Seemingly chaotic events reflect normalcy of new reality

 

An Historical Inflection Point:

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The US Presidential Election and the Fianancial Tsunami

 

Austin, Texas, USA.   October 13, 2008. The worldwide financial tsunami that has captured the attention of the worldwide media (as well as governments, corporations and ordinary citizens), has come to dominate one of the great quadrennial media events of the post-Modern era.  No, we are not referring to the Olympics, most recently held in Beijing, or even football’s World Cup but, rather, the US Presidential elections.

The immediate effect of this unprecedented upheaval of global markets is the obfuscation of the clear lines of division offered by the opposing parties in the US Presidential Elections.

There is the sense that we are witnessing an unprecedented historical event; historical in the sense that we now appear to be standing astride (or atop) a cusp in history, a delta, a decision point, what is now called a point of inflection or inflection point.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us. 

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the Tsunami washing over the planet at a steady speed and ever-quicker pace.  Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t change at all.  It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality:  News now emanates at the speed of thought, from tens of thousands or, even, millions of sources.

The nature of a Tsunami is little understood other than the tremendous damage it unleashes when it washes ashore.  What we do know, however, is that a tsunami travels in exceedingly long waves (tens of kilometers in length) racing through the oceanic depths at hundreds of kilometers per hour.  Only upon reaching the shore is its true destructive power unleashed for all to see (if they survive to witness it at all). 

In the same manner, the traditional media become transfixed with the roiling surface seas but fail to acknowledge the more sustained and significant, movements occurring just beneath the surface.

The surface swirls about in fascinating eddies, but the true transformation is occurring as the nearly undetectable waves rush through the open sea only occasionally, though dramatically, making their way onto shore. 

In the same manner, the traditional media focuses on the Twenty-four-hour News Cycle but seem to miss the strong and prevalent currents immediately beneath the surface.  They vainly attempt to tie global, transformative, and unprecedented events to relatively parochial events and forces (the Reagan Years, the Clinton administration, Bush 41 and 43, the de-regulation initiatives of Alan Greenspan of  ‘99) that are being all but over-shadowed (and –whelmed) by unyielding and all-but irresistible forces.

There is an almost palpable sense and correct sense that things are 1) changing forever, 2) out of our control (or even influence), and 3) will have a direct impact upon the planet for generations to follow.

What we can control, and make sense of, however, is a candidate’s wink, smirk or disdainful reference.  We can emphatically pin down our opponents into convenient sound bites, hopefully contradicting earlier sound bites.  Do you personally take responsibility for Climate Change?  (Does the fact that New York City was beneath 5,000 feet of Ice a few dozen centuries ago influence your vote today? A yes or no will suffice!)  Is your personal philosophy, whatever it might be, grounded in a belief system that I can systematically debunk and demean.  (Yes or no.)  Are you for or against atom smashers creating miniscule black holes that may or may not swallow up the Earth?   (Answer yes and you are a barbarian; answer no and you have absolutely no respects of the future prospects of the human race.)  Did you ever consider yourself a loser (at any point in your life)?  Did you ever make the acquaintance of fellow losers? 

Nevertheless, the US Presidential Election will proceed to its own conclusion on the first Tuesday of November in the year two thousand and eight.

For the preceding five years, The Global Language Monitor has attempted to clarify the course (and future course) of human events as documented in the English language.

The tools at our disposal have sometimes allowed us to peer into events and trends that become, otherwise, obscured, by the ‘noise’ of the Twenty-four Hour News Cycle.

Our goal was, and continues to be, to extricate (and explicate upon) the true currents underpinning the events we call news, and to better understand what they mean and how they are perceived with the new media reality in mind.

For example, back in the days preceding the 2004 Presidential election cycle, GLM discovered the fact that once ideas, words and phrases were launched into the vast, uncharted, oceanic Internet, they do not, indeed, die out after twenty-four hours but, rather, travel in deep, powerful currents and waves (not unlike those of a tsunami) that only grow stronger as they make their ways to distant shores.

In this new reality, tsunami-like ideas pass through vast seas of information of the Internet, nearly undetected and often unmeasured, until they crash upon our shorelines, where their full power (and possibly fury) is unleashed.

The fact that we only entertain them for 24 hours before they are dispatched into the archives of what is considered ‘past’ or ‘passed’ and readily discarded, is beyond the point.

We often hear that ‘we’ve never seen anything like this’ before.  Of course not.  Think back a few hundred years to other information revolutions, such as that introduced along with mechanical type.  What do you think the fortunate few thought when they first laid their eyes upon the works of Aristotle, the Bible, or the Arabic translations of Euclid?  No one had ever seen anything like that before!  Indeed.

