will generate a small black hole that could devour the Earth.
29 Denier (2014) An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended). Political discourse continues to sink to unprecedented levels
30 Carbon Footprint (2008) The amount of carbon released in a process or activity Burning a gallon of petrol produces enough CO² to melt 400 gallons of ice at the poles.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
31  Slumdog (2008) Child inhabitants of Mumbai’s slums Slumdogs continue to multiply as MegaCities continue to seemingly endlessly expand
32 Truthiness (2006) Steven Colbert’s addition to the language appears to be a keeper; While something may not meet the standard of truth, it certainly appears to be true Truthiness seems to set the new standard, unfortunately
33 Change (2008) The top political buzzword of the 2008 US Presidential campaign Change will continue as a top word into the 22nd century — and beyond
34 Chinglish (2005) The Chinese-English Hybrid language growing larger as Chinese influence expands Chinese-English will inevitably cross-fertilize as the two great economic powers contend into the 22nd Century
35 Google (2007) Founders misspelled actual word ‘googol’ Is Google the prototype of the a new “Idea foundry’
36 Twitter (2009) The ability to encapsulate human thought in 140 characters The ability to encapsulate human thought in wisps of wind (or electron streams) will almost certainly follow
37 H1N1 (2009) More commonly known as Swine Flu Swine Flu, Bird Flu, Ebola, it will only get worse with the hand of man only abetting the enemy
38 Bubble (2007) One financial bubble after another as we move into the 21st century Let’s see: Communism, socialism, fascism, command economies, the silent hand of the market, China’s hybrid — evidently the business cycle will persist
39 The Great War (2014) The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed continue to ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c. As the Great War (and the ravages thereof} continue into the 21st c., what at the odds that its ramifications will continue throughout the 21st
40 Political Transparency (2007) A noble idea from the Campaign that was among the first casualties of the Obama Administration The explosion of knowledge portends less transparency not more …
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
To see the Top Words of 2014

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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The Top Words of the Year A.D. 2115, a Hundred Years Hence

Attention:  Embargoed until Tuesday, November 3, 2115.  Call for exceptions. info@LanguageMonitor.com or 001 512 815 8836
 Austin, Texas Federation, November 3, 2115 — The Galactic Language Monitor  (GLM), which tracks global trends though the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed its 112th annual global survey.
The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 3.83 billion speakers (January 2113 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

 The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

The words 2115 came from six continents, and Earth Outposts on the Chinese Moon base, the US station on Mars, and the Titan and Ganymede field stations.  The Joint Interstellar Mission are in the deep space silence period.

The results follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, and Comment.

1 RFUS Since the Great Re-federalization of the 2060s into 14 Federations (hence the new name).
2 Extinction The fourth Global extinction has been declared over, with species apparently stabilization, a loss of some 400,000 species since the beginning of the 21st Century.
3 Global Warming/Climate Change Common sense actually takes hold after the atmospheric temperature chart of the last 400,000 years and the land chart of 25,000-15,000 BCE (when the seas were some 300 feet lower as evidenced by the Bering Land Bridge) are accepted as the basis of discussion.
5 Pope Francis V After the relatively short reign of Pope Francis I, the following four pontiffs, attempt to recapture the ‘magic’.
Doomsday Asteroid  Extra attention since Rogue 23 struck Inavit in 2087.
6 JNZE Contention over the Jerusalem Neutral Zone Enclave continues; however all religions still enjoy freedom of worship.
7 Nuclear Proliferation Spread of weapons beyond the Nuclear 10 continues (current Nuclear 10:  US, UK, France, China, Russia, India, Pakistan, Israel, Iran, and Saudi Arabia).(North Korea was disarmed in 2039).
8 Same-old, Same old Phrase is popularized after US Presidential Election seems to be shaping up as Paul Walker Bush vs. Joseph James Obama for 2116 (after Joseph P. Kennedy IV and William Rodman “Bill” Clinton III withdrew.)
9 China Unbound China’s economy has stabilized after its economy resumed robust growth after several decades of stagnation.   There is talk of it replacing the US Federation as the largest world economy, again.
10 Supervolcano  After the close call with the Yellowstone Cauldron where only 1.3M died, the nations of the world begin take necessary actions.
11 Polar Vortex Since the first Internet-age struck in 2014, the phenomenon has been repeated dozens of times around the world.
12 Scots Style A new term introduced after Free Scotland asks to join the RFUS after being shunned by England for most of the 21st century.
13 World War I World War I is finally after it lasting reverberations disappear at the 200 year mark.
14 524 Million Total body count from the hemorrhagic fever outbreaks early in the century are now approaching 524 million persons.  The WHO estimates that they are confident it will be in control in the next 6 months or so.
15 Sykes-Picot Lines The “lines in the sand” are still raising havoc after 200 years
Copyright ©2115 Galactic Language Monitor

