University Rankings – April 2009

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

Harvard Nips Columbia, Chicago, Michigan, Stanford follow,

Wisconsin, Cornell, Princeton, Yale, and Berkeley in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 9, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about what GLM’s College Reputation Management Services can do for your school

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.   Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.


Universities — Spring  2009 Rank 1

Harvard University, MA

2

Columbia University, NY

3

University of Chicago, IL

4 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, MI 5

Stanford University, CA

6 University of Wisconsin—Madison , WI 7

Cornell University, NY

8

Princeton University, NJ

9

Yale University, CT

10 University of California—Berkeley, CA 11 University of Pennsylvania, PA 12 University of Washington, WA 13 University of California—Los Angeles, CA 14

Johns Hopkins University, MD

15

Duke University, NC

16 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 17 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill, NC 18

New York University

19

U. of California-San Diego

20

U. of California-Davis

21

Boston University, MA

22 Ohio State University—Columbus, OH 23

California Institute of Technology CA

24

Northwestern University, IL

25

University of Texas-Austin, TX

26

University of Florida.FL

27

Boston College, MA

28

University of Virginia, VA

29

Purdue University, IN

30 University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign, IL 31

University of Southern California, CA

32

U. of California-Santa Barbara, CA

33

Georgia Institute of Technology, GA

34

University of Georgia, GA

35

Georgetown University, DC

36

Rutgers University, NJ

37

Pennsylvania State University, PA

38

Syracuse University, NY

39

Vanderbilt University, TN

40

Emory University, GA

41

Texas A&M University, TX

42

Carnegie Mellon University, PA

43

U. of California, Irvine, CA

44

Washington University in St. Louis, MO

45

Case Western Reserve, OH

46

Tufts University, MA

47

University of Notre Dame, IN

48

Dartmouth College, NH

49 Villanova University, PA 50 College of William and Mary, VA

.

.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.  To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page



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University Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top Colleges Rankings, click here.

Media Momentum

CalTech nips Emory, Boston College, Georgia Tech and Tufts follow

Southern Cal, Rice, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Brandeis in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 7, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Momentum

University

Overall

1.

CalTech

22

2.

Emory University, GA

39

3.

Boston College, MA

26

4.

GeorgiaTech

32

5.

Tufts University, MA

45

6.

U. of Southern California

30

7.

Rice University, TX

48

8.

Georgetown University, DC

34

9.

Vanderbilt University, TN

38

10.

Brandeis University, MA

54

11.

Wake Forest, NC

52

12.

Syracuse University, NY

37

13.

Northwestern, IL

23

14.

Dartmouth College, NH

47

15.

Notre Dame, IN

46

16.

Tulane University, LA

51

17.

Auburn University, AL

50

18.

Case Western Reserve, OH

44

19,

Rensselaer (RPI), NY

57

20.

U. of Texas—Austin

24

21.

California—Santa Barbara

31

22.

Baylor University, TX

55

23.

Carnegie Mellon, PA

41

24.

Washington U., MO

42

25.

Texas A&M University

40

26.

University of Georgia

33

27.

Lehigh University , PA

58

28.

Boston University, MA

20

29.

Villanova University, PA

60

30.

William and Mary, VA

59

31.

Princeton University, NJ

8

32.

University of MN

60

33.

Purdue University, IN

28

34.

U. of California, Irvine

60

35.

U. of  Wisconsin—Madison

6

36.

New York University

18

37.

MIT

16

38.

University of Virginia

27

39,

PennState

36

40.

University of Florida

25

41.

Columbia University, NY

2

42.

University of Washington

12

43.

Ohio State University

13

44.

U. of  California—Irvine

43

45.

U. of Pennsylvania

11

46.

Stanford University, CA

5

47.

Rutgers University, NJ

35

48.

Yale University, CT

9

49.

U. of California—Davis

60

50.

U. of North Carolina

17

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.