And astonishment will only become more so as the future unfolds.

 

– Paul JJ Payack, President & Chief Word Analyst, The Global Language Monitor

For mor information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.


 

College Rankings (Momentum) — April 2009

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

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For 2009 College Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum
Rank Overall
1 Bard College, NY 10
2 Colorado College, CO 1
3 Harvey Mudd College, CA 45
4 Wesleyan University, CT 37
5 St Olaf College, MN 40
6 Grinnell College, IA 29
7 Holy Cross, MA 38
8 Gettysburg College, PA 39
9 Claremont McKenna, CA 43
10 St Lawrence, NY 47
11 Drew University, NJ 33
12 Occidental College, CA 28
13 Davidson College, NC 25
14 Southwestern U., TX 48
15 Skidmore College, NY 41
16 U. of Richmond, VA 7
17 Middlebury College, VT 6
18 Furman University, SC 42
19 Trinity College, CT 22
20 Macalester College, MN 54
21 Reed College, OR 34
22 Amherst College, MA 3
23 Connecticut College, CT 26
24 Whitman College, WA 44
25 Wellesley College, MA 4
26 Colgate University, NY 17
27 DePauw University, IN 35
28 Centre College, KY 46
29 Lafayette College, PA 19
30 Colby College, ME 27
31 Pomona College, CA 28
32 Scripps College, CA 50
33 Barnard College, NY 18
34 Kenyon College, OH 31
35 Swarthmore College, PA 13
36 Bucknell University, PA 12
37 Haverford College, PA 30
38 Bates College, ME 32
39 Hamilton College, NY 15
40 Dickinson College, PA 23
54 Mount Holyoke, MA 20
41 Union College, NY 8
42 Washington & Lee, PA 36
43 Smith College, MA 14
44 Williams College, MA 2
45 Oberlin College, OH 5
46 Bryn Mawr College, PA 16
47 Vassar College, NY 9
48 Franklin & Marshall, PA 49
49 Carleton College, MN 24
50 Bowdoin College, ME 11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page


University Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.

For 2009 Top Colleges Rankings, click here.

Media Momentum

CalTech nips Emory, Boston College, Georgia Tech and Tufts follow

Southern Cal, Rice, Georgetown, Vanderbilt and Brandeis in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 7, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Momentum

University

Overall

1.

CalTech

22

2.

Emory University, GA

39

3.

Boston College, MA

26

4.

GeorgiaTech

32

5.

Tufts University, MA

45

6.

U. of Southern California

30

7.

Rice University, TX

48

8.

Georgetown University, DC

34

9.

Vanderbilt University, TN

38

10.

Brandeis University, MA

54

11.

Wake Forest, NC

52

12.

Syracuse University, NY

37

13.

Northwestern, IL

23

14.

Dartmouth College, NH

47

15.

Notre Dame, IN

46

16.

Tulane University, LA

51

17.

Auburn University, AL

50

18.

Case Western Reserve, OH

44

19,

Rensselaer (RPI), NY

57

20.

U. of Texas—Austin

24

21.

California—Santa Barbara

31

22.

Baylor University, TX

55

23.

Carnegie Mellon, PA

41

24.

Washington U., MO

42

25.

Texas A&M University

40

26.

University of Georgia

33

27.

Lehigh University , PA

58

28.

Boston University, MA

20

29.

Villanova University, PA

60

30.

William and Mary, VA

59

31.

Princeton University, NJ

8

32.

University of MN

60

33.

Purdue University, IN

28

34.

U. of California, Irvine

60

35.

U. of  Wisconsin—Madison

6

36.

New York University

18

37.

MIT

16

38.

University of Virginia

27

39,

PennState

36

40.

University of Florida

25

41.

Columbia University, NY

2

42.

University of Washington

12

43.

Ohio State University

13

44.

U. of  California—Irvine

43

45.

U. of Pennsylvania

11

46.

Stanford University, CA

5

47.

Rutgers University, NJ

35

48.

Yale University, CT

9

49.

U. of California—Davis

60

50.

U. of North Carolina

17

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.


College Rankings (Momentum) April 2009

Liberal Arts Colleges — Momentum

Bard nips Colorado College, followed by Harvey Mudd, Wesleyan, & St Olaf

Grinnel, Holy Cross, Gettysburg, Claremont McKenna & St Lawrence in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings

Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services

The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008.

Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity.

Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008.

Velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm.

