Ambush Marketing (and Marketing) Awards for the Sochi Winter Games Announced

Olympic Wrap-up, March 2014 Austin, Texas — The Global Language Monitor announced that Red Bull has taken the Gold for the Top Ambush Marketing Campaign, while Proctor & Gamble out-dueled a resurgent Samsung to take the Gold for the Top Marketing Campaign by an Official Sponsor for the recently concluded XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia.   For the Ambushers, Red Bull led comfortably over Subway, which took the Silver, and Rolex, a surprise winner of the Bronze;  Rolex was in a very tight race with both Unilever and Siemens. Following P&G for the Official Sponsors were Samsung taking the Silver, and Coca-Cola hauling in the Bronze.   P&G, Samsung and Coca-Cola all had critically acclaimed marketing campaigns that were well-received by global audiences.

Download the Official Sochi Marketing Report NOW!

The awards are determined by Global Language Monitor’s (GLM) Brand Affiliation Index (BAI),  a proprietary, longitudinal study that analyzes the global association between (and among) individual brands and their competitors or, in this case, the Sochi Winter Games.  In the study, The Global Language Monitor measured several dozen factors, closely examining all marketing movement extending from London 2012 to projections for the Rio 2016.  GLM has been tracking the Olympics in this manner  since the Beijing Summer Games.

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The Terra Cotta medal, the new award for least successful marketing campaign by an official partner, was contested by Visa Card, Omega, and Atos. Visa Card had the visibility without the impact of the P&G, Coke, and Samsung efforts.  Omega’s rank is a conundrum:  It appeared on the screen during every timed event, yet it, apparently, did not register in the minds of the global audience.  (This needs to be rectified.)  And Atos apparently doesn’t mind ‘winning’ the first Terra Cotta medal, since it has been dubbed the ‘Unsung Hero’ of the Games for creating Sochi’s vast (and effective) IT infrastructure. “The value of Olympic sponsorship continues to rise as evidenced by the bold attempts by the Ambush Marketers to associate their brands with the Sochi Winter Games.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.   “The more stringent the legislation to outlaw any effort to ‘ambush’ the Games, the more marketers seem intent on circumventing the rules.  And the more news related to ‘ambushing’ is highlighted by the media.  An example is a Sochi official taping over Apple’s logo in plain site of the global media (#EpicFailure)”. GLM uses its proprietary algorithmic services to perform brand audits, enabling organizations to judge their brand performance between and among their competitors and their peers.  The higher the BAI (Brand Affiliation Index) the closer the brand affiliation with the primary brand, in this case the Sochi Winter Olympics. Of course, not all Ambush Marketers plan to steal the Olympic glow from their competitors, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad. Therefore, GLM uses the term Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) for those, like Starbucks, who seem to engender a false impression of Olympic sponsorship, our research shows, because of their immense size, health-oriented menu, and image of busy, successful people dashing in and out. Nike, for example, is proud of its Ambush Marketing ‘stunts’ such as the ‘Yellow-Green Neon Shoe’ escapade in London 2012 — and the record backs them up. The Sochi All Marketers Final Ranking by BAI  is shown below.

Sochi All Marketers BAI Final

Of particular note are the following. 0  Red Bull’s connection with extreme and ‘uber-extreme’ sports has paid off, once again.  Red Bull topped all marketers (official and otherwise), out-distancing the Gold-winning P&G, the top official sponsor, by some nine percent. o  The Nike Stunt that Never Was — Though long anticipated, and expected, never materialized.  At the end of the London Summer Games, Nike’s BAI reached 223.98, compared with its final Sochi BAI of 30.25, a net difference of nearly 200 points. Nevertheless, the fact that some twenty months after London,  Nike is still ahead of three official Sponsors is testament to the lasting power of the London Stunt. o  P&G’s “Thank you, Mom” campaign had viewers anticipating and actually recording the commercials for later viewing.  The 316% increase from already-solid final London numbers is well deserved. o  Subway, the Ambush Silver medalist’s year-round promotions with current and former Olympic icons worked once again.  Subway’s 176.31 BAI topped that of eight of the 10 official sponsors. 0  In the battle between Coca-Cola, the Bronze medalist, and McDonald’s, long-time Olympic sponsors (and rivals), Coke more than doubled McDonald’s BAI (171.59 to 85.22).   The back story here:  Coca-Cola rose 48% from it London final, while McDonald’s was down about 8%. o  Unilever (109.73), the P&G rival finished as the No. 4 NAM and No.8 marketer overall.  Unilever rose some 800% over its London final (11.93). o  GE had a noteworthy Olympics rising some 60% over a very respectable London performance (91.22 vs 55.97).  GE’s commercials deftly detailed its incredibly broad range of products and services in a very entertaining manner.  Rival Siemens also scored well, in fact, actually besting GE by about nine percent. o  Apple Computer and Burton Snowboards both made an impression with the worldwide audience:  the former with the ‘tape incident’ where an Apple logo was taped over by a Sochi official (Mistake:  taping in full view  of the media) during a skating competition, and Burton, for its brazen attempt to place its over-sized logo on the very visible  underside of the boards of prominent snowboarders.