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.​
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Map of the Re-Federalised United States, AD 2076

The Back Story to The Re-Federalised United States (RFUS) in AD 2076

Attention:  Embargoed until Tuesday, November 3, 2115.  Call for exceptions. info@LanguageMonitor.com or 001 512 815 8836
Austin, Texas Federation, November  3, 2115 — As a public service GLM (Galactic Language Monitor, nee the Global Language Monitot) provides this overview on the birth of the Re-Federalised United States.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

 The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.”  said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.  “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

Find the Top Words of A.D 2115, 100 Years in the Future here.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

The ‘Re-Federalists’ convinced the majority of the US electorate to call a Constitutional Convention after decades of  hat came to be called ‘the Great Gridlock’.
In the aftermath, the US was ‘re-federalised’ into fourteen ‘Federations,’ the former District was made into a politics-free ‘National Monument’.
and the federal government moved into the range of Thomas Jefferson’s early estimates (extrapolated from thirty or forty into some 300,000 employees), who were equally divided among the Fourteen Federations.
The new federations were more politically, culturally and economically united, so the so-called “culture wars” of the 21st C. quickly faded away. Another interesting note:  VanCity of British Columbia, and ScotsLand, of the former United Kingdom were both annexed by the RFUS, without apparent opposition.
This also lit the economic engines of most of the new states, the the US Federation jumped into a sizable lead economically over China,
again.  However, China re-captured its lead as the world’s top economy later in the 21st c. and into the 22nd.
Re-Federated United States 2014

About the Galactic Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 



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Farewell to David Letterman!

Top Ten Words of 2010 on Letterman

Over the years the Global Language Monitor and David Letterman have crossed paths a number of times.  This Top Ten List send-up remains among our favorites!


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The Top Trending Words of 2015: ‘Beast Mode’, ‘for convenience’, & ‘Thugs’

Princess Charlotte is already Top Name

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,080,646.4 (May 8, 2015 estimate)

 

AUSTIN, Texas May 8, 2015 –  Beast Mode, ‘for convenience’, and Thugs lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2015, followed by Deflate Gate, and  Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor, the big data, trend tracking consultancy.   This is preliminary to GLM’s thirteenth annual Word of the Year (#WOTY) rankings that will be released at year-end.

“By the fifteenth year of the 20th century, the world was already awash in the trends that would influence the rest of the century, reaching all the way into the early 21st century.” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “The twenty-first century trends that accompany these words might similarly portend far greater events than we can ever imagine today.”

The Top Trending Words of 2015 are listed below  (Rank, Word, and Comment). 

 

Top Trending Words for 2015

Rank Word Commentary
1 Beast Mode Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch os the Seattle Seahawks (American football}.
2 For convenience Hillary Clinton’s explanation on why she used a private email address for State Department business.
3 Thugs President used ‘thugs’ to describe Baltimore rioters; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
4 Deflate Gate Pushing the rules to the limit, as in deflating the football to give an advantage to the home team.
5 Princess Charlotte Pound-for-pound, the biggest media sensation since the Kardashians broke the Internet.
6 Deep learning Techniques used to get machines closer to intelligence, artirfical or otherwise.
7 Anthropocene A proposed geologic epoch acknowledging humans influence upon the Earth.
8 Drone (as a verb) As in, ‘the enemy located, identified, and droned’.
9 Digital Darkness What happens if we can no longer access digital information?  A distinct possibility at some future point.
10 Invisible Primaries Follow the money, that also seems to work …
11 Near-Nude Have you noticed the exposure on the runways and red carpets lately?
12 Migrant-electorate (from the UK) New migrant electorate numbering some 4 million non-Brits in the UK.
13 Evolve The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in US Political jargon.  More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it never occurs until the voters first shift their position.
14 Intelligence Explosion Even France is loosening up regulations in this regard.
15 Almond Shaming Among the most visible water hogs of curent California drought, now entering its fourth year.
Copyright ©2015 The Global Language Monitor