To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Colleges–Momentum

Rank

Overall

1

Bard College, NY

10

2

Colorado College, CO

1

3

Harvey Mudd College, CA

45

4

Wesleyan University, CT

37

5

St Olaf College, MN

40

6

Grinnell College, IA

29

7

Holy Cross, MA

38

8

Gettysburg College, PA

39

9

Claremont McKenna, CA

43

10

St Lawrence, NY

47

11

Drew University, NJ

33

12

Occidental College, CA

28

13

Davidson College, NC

25

14

Southwestern U., TX

48

15

Skidmore College, NY

41

16

U. of Richmond, VA

7

17

Middlebury College, VT

6

18

Furman University, SC

42

19

Trinity College, CT

22

20

Macalester College, MN

54

21

Reed College, OR

34

22

Amherst College, MA

3

23

Connecticut College, CT

26

24

Whitman College, WA

44

25

Wellesley College, MA

4

26

Colgate University, NY

17

27

DePauw University, IN

35

28

Centre College, KY

46

29

Lafayette College, PA

19

30

Colby College, ME

27

31

Pomona College, CA

28

32

Scripps College, CA

50

33

Barnard College, NY

18

34

Kenyon College, OH

31

35

Swarthmore College, PA

13

36

Bucknell University, PA

12

37

Haverford College, PA

30

38

Bates College, ME

32

39

Hamilton College, NY

15

40

Dickinson College, PA

23

54

Mount Holyoke, MA

20

41

Union College, NY

8

42

Washington & Lee, PA

36

43

Smith College, MA

14

44

Williams College, MA

2

45

Oberlin College, OH

5

46

Bryn Mawr College, PA

16

47

Vassar College, NY

9

48

Franklin & Marshall, PA

49

49

Carleton College, MN

24

50

Bowdoin College, ME

11

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com.


TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings April 2009

      For 2009 College Momentum Rankings, click here.       For 2009 Top University Rankings, click here.       For 2009 University Momentum Rankings, click here.


Liberal Arts Colleges

Colorado nips Williams, followed by Amherst, Williams, Wellesley, and Oberlin

Middlebury, Richmond, Union, Vassar and Bard in Top Ten

Exclusive Internet-based College and University Rankings Austin, Texas.   April 8, 2009.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.  The analysis is the only college ranking including Social Media.

Learn more about GLM’s College Reputation Management Services The analysis was concluded in early April.  The measurement period began 12/31/2008. Several interim ‘snapshots’ were also made during the period to determine momentum and velocity. Momentum is defined as change since the last day of 2008; velocity is defined as movements over the preceding 30 days. The TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking are powered by the Global Language Monitor’s Predictive Quantities Indicator, a proprietary algorithm. To learn more about the PQI, click here.

Liberal Arts Colleges

Rank

1

Colorado College, CO

2

Williams College, MA

3

Amherst College, MA

4

Wellesley College, MA

5

Oberlin College, OH

6

Middlebury College, VT

7

University of Richmond, VA

8

Union College, NY

9

Vassar College, NY

10

Bard College, NY

11

Bowdoin College, ME

12

Bucknell University, PA

13

Swarthmore College, PA

14

Smith College, MA

15

Hamilton College, NY

16

Bryn Mawr College, PA

17

Colgate University, NY

18

Barnard College, NY

19

Lafayette College, PA

20

Mount Holyoke College, MA

21

Pomona College, CA

22

Trinity College, CT

23

Dickinson College, PA

24

Carleton College, MN

25

Davidson College, NC

26

Connecticut College, CT

27

Colby College, ME

28

Occidental College, CA

29

Grinnell College, IA

30

Haverford College, PA

31

Kenyon College, OH

32

Bates College, ME

33

Drew University, NJ

34

Reed College, WA

35

DePauw University, IN

36

Washington & Lee University, PA

37

Wesleyan University, CT

38

College of the Holy Cross, MA

39

Gettysburg College, PA

40

St Olaf College, MN

54

Macalester College, MN

41

Skidmore College, NY

42

Furman University, SC

43

Claremont McKenna College, CA

44

Whitman College, WA

45

Harvey Mudd College, CA

46

Centre College, KY

47

St Lawrence University, NY

48

Southwestern University, TX

49

Franklin and Marshall College, PA

50

Scripps College, NY

Click here to return to the College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com


‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

‘Outrage’ in global media higher than anytime this century

Previous benchmark was in aftermath of 9/11 attacks

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Austin, TX March 24, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has found that the word ‘outrage’ has been used more in the global media this week than anytime this century. The previous benchmark was in the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  The analysis of the global printed and electronic media was concluded earlier today. 

“There is a feeling that the outrage is unprecedented, and the numbers certainly demonstrate the fact.  The amount of anger and outrage as reflected in the media is, indeed, unprecedented,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

In particular, the word has been quoted in association with the uproar over the AIG bonuses, as having been used by President Obama, his senior staff, members of congress, commentators, and ordinary citizens at large.  The GLM analysis included global print and electronic media since the turn of the 21st century. 