London to end of Sochi
Change Over Course of Sochi

In the study, GLM measured several dozen factors, including the change in BAI from the end of the London Summer Games in 2012 to the end of the Sochi Winter Games for both Top Partners and Non-Affiliated Marketers. In percentage gains, the Top Partners almost doubled, rising over 95%.  The biggest movers were Samsung, P&G, and Dow — all scoring triple-digit gains by percentage. However, the Non-Affiliated Marketers on the average almost quadrupled, up over 358%. .The largest gainers were Rolex (with a 1500% gain), Red Bull,Unilever, DuPont, and Siemens (all with triple-digit gains), and Subway. Measuring brands movements during the Sochi Games,themselves,  six of the Top Ten gainers were Ambushers, as shown below.

Sochi Change During Games

Red Bull made the largest move during the Sochi Games, followed by Top Partners GE and DOW.   Coca-Cola and McDonald’s (at No. 7 and 8) were the other Top Partners in the top ten.  Non-Affiliated Marketers Unilever, DuPont, IBM Global Services, Nike, and Starbucks all made strong moves during the Games. The “Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available; order here. Over the last four Olympics, the Global Language Monitor has been using its Brand Affiliation Index and NarrativeTracker technology to measure the relationship of the official Sponsors and their competitors to the various Olympics brands. This is a longitudinal study that reaches back to the Beijing Summer Games in 2008. The names of the sponsors change rarely, but the non-affiliated competitors remain a core group with others that come on to the Olympic platform for but a cycle or two. GLM has found that there are many misconceptions continue to persist despite the evidence.

If you are looking for these or similar analyses for your event, company, organization, university, or brands, call 1.512.815.8836, or email info@LanguageMonitor.com.

About the Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.  The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.  Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.
 “Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available for download order here.

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Sochi 2014 Brand Marketing Games: Subway Leads P&G for Gold, Red Bull vs. GE for Silver, McDonald’s Falters

Sochi Olympic Logo
Sochi Rings

Where’s Nike?

Subway Leads P&G for Gold, Red Bull vs. GE for Silver, McDonald’s Falters

Terra Cotta Medals Introduced

Sochi Olympics Week Two, February, 2014 Austin, Texas — After the first full week of the Sochi Winter Games, the marketing medal count finalized with the competition between and among the official sponsors and the Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) is tight, according to the Global Language Monitor.  Some highlights include Subway leading P&G for the Gold, Red Bull contending with GE for Silver, and McDonald’s apparently faltering thus far.  The complete details are shown in the charts below.

 

Download Final Report Here!
Download Final Report Here!

 

Also, since no one can be eliminated from the Games once they begin, GLM has introduced the Terra Cotta medal in addition to the traditional Gold, Silver, and Bronze.  In the Ancient world, Terra Cotta was considered the least valuable material for permanence (after gold, silver, and bronze).

The Terra Cotta Medal is depicted below.

Sochi Silver Medal
Sochi Silver Medal
Sochi Gold Medal
Sochi Gold Medal
Sochi Bronze Medal
Sochi Bronze Medal
Terra Cotta Medal
Terra Cotta Medal

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“While the eyes of the world are focused on the athletes and the intense struggle on the ice and snow in Sochi, the eyes of the marketing world are keenly aware of the battle being waged for the billions of dollars in brand equity for being associated with the Winter Games.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.