Others under consideration:  Billanthropy, #BLM, and Snowpochalypse (again)  A number of trending words did not yet meet the triple threshold  test, but might qualify as the year further unfolds.

In December 2014, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Smiley Emoji was the Global English Word of the Year for 2014.

To see the Top Words of 2014, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) is Top Word, Pope Francis topped by Ebola as Top Name, “Hands Up, No Shoot” is Top Phrase

Pope Francis Topped by Ebola for Top Name of 2014 (see below)

“Hands Up, No Shoot” is the Top Phrase of the Year of 2014 (see below)

 

Emoji Hearts and Smily face

Documenting the year 2014 through English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 15th Annual Survey of Global English

 AUSTIN, Texas,  December 2014  — The Emoji  ideograph for Heart (and Love)  is the Top Word for 2014 according to the 15th Annual survey of the English language by the the Global Language Monitor.  The Heart and Love emoji, emoticon, and variations thereof appear billions of times a day around the world — across languages and cultures.  This is the first time an ideograph has captured Word of the Year honors.
The GLM Word, Phrase, and Names of the Year lists are intended to provide a history of each year since 2000 through English-language word usage.

” Each emoji represents an emotion, expression, or state of mind, or a person, place or thing, so much so, that we see the birth of the AlphaBorg or AlphaBit.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

NY Times Logo Large
Click here for an Emoji Test Yourself

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/test-yourself-emoji/

“The English Language is now undergoing a remarkable transformation unlike any in its 1400 year history —  its system of writing, the Alphabet, is gaining characters at amazing rate.  These character are ideographs or pictographs that are called emoji and emoticons.   There are about a thousand emoji characters now officially recognized by Unicode Consortium, the official keepers of coding that forms the basis of the Internet.  They regularly review new suggestions with the next 37 or so being finalized for June 2015.  Then the new emoji can be embedded in any number of devices for any number of languages.

“The AlphaBIT now includes letters, numbers, the diacritical marks that compose emoticons, as well as clever electronic solutions that provide real-time access to more than hundreds of emoji.”

GLM’s top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.

Example of Emoji Keyboard

The figure below shows an Emoji keyboard for Apple.  When you select the Emoji keyboard, you will see a new key on the bottom row, which looks like an stylized globe.

Emoji-Keyboard

You click this key to access a number of emoji ideographic menus for differing classes of  emoji.  In this way the key doesn’t present a single letter, number, or diacritical mark but rather access to hundreds or thousands of emoji.

The following figures show the Top 7 Emojis on a specialized Twitter feed for 24 hours back in June 2014.  Fourteen of the Top 100 were heart-based.

Top 7 Emoji with Numbers

At last count there are now some 722 characters, with another 250 being made available during the next year, and 37 more due for approval in June 2015.

The Top Words of 2014 follow.