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College Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum

Rank

Overall

1

Bard College, NY

10

2

Colorado College, CO

1

3

Harvey Mudd College, CA

45

4

Wesleyan University, CT

37

5

St Olaf College, MN

40

6

Grinnell College, IA

29

7

Holy Cross, MA

38

8

Gettysburg College, PA

39

9

Claremont McKenna, CA

43

10

St Lawrence, NY

47

11

Drew University, NJ

33

12

Occidental College, CA

28

13

Davidson College, NC

25

14

Southwestern U., TX

48

15

Skidmore College, NY

41

16

U. of Richmond, VA

7

17

Middlebury College, VT

6

18

Furman University, SC

42

19

Trinity College, CT

22

20

Macalester College, MN

54

21

Reed College, OR

34

22

Amherst College, MA

3

23

Connecticut College, CT

26

24

Whitman College, WA

44

25

Wellesley College, MA

4

26

Colgate University, NY

17

27

DePauw University, IN

35

28

Centre College, KY

46

29

Lafayette College, PA

19

30

Colby College, ME

27

31

Pomona College, CA

28

32

Scripps College, CA

50

33

Barnard College, NY

18

34

Kenyon College, OH

31

35

Swarthmore College, PA

13

36

Bucknell University, PA

12

37

Haverford College, PA

30

38

Bates College, ME

32

39

Hamilton College, NY

15

40

Dickinson College, PA

23

54

Mount Holyoke, MA

20

41

Union College, NY

8

42

Washington & Lee, PA

36

43

Smith College, MA

14

44

Williams College, MA

2

45

Oberlin College, OH

5

46

Bryn Mawr College, PA

16

47

Vassar College, NY

9

48

Franklin & Marshall, PA

49

49

Carleton College, MN

24

50

Bowdoin College, ME

11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.



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TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings April 2009

      For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.       For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.       For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.


Liberal Arts Colleges

Colorado nips Williams, followed by Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, and Oberlin

Middlebury, Richmond, Union, Vassar and Bard in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008. Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days. The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm. To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Rank

1

Colorado College, CO

2

Williams College, MA

3

Amherst College, MA

4

Wellesley College, MA

5

Oberlin College, OH

6

Middlebury College, VT

7

University of Richmond, VA

8

Union College, NY

9

Vassar College, NY

10

Bard College, NY

11

Bowdoin College, ME

12

Bucknell University, PA

13

Swarthmore College, PA

14

Smith College, MA

15

Hamilton College, NY

16

Bryn Mawr College, PA

17

Colgate University, NY

18

Barnard College, NY

19

Lafayette College, PA

20

Mount Holyoke College, MA

21

Pomona College, CA

22

Trinity College, CT

23

Dickinson College, PA

24

Carleton College, MN

25

Davidson College, NC

26

Connecticut College, CT

27

Colby College, ME

28

Occidental College, CA

29

Grinnell College, IA

30

Haverford College, PA

31

Kenyon College, OH

32

Bates College, ME

33

Drew University, NJ

34

Reed College, WA

35

DePauw University, IN

36

Washington & Lee University, PA

37

Wesleyan University, CT

38

College of the Holy Cross, MA

39

Gettysburg College, PA

40

St Olaf College, MN

54

Macalester College, MN

41

Skidmore College, NY

42

Furman University, SC

43

Claremont McKenna College, CA

44

Whitman College, WA

45

Harvey Mudd College, CA

46

Centre College, KY

47

St Lawrence University, NY

48

Southwestern University, TX

49

Franklin and Marshall College, PA

50

Scripps College, NY

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

Previous benchmark was in aftermath of 9/11 attacks

.

Austin, TX March 24, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that the word ‘outrage’ has been used more in the global media this week than anytime this century. The previous benchmark was in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The analysis of the global printed and electronic media was concluded earlier today. 

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact.  The amount of anger and outrage as reflected in the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

In particular, the word has been quoted in association with the uproar over the AIG bonuses, as having been used by President Obama, his senior staff, members of congress, commentators, and ordinary citizens at large.  The GLM analysis included global print and electronic media since the turn of the 21st century. 

GLM examined word usage in the seven days following significant events including, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, the start of the Iraq War in 2003, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in September 2005.  The analysis included global print and electronic media. 

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media: 

1. AIX Bonuses, 2009

2. the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

Earlier GLM had reported that words of despair and fear have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s election as president of the United States on November 4, 2008, with examples abound, including  catastrophe,  depression, as in full-blown or impending disaster, collapse, and crisis, among many others.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

ENGLISH AND ITS ODDITIES; The word factory keeps producing

Editorial, March 4 2009

One million. These days, with billions in bailouts and trillions in debts, a million of anything doesn’t seem like all that much.