Some highlights from the longitudinal study:

  • P&G has had an extraordinary Olympics thus far and will be in serious contention for the overall Gold.
  • Coke has a towering lead over McDonald’s, more a testament to Coke improving and Mickey D’s essentially treading water.
  • Rolex has improved , in terms of BAI from 6.1 in London to 144.23 today.
  • Red Bull leads the pack in the for Silver contenders.  After all, if you jump from a Space Capsule to Earth, you’re must be affiliated with Red Bull.
  • GE and Siemens are neck-and-neck; Siemens moved down two spots, while GE was up four.
  • Unilever sits comfortably at No. 9,  up one from last week.
  • Great commercials are bringing home the fact GE is (a lot) more than light bulbs.
  • Dow (No. 13) is up 2 this week, while DuPont (No.14) is down 2.
  • IBM Global Services and Atos Origin come in at No. 19 and 21, however they are both B-to-B plays and as long as they connect to the right people.
  • Omega deserves a higher profile; though they are on the screen for key moments of every competition, they are down in Terra Cotta territory.
  • Finally, Where is Nike?  They are ready to pounce, but no pouncing evidenced thus far.

Sochi Olympics Marketing Race: Subway Leads Ambush Marketers, Samsung and P&G Lead Top Sponsors

 

See Final Medal Standings
Final Marketing Medal Standings

Subway takes the early combined-event lead; Rolex, Red Bull, and Nike among fastest Risers

 

Sochi Ambush Marketing Report Image

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Sochi Olympics Week One, February, 2014 Austin, Texas — The first stage of the Sochi Olympics Marketing race is in the books.  And thus far the Non-affiliated Marketers are making their impact felt.  

In the early the first stage of the two-week long event,  the Non-affiliated Marketers (or Ambush Marketers) are leading the TOP Sponsors by GLM’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) by a significant margin in a number of measures.

Sochi-Marketing-Leaders-Week 1

“Though not as prestigious as the games on the field, in the snow, and on the ice, the Ambush Marketing Race can mean billions in profits for the winners, and uncontrollable value leaks to the losers,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

The ten TOP Sochi Sponsors are Atos Origin, Coca-Cola, Dow, GE, McDonald’s, Omega, P&G, Panasonic, Samsung, and Visa Card.  

The eleven Non-affiliated (or Ambush Marketers) are Adidas, DuPont, IBM Global Services, Nike, Pepsi, Philips, Red Bull, Rolex, Siemens, Starbucks, Subway, and Unilever.  

Some of these organizations compete head-to-head with the Top Sponsors, such as IBM Global Services (vs. Atos Origin), Pepsi and Red Bull (vs. Coca-Cola), DuPont (vs. Dow Chemical), Royal Philips (vs. General Electric), while others simply co-opt the Olympic brand equity to their own particular advantage.

The Global Language Monitor uses proprietary algorithmic services to perform brand audits, enabling organizations to judge their brand performance between and among their competitors and their peers.  

The higher the BAI (Brand Affiliation Index) the closer the brand affiliation with the primary brand, in this case the Sochi Winter Olympics. Of course, not all Ambush Marketers plan to steal the Olympic glow from their competitors, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad.

Therefore, GLM uses the term Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) for those, like Starbucks, who seem to engender a false impression of Olympic sponsorship, our research shows, because of their immense size, health-oriented menu, and image of busy, successful people dashing in and out. Nike, for example, is proud of its Ambush Marketing ‘stunts’ such as the ‘Yellow-Green Neon Shoe’ escapade in London 2012.  and the record backs them up..  Twenty months after its stunt in London, it still is ranks higher than the BAI of three IOC Partners..

Subway, in turn, leads all Sochi Marketers with its unbridled, and some say outrageous athlete-focused commercials.   As you see in the along side chart, six of the top ten and eleven of the top 20 marketers fit into the NAM category.  (You can see that Red Bull is firmly ensconced in the top ten.

Over the last four Olympics, the Global Language Monitor has been using its Brand Affiliation Index and NarrativeTracker technology to measure the relationship of the official Sponsors and their competitors to the various Olympics brands. This is a longitudinal study that reaches back to the Beijing Summer Games in 2008.  The names of the sponsors change rarely, but the non-affiliated competitors remain a core group with others that come on to the Olympic platform for but a cycle or two. GLM has found that there are many misconceptions continue to persist despite the evidence.

One of these misconceptions is that ambush marketing ‘stunts’ are wildly successful, such as Nike’s green shoe stunt in London.  The Data say yes-and-no.  The stunt made quite an impression for a week or two, and the lingering value can be seen in the Sochi Leaders by BAI chart.  In the along side chart, you see that Nike has a current BAI of 26.30; immediately after the London stunt it measured 120.5.

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Sochi Olympic Marketing Report 90 Days Out

Olympic Marketing at Sochi  Special Report:   Free to download from …

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To Read the Rest of the Article, click here

For more information on the ongoing longitudinal study. call +1 512 815 8836.