Rank / Word / Comments

  1. The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) —  The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) is the Top Word of 2014.  Each emoji represents an emotion, expression, or state of mind, or a person, place or thing.
  2. Hashtag  — The re-invented pound-sign becomes evermore powerful.
  3. Vape  — Smoking an electronic or e-cigarette, shorthand for vaporize, or vaping.  Vapers are banned from indoor vaping in New York and other locales.
  4. Blood Moon — Four total eclipses of the moon in eighteen-month span.  Some Christians see it as the presaging a “lunar apocalypse”.
  5. Nano — From Greek for dwarf, small; now 1 billionth of a meter, and any number of words surrounding nano technology.
  6. Photo Bomb — Breaking into a ‘pre-arranged” photograph without authorization resulting in often humorous outcomes.  
  7. Caliphate — Literally, a land ruled by an Islamic Caliph typically governed under Sharia Law.
  8. (White) privilege — The alleged advantages of having lighter colored skin in a diverse society.
  9. Bae — Term of endearment for one’s object of desire.
  10. “Bash” Tag — Using a hashtag to undermine your frenemies.
  11. Transparency —  That state of government openness that is apparently unachievable in the Western World.
  12. Sustainable — The Jimmy Carter of words; keeps getting stronger since it was WOTY  in 2006.
  13. Clickbait — A link  you just have to click on, though its more of a paid-for bait-and-switch.
  14. Quindecennial  —  Fifteen year anniversary; 2014 is the quindecinnal of the 21st century.
  15. Comet — Comet 67p has a visitor from the Rosetta Spacecraft.
OK is most understood word in the world, again.  See more.
.

The Top Phrases of 2014

Rank / Phrase / Comment

  1. Hands Up, Don’t Shoot — Demonstrators’ continued chant after shooting of unarmed suspect in Ferguson, Missouri.
  2. Cosmic Inflation — The explosive growth of the Universe from virtually nothing.  OK, there was something nowadays called the Singularity, sized about a billionth of a billionth of an inch.  More evidence emerges that the Big Bang is settled science.
  3. Global Warming — The past is prologue here. 15,000 years ago New York City was buried under 5,000 meters of ice.
  4. Climate Change – Add ‘anthropogenic’ warming to this fact:  the existence of  the Bering Land Bridge 20,000 years ago suggests that the Oceans were some 100 meters lower than today. (That’s about a football field.)
  5. War on Women — In the Islamic state, women and young girls (10 and older) are stolen and then sold into sexual slavery or forced into involuntary marriages. And this after watching the beheading of their husbands, sons and brothers.
  6. All Time High — Many see this all-too-prevalent description of many world markets as more of a warning that a cause for celebration.
  7. Rogue nukes — Sources state that Iran can now assemble a bomb in two weeks.  This is going from hypothetical to reality.  (If true, International Inspection Effort:  Fail.)
  8. Near-Earth Asteroid —  Admittedly more of a space rock than an asteroid but it did create significant property damage as well as injuries before crashing into a Russian lake.
  9. Big Data  — No 1 on the current High Tech Buzzword list, ushering in a global transformation in how data is processed, analyzed, and transformed into solutions.
  10. Polar Vector — An unusually long-lived Polar Outbreak plunging deep in the Southern territories.

 .

The Top Names of 2014 

Rank /Name / Comments

  1. Ebola — The Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a highly contagious, often fatal, hemorrhagic  disease.  The current outbreak started in West Africa earlier this year and has claimed some 5,000 lives as of this writing.
  2. Pope Francis —  The most highly cited name, again.  The  former Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church, born December 17, 1936 in Buenos Aires.
  3. World War One — A conflict from the early 20th century that many historians are beginning to understand as incomplete.
  4. Médecins Sans Frontières — Doctors Without Borders, is a Nobel Peace Prize winning NGO founded in 1971.  Heroically, involved in current Ebola epidemic.
  5. MH370 — Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that disappeared on Saturday, 8 March 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, with 239 passengers and crew.
  6. FIFA World Cup —  Better known simply as the World Cup, in 2014 won by Germany over Argentina (and heavily favored Brasil).
  7. Ice Bucket Challenge —  A popular charity-based fund-raising activity to generate funds for ALS.  The stunt involves pouring buckets of water and ice over the heads of the participants.
  8. Crimea — Reminder to Mr. Putin and the history-conscious (and poetically inclined):  The Charge of the Light Brigade did not end well.
  9. The Mid-terms — The US national election held during non-Presidential election years, hence the name, Mid-term.
  10. NSA — The National Security Agency of the US collects intelligence through clandestine means of both foreign and (to the surprise of many) domestic sources.
  11. Prince George of Cambridge.  5a.  HRH Georgie — Nickname of Prince George of Cambridge, son of ‘Wills and Kate.”  Watch this space as a ‘sister?’ enters the family.
  12. Malala Yousafzai  — Two years ago named co-name of the Year by GLM,  this year the co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.The Pakistani girl shot by terrorists for promoting the right to education for  girls.
  13. Xi Jinping — “Steady as she goes,” as his term proceeds as China’s paramount leader. 
  14. President Obama – ‘Hope and Change’ retreats even  further into history as Obama’s second term troubles mount.
  15. Sochi Olympics — The XXII Olympic Winter Games that took place 7 to 23 February 2014, in Sochi, Russia.