But a million English words? Hat and cat and poll and prestidigitation?

Sure, the dictionary’s full of words. But a regular Webster’s has only about 200,000 words in it. And the gold standard of English dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary, which comes in volumes, contains only about 600,000. And the average American’s vocabulary? 20,000 words. Ouch

Obviously, the Global Language Monitor knows more than the Oxford folks. That’s the organization contending English will add its one millionth word sometime next month

The group can’t, of course, foretell what that word will be. Maybe it’ll be a kid word, like “janky,” also sometimes spelled “jainky” or “jinky.” (These things are always fluid.) It apparently means anything from “substandard” to “weird” and often relates to other people. “That guy is sure janky!”

Superlatives are often expressed in new-slang: “Wooka,” for instance, is said to be the hottest way to say “Wow!” And “nang” means “absolutely fantastic!”

The Urban Dictionary, an online and hard-bound resource for slang- sensitive people, tries to keep current as the vernacular evolves. This is not easy; it offers a new word each day. “Gank,” it says, means “to steal.” “I didn’t have any money, so I ganked it.”

“Yinz” is the new way to say “y’all,” “you guys” or “you.”

“Janhvi” is a really amazing person who knows how to be a great friend

English has absorbed a variety of computer geekisms: “lol,” meaning “laugh out loud,” and, a kid-related warning, “prw,” meaning, “parents are watching.” And, by the way, “geek” itself is so far “out” of the argot that it has turned up in the dictionary. And it has a possible origin: It might be an alteration of the Low German “gek.” That’s pretty establishment

Of course, most of the words mentioned here have undoubtedly vanished from the patois, never to pass young lips again. As soon as adults become aware of a new slang word, you can bet it’s no longer “in,” “hot,” “with it.”

It’s sooooo lame, as nobody would say anymore.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Enhances College Reputation

TrendTopper enhances college reputation by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year, go here.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

For More Information about our reputation management services, please call 1.512.815.8836, or send email to pauljjpayack@gmail.com.



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‘Misunderestimate’ Tops List of All-Time Bushisms

‘Misunderestimate’ Tops List of All-Time Bushisms  

 

Compendium of Fifteen of the President’s ‘Greatest Hits’

 

Austin, TX January 7, 2009  – The Top All-Time Bushisms were released earlier today by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com). Topping the List were:

 

  • Misunderestimate,
  • Mission Accomplished,
  • Brownie, you’ve done a heck of a job!
  • I’m the decider, and
  • I use the Google.

 

 “The era of Bushisms is now coming to an end, and word watchers worldwide will have a hard time substituting Barack Obama’s precise intonations and eloquence for W’s unique linguistic constructions,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “The biggest linguistic faux pas of the Obama era thus far involves the use of the reflexive pronoun myself.  This is a refreshing shift from the Bush years.”

The rankings were nominated by language observers the world over and then ranked with the help of the Global Language Monitor’s PQI (Predictive-quantities Indicator).  The PQI is a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere.

The Top All-time Bushisms with commentary, follow.

 

1.     Misunderestimate. Stated in the immediate aftermath of the disputed 2000 election:  One of the first and perhaps most iconic Bushisms (Nov. 6, 2000).

2.     Mission Accomplished:  Never actually stated by the President but nevertheless the banner behind him was all that was needed to cement this phrase into the public imagination (May 1, 2003).

3.     “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” said to soon-to-be-discharged FEMA director Michael Brown. Stated in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; it came to symbolize the entire debacle (Sept. 2, 2005).

4.     “I’m the decider” came to symbolize the ‘imperial’ aspects of the Bush presidency.  Said in response to his decision to keep Don Rumsfeld on as the Secretary of Defense (April 18, 2006).   

5.     “I use The Google” said in reference to the popular search engine (October 24, 2006).

6.     Iraq Shoe Throwing Incident.  In Iraq, throwing a shoe is a symbol of immense disrespect.  Some have suggested this to be the visual equivalent of a spoken Bushism — Inappropriate, surprising, embarrassing yet compelling to repeat (December 14, 2008).

7.     “I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully” came to symbolize the President’s environmental policy (Sept. 29, 2000).