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The Ambush Marketing Race to the Sochi Olympics is on!

 

P&G, Samsung and GE lead Worldwide Partners but trail Philips, Siemens and Adidas

Ten of the top 15 spots are occupied by the Non-affiliated Marketers

The race to the Rio Summer Olympics (2016) is not far behind

 

Sochi Ambush Marketing Report Image

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AUSTIN, Texas August 30 – September 2, 2013 — Six months out, the race for the Top Marketers of the Sochi Winter Olympics is in full swing. And the race to the Rio Summer Olympics of 2016 is not far behind, according to the “Sochi 2014 Ambush Marketing Outlook” report released by the Global Language Monitor (GLM), the brand equity trend tracking firm. P&G, Samsung and GE lead the Worldwide Partners but trail Non-affiliated Marketers Philips, Siemens and Adidas. When measured by GLM’s proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI),10 of the top 15 spots are occupied by the Non-affiliated Marketers – with the bottom five spots all held by top sponsors. The longitudinal study began in July 2011 and tracks the top Worldwide Partners as designated by the Sochi Organizing Committee (SOC) and IOC.

The Global Language Monitor has been conducting brand audits of the top Olympic sponsors and their unaffiliated competitors since the Beijing Summer Games.

In the study conducted throughout August, three brands among Sochi’s ten Worldwide Olympic Partners, P&G, Samsung and GE have already achieved significant brand affiliation with Sochi, while McDonald’s, Panasonic and Coca-Cola had some brand affiliation. The Sochi Winter Olympics have ten Worldwide Olympic Partners: Atos Origin, Coca-Cola, Dow Chemical, General Electric, McDonald’s, Omega watches. Panasonic, Procter & Gamble (P&G), Samsung, and Visa Card.

For these rankings GLM measured the strength of the brand affiliation for each official Olympic sponsor against those of their primary non-affiliated competitors. Though ‘ambush marketing’ is well understood to mean an organization knowingly exploiting a brand affiliation with the Games without the benefit of official sponsorship, all perceived Olympic affiliations according to their presence in the global media, and statistically linked to the the particular event, qualify for GLM’s Ambush Marketing rankings.

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Olympic Lingo: Obscure Words Related to the London 2012 Summer Games

Austin, Texas. July 30, 2012 . In the spirit of public service, the editors of the Global Language Monitor, have selected a number of the more obscure words and phrases related to the London 2012 Summer Olympics and presented below with definitions and/or related factoids. “The history of the Olympic Games spans over 2800 years, with the Games themselves persisting for over 1,000 years in the Ancient World,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of GLM. “The Games have garnered a rich tapestry of linguistic innovation concerning the nature of the Games, the individual sports, and the rituals surrounding the quadrennial festival.” Below are some of the more obscure words and phrases with definitions and/or related factoids.

  1. Citius, Altius, Fortius (Olympic History) — The Olympic Motto is actually Latin (and not Greek) for Faster, Higher, Stronger)
  2. Dead Rubber (Tennis) — A match in a series where the outcome has already been decided by previous matches
  3. Eggbeater (Water Polo) — Kicking one’s feet quickly in a back-and-forth motion keep the body above water
  4. Fletching (Archery) — Traditionally, feathers from the left wing of a turkey, goose, or raptor used to stabilize an arrow; now replaced with synthetics
  5. Flu-Flu Arrow (Archery) — An arrow with extra ‘fletching’ to slow its flight
  6. High Drag Projectile (Badminton) — The birdie or shuttlecock
  7. Impulsion (Equestrian) — The thrust, impelling, or pushing power of a horse
  8. Kotinos (Olympic History) — Olive branches fixed in crowns of victory in the classical Greek Olympics
  9. Marathon (Olympic History — The word Marathon is derived from the Greek for fennel, the spice which apparently grew in abundance on the plains
  10. Nutmeg or Nuttie (Football) — Kicking the football between the legs of an opponent
  11. Pankration — A sport contested beginning in the 7th century BCE, that combined wrestling and boxing (similar to today’s Mixed Martial Arts)
  12. Pheidippidean Pheat (Olympic History) — Forget the Phelpsian Pheat of the Beijing Games, according to legend Pheidippides ran from the battlefield of Marathon to Athens pronounced, Victory! and then promptly died. (The actual distance was about 24 miles or 38.6 km.
  13. Repechage — First round losers are provided another opportunity to advance in a competition
  14. The Snatch Deadlift (Weightlifting)– Lifting the barbell in a single movement, as opposed to the Clean and Jerk
  15. Victor Ludorum (Olympic History) — The Champion of the Games, in Latin of course.