Methodology:  GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria:  1)  found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular professional or social group or geography.  The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 275,000 print and electronic global media (not limited to the English-language-based media), as well as new social media sources as they emerge.
The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century 

2013:
Top Words: No. 1  ‘404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:

Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:

Top Word: Misunderestimate

Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture.  GLM  analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.  The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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The Various Global Language Monitor Word of the Year Schedules

GLM Words of the Year Schedules

No. 1, Words, Names and Phrases of 2014 will be announced during the US Thanksgiving Week, Tuesday November 25

No. 2, Top Business Buzzwords (50) will be announced in early December.

No.3, Top Words of the Quindecennial of the 21st century will be announced in mid-December.

No. 4, Top Words, One Hundred Years Hence & Map of the Re-federalized United States for 2114 A.D. later in December.

Words of the Year Already Announced:

 

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,027,770.5 (July 1, 2014 estimate)


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“All Things New York City” are the Top Fashion Buzzwords of 2014

The ​Seventh Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

 

NEW YORK, September 12, 2014 –​ “All things New York” has been named the Top Fashion Buzzword for 201​4, in the Global Language Monitor’s ​seventh annual ranking.  Attitude, Reds, Underbut(t) and Visible Panty Lines (VPL) follow.  Boyfriend Jeans,  Side Boobs, The Kardashian Clan, Robe-style Coats, and Pastels follow.

 

On the runway NYT Logo
Read Vanessa Friedman’s Take on the Rivalry

 

All Things New York”, capturing the essence of the New York fashion sense, dominates the 2014 Top Fashion Buzzword list,” said Rebecca Roman, Manhattan-based Fashion Director for GLM. “It is difficult to think of any global fashion trend that does not have a strong presence, if not its origin,  in the New York City.

For the current list of the Top 50 Fashion Capitals Go here

The Top Fashion Buzzwords of 2014 follow:

Rank, Buzzword, Comment

  1. “All things New York” — In 2014 New York stands astride the world of fashion.
  2. Attitude — It’s not just what you wear but how you wear it.
  3. Reds — Big , bold, and bright.
  4. Underbut(t) — Yes, we said ‘underbut(t).
  5. VPL (Visible Panty Lines) — For decades, the idea was to eliminate VPL; VPLs are now in style.
  6. Boyfriend Jeans — Popular but not always fashionable.
  7. Side Boobs — Same as above.
  8. The Kardashian Clan — Same as above.
  9. Robe-style Coats — More bedroom-style in the streets.
  10. Pastels — Appropriate now for all seasons.
  11. Funky Eye Makeup — You know it when you see it.
  12. Earthy Tones — Mixing various earth tones together.
  13. Sneakers — Still popular in all shapes and sizes.
  14. Transparents — Updated Peek-a-boo look.
  15. Sweaters — Particularly Wool, particularly big.

Methodology:  GLM’s various word analyses are longitudinal in nature covering a number of years that varies with the particular analysis.  The rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  GLM analyses billions of web pages, millions of blogs, 300,000 print and electronic news organizations, and new social media sites as they emerge.  To qualify for GLM’s lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Top Fashion Buzzwords of previous years include:

  • London (2013)
  • the Princess Effect (2012)
  • Kate Middleton (2011)
  • Lady Gaga (2010), and
  • Chiconomics (2009)

 Each year, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Global Fashion Capitals. In ​ 2013 New York topped Paris and London followed by Los Angeles (!?), Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.

About the Global Language Monitor
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.
Today, from its home in Austin, Texas Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.



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