8.     “You work three jobs? … Uniquely American, isn’t it? I mean, that is fantastic that you’re doing that.” Critics used this to symbolize Bush’s detachment to the plight of the working class, said to a divorced mother of three in Omaha, Nebraska (Feb. 4, 2005)

9.     “Rarely is the questioned asked: Is our children learning?” was uttered before the first primaries back in 2000 (Jan. 11, 2000).

10.  “Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we” was cited by his critics as revealing his true thoughts (Aug. 5, 2004)

11.   It was not always certain that the U.S. and America would have a close relationship.”  The President was speaking of the Anglo-American relationship (June 29, 2006).

12.  “See, in my line of work you got to keep repeating things over and over and over again for the truth to sink in, to kind of catapult the propaganda.” Explaining his Communications strategy (May 24, 2005).

13.  “I think I may need a bathroom break. Is this possible?” scribbled on a note to Secretary of State Condi Rice during a UN Security Council meeting in 2005.

14.  “When the final history is written on Iraq, it will look just like a comma” (September 24, 2006).

15.  “Stay the course” was stated on numerous occasions during the course of the Iraq War.  Bush’s change of course with the Surge, actually made a dramatic difference in the conflict..

Other Presidents of the United States created their own words, some of which have entered the standard English vocabulary.  These include:

 

  • ADMINISTRATION (George Washington)
  • BELITTLE (Thomas Jefferson)   
  • BULLY PULPIT (Theodore Roosevelt)
  • CAUCUS (John Adams)                                      
  • COUNTERVAILING (Thomas Jefferson)
  • HOSPITALIZATION (Warren G. Harding)
  • MUCKRAKER (Theodore Roosevelt)
  • NORMALCY (Woodrow Wilson)
  • O.K. (Martin Van Buren)                            
  • SANCTION (Thomas Jefferson)                 

 

 

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@GlobalLanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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Word ‘Christmas’ Stronger than ever in Global Media

Contrary to assumption that “Holiday season” pushing Christmas aside

Austin, TX December 23, 2008 (Update) – The Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has found that contrary to the assumption that the word Christmas is being pushed aside by more secular or politically neutral terms, ‘Christmas’ is used over 600% more than ‘Holiday Season’ in the global media. GLM compared the use of Christmas along with that of ‘Holiday Season,’ ‘Xmas,’ Chanukah’ in a variety of spellings, and ‘Kwanzaa’ (see below for the various spellings of Chanukah).

Since the 2005 season, Christmas has been used in about 85% of all global print and electronic media citations [2008, 84.6%; 2007, 85.5%; 2006, 84.1%; 2005, 84.1%].

In the global media, Christmas accounted for about 84.6% of all citations with Holiday Season following at 12.6%, followed by Xmas (1.5%), Hanukah (0.9%) and Kwanzaa (0.3%). On the Internet, Christmas led with 80.8% followed by Xmas (10.6%), Holiday Season (5.1%), Hanukah (2.5%), and Kwanzaa (0.7%). Note: The X in the word Xmas actually represents the Greek letter CHI, the first two Letters in the name Christ.

Festivus, the fictional holiday created during the hit Seinfeld television series, and Wintervale, sometimes used as a politically neutral substitute for the Christmas season were also measured with negligible results.

GLM tracked the words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The analysis also measured the global print and electronic media on its own. The results follow

Global Media Percentage Internet Percentage
Christmas 84.6% Christmas 80.8%
Xmas 1.5% Xmas 10.6%
Holiday Season 12.6% Holiday Season 5.1%
Hannukah 0.9% Hannukah 2.5%
Kwanzaa 0.3% Kwanzaa 0.7%
Festivus 0.03% Festivus 0.1%
Wintervale 0.00% Wintervale 0.001%
Total 100.0% Total 100.0%

“We thought it would prove interesting to see how the holidays are actually represented in the global media,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “We were a bit surprised to see that the much discussed secularization of Christmas in the media was nowhere as widespread as speculated.”

Various Spellings of Chanukah

  • Chanuka
  • Chanukah (Most common in US)
  • Chanukkah
  • Channukah
  • Hanukah
  • Hannukah
  • Hanukkah
  • Hanuka
  • Hanukka
  • Hanaka
  • Haneka
  • Hanika
  • Khanukkah
Added 12/23/09 (thanks to Steven Teitel)

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com



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Top Words of ’08: Change beats Bailout and ObamaMania

Change beats Bailout and Obamamania as top word of 2008

 

Financial Tsunami is Top Phrase, Barack Obama is Top Name

 

Austin, TX December 1, 2008 – Change is the Top Word,  Financial Tsunami is Top Phrase, and Barack Obama is Top Name atop the Global Language Monitor’s (www.Languagemonitor.com) annual global survey of the English language.