GLM has been tracking language at the Olympics since the Athens Games in 2004.


Olympic (Ambush) Competition Officially Under Way

Ambushers Leading Sponsors 33-17

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Billions of Dollars in Brand Equity at Stake

AUSTIN, Texas.  July 18, 2012 — Of the Top Fifty Brands affiliated with the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games only seventeen are official sponsors.  This according to the latest Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) analysis by the Global Language Monitor, the Internet media trend tracking company.  The longitudinal study began in July 2011 and tracks the top three tiers of official Olympic sponsorship, as designated by the LOGOC and the IOC.

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“Fortunately in the Olympics there is no ‘mercy rule,’ where a winner is declared in a contest to reach twenty-one, when one side scores the first 11 points,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.   Of the top official and ‘non-affiliated marketers’ in the current study, the first twelve fall into the non-affiliated category.”

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Some seventy-five brands are studied including the twenty-five premier official sponsors divided into three tiers:  The TOP partners, which pay approximately one hundred million pounds for the privilege,  the Official Olympic Partners, and the Official Olympic Sponsors.  Together these sponsors pay an estimated 30% of the cost of staging the games.

There are a number of other levels and forms of sponsorship including national sponsorships such as the USOC.  The real cost of being a TOP partner ranges from a $500 billion to over a trillion dollar investment to companies that sign on for sponsorships spanning several Olympiads.

For these rankings GLM measured the strength of the brand affiliation for each official Olympic sponsor against those of their primary non-affiliated competitors. Though ‘ambush marketing’ is well understood to mean an organization knowingly exploiting a brand affiliation with the Games without the benefit of official sponsorship, all perceived Olympic affiliations according to their presence in the global media, and statistically linked to the London Games, qualify for GLM’s Ambush Marketing rankings.

Ambushing by ‘Non-affiliated Marketers’ is more than Michael Phelps pitching sandwiches; it is a years-long effort to create a pseudo-sponsorship to leverage the good-well generated by having the Olympics with one’s brand.

The GLM Brand Affiliation Index for this analysis,ranged from a high of 797.90 (Royal Philips} to a low of 1.50 for VisaCard.  The higher the score, the closer the brand affiliation with the event.

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The Top Twelve (all Ambushers), along with their tiers, are Listed below:

1 Royal Philips TOP-A
2 CVC Capital OOP-A
3 ExxonMobil OOP-A
4 Manpower OOS-A
5 Schroders OOP-A
6 IBM Global TOP-A
7 E ON Energy OOP-A
8 KPMG OOS-A
9 Deutsche Telekom OOP-A
10 BASF TOP-A
11 EI DuPont TOP-A
12 Cable & Wireless OOP-A

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As you can see for the above rankings, Business-to-Business brands are being subjected to the sames ambush marketing forces as B2C marketers.  ‘

Royal Philips is crushing GE by over 20:1 margin; ExxonMobil bests BP by a similar margin; and BASF and DuPont are both striding past Dow.

The Top Ten Official Sponsors ranked from No. 13 to No. 39 overall.  They are listed below, along with their tiers.

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1 BT Group OOP
2 Cadbury OOS
3 BMW OOP
4 Adidas OOP
5 Panasonic TOP
6 McDonald;s TOP
7 Coca-Cola TOP
8 UPS OOS
9 P&G TOP
10 EDF energy OOP
11 Arcelor Mittal OOS
12 Samsung TOP

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Though listed at the top official sponsor, the BT group actually ranks behind both Deutsche Telekom and Cable&Wireless.

Cadbury, McDonald’s and Coca-Cola are doing quite well for their investments in spite of the efforts to derail their sponsorships on the grounds of their contributing to a so-called ‘obesogenic’ environment.  Adidas is currently doubling Nike’s number.  P&G  continues to excel with their ‘Moms’ campaign.  Arcelor Mittal is a surprise standout for a company previously little known to the public.

GLM has been measuring the effects of Ambush marketing on the Olympic Movement for the last three Olympiads, in the process accumulating perhaps the most extensive database of its kind.   For London 2012, GLM began tracking the three tiers of official sponsors since the third quarter of 2011.  GLM also tracks the brand equity of the athletes before and during the Games. For more information, call +1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or click on www.LanguageMonitor.com


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