The estimated number of words in the English language stands at 998,751, just 1,249 from the million-word mark.

“Global English has been driven by three notable events during the course of 2008:  The US Presidential Election, the Financial Tsunami, and the Beijing Olympics.” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. For 2008 our words were culled from throughout the English-speaking world which now numbers some 1.58 billion speakers and includes such diverse cultures as India, China, Philippines, and the EuroZone.

The analysis was completed using GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI), the proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the media and on the Internet. The words are tracked in relation to frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, factoring in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum and velocity.

The top words for 2007 were all ‘green’ oriented:  Hybrid was the Top Word, the Top Phrase was Climate Change, and the Top Name was Al Gore.(who won the Nobel Prize) for his efforts on Global Warming through ‘An Inconvenient Truth’. In an odd twist of history, Gore also won an academy award for the film.

The Top Word for 2006 were ‘sustainable,’ the Top Phrase was ‘Stay the Course’ (President Bush repeatedly describing his Iraq Strategy), and the Top Name was Dafur.

The Top Ten Words of 2008

  1. Change – The top political buzzword of the 2008 US Presidential campaign.
  2. Bailout – Would have been higher but was not in the media until Mid-September.
  3. Obamamania – Describing the worldwide reaction to Barack Obama’s campaign and subsequent victory in the US presidential race.
  4. Greenwashing – Repositioning a product to stress its Earth-friendly attributes.
  5. Surge – Military and political strategy often cited as reducing violence in Iraq.
  6. Derivative – Exotic financial instruments used to cleverly package junk-grade debt.
  7. Subprime – Mortgages that were packaged as derivatives.
  8. Foreclosure – The end-result of the sub-prime mess.
  9. Phelpsian:  New word coined to describe the Phelpsian Pheat of winning eight gold medals at the Beijing Olympics.
  10. Chinglish – The often amusing Chinese/English language hybrid that Beijing tried to stamp out before the Olympics began.

 The Top Ten Phrases of 2008

  1. Financial Tsunami – Worldwide financial meltdown ultimately stemming from derivatives used to package subprime mortgages.
  2. Global Warming – The No. 2 buzzword of the US Presidential Campaign.
  3. Yes We Can — Yes, indeed, he could and he did.
  4. Lame Duck – What happens when you wait 2 ½ months from election to inauguration.
  5. Working Class Whites – Apparently, working Class Whites is used as a code word for whites who are working class. 
  6. “It is, what it is” – On everyone’s lips this year meaning ‘unfortunately, those are the facts’.
  7. Lip Synching:  The fate of Lin Miaoke, the little girl who didn’t sing the song the whole world sings in the Olympics opening ceremony.
  8. Price of oil – Oil was supposed to topping out about now at $200/barrel.
  9. Super Tuesday – When the race for the Democratic nomination was supposed to be decided.
  10. Suddenness Happens – Top Chinglish Phrase from the Beijing Olympics.

The Top Ten Names for 2008

  1. Barack Obama –. President-elect of the United States.
  2. George W. Bush  Lame Duck, No. 43, The Decider.
  3. Michael Phelps — The top name of the top televison spectacle of all time (the Beijing Olympics)
  4. Hilary Clinton – She said ‘he can’t win;’ now she is his Secretary of State.
  5. Vladimir Putin – The supreme leader of Russia, whatever his title.
  6. Bono — U2’s front man also known for his efforts to raise awareness about AIDS in African, Third World debt and Unfair Trade practices.
  7. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad  Iran now claims 5,000 nuclear centrifuges.
  8. Sarah Palin – Governor of Alaska and vice presidential nominee of the Republican party.
  9. John McCain – Soon to be the answer to a trivia question: Mondale, Dole, Dukakis ….
  10. Beyonce – The R&B singer AKA as Sasha Fierce.

The Top Celeb Couple:  Sarkozy and Carla Bruni – Big hit for his policies and her former supermodel status (replacing David Beckham and Posh Spice).

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.



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