GLM examined word usage in the seven days following significant events including, the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001, the start of the Iraq War in 2003, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina disaster in September 2005.  The analysis included global print and electronic media. 

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media: 

1. AIX Bonuses, 2009

2. the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

Earlier GLM had reported that words of despair and fear have been drowning out those of ‘Hope’ in the Global Media since Obama’s election as president of the United States on November 4, 2008, with examples abound, including  catastrophe,  depression, as in full-blown or impending disaster, collapse, and crisis, among many others.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com


TrendTopper MediaBuzz Enhances College Reputation

TrendTopper enhances college reputation by distinguishing ‘brand’ among peers

Helps to slow or reverse enrolment decline

Austin, TX February 25, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year, go here.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

For More Information about our reputation management services, please call 1.512.815.8836, or send email to pauljjpayack@gmail.com.


Trending: Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage on the Rise


Trend:  Disillusionment, Anger & Outrage

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on the Rise Since Obama’s inauguration

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‘Deficit of Trust’ and ‘Numbing weight of our political process’ appear to be keepers

Obama State of the Union at 8th Grade Level; Deft use of Passive Constructions

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Austin, TX February 1, 2010.  According to an exclusive analysis by the Global Language Monitor, the disillusionment, anger, and outrage acknowledged by President Obama in his State of the Union address has been on the rise since Obama’s election in November 2008.

“Much has been written about what the President in his State of the Union message called the ‘numbing weight of our political process’ and the ‘deficit of trust’ it thus engenders,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst.  “The disillusionment, anger and outrage should not be a surprise, especially to students of political language, who have been analyzing what is being said in the political realm over the last 18 months.  (That this comes as a revelation to our political elites, however, should serve, once again, as a sobering lesson or, even, cautionary tale.)”

Though little noticed by the media, GLM found that in early February, just weeks after the Obama inauguration, the ‘words of despair and fear relating to the global economic meltdown were drowning out those of hope in the global media in the ninety days since the US presidential election on November 4, 2008’.

The representative fear-related words chosen:  Fear, Despair, Abandoned, Desperate and/or Desperation.  In its analysis of the global print and electronic media since the US presidential election, GLM found that those words were used with 18-23% more frequency than compared to their use in the ninety days following the terrorist attacks of 9/11 of 2001 and 90-days following the beginning of the Iraq War in March 2003.  (Even the word fear, itself, was at some 85% of the level it was used in the aftermath of both the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the onset of the Iraq War.)

In a separate but related study released in late March, Global Language Monitor found that the word ‘outrage’ had been used more in the global media that month than anytime this century, with the previous benchmark being the immediate aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.  In particular, the word was used in association with the AIG bonuses, which had recently been distributed.

GLM examined the global print and electronic media for the seven days after the following events:  the 9/11 terrorist attacks in, the start of the Iraq War, and the week after the Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast.

The ranking of ‘outrage’ usage in the media:

1. AIG Bonuses, 2009

2. 9/11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001

3. Hurricane Katrina, 2005,

4. Iraq War, 2005

State of the Union Linguistic Analysis

In an evaluation of the State of the Union message, GLM found that the President used the passive voice to deflect responsibility (a time-honored SOTU tradition), and according to the White House transcript there was an overabundance of semi-colons (two dozen plus), some used correctly others in a baffling manner.  And then there was the grammatical lapse in disagreement in number:  “Each of these institutions are (sic) full of honorable men and women ….”    For the record, the President’s address came in at the 8.6 grade level, use of the passive was about 5%, the Grade Level was 8.6 (a bit higher than his Grant Park speech), and reading ease at 62 on a scale of 100 (not as easy to read as to hear).

For more details, send email to editor@globallanguagemonitor.com or call 1.925.367.7557.

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com


Most Confusing High Tech Buzzwords (2008)

 

Cloud Computing, Green Washing & Buzzword Compliant

 

Austin Texas November 21, 2008 — In its third annual Internet and media analysis, The Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has found the most confusing yet frequently cited high tech buzzwords of 2008 to be cloud computing, green washing, and buzzword compliant followed by resonate, de-duping, and virtualization.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Web 2.0, versioning, word clouds, and petaflop.  The most confusing Acronym for 2008 was SaaS (software as a service).

 

Paul JJ Payack, president of the Global Language Monitor, said “The words we use in high technology continue to become even more obtuse even as they move out of the realm of jargon and into the language at large.”

 

The Most Confusing Yet Frequently Cited High Tech Words of 2008 with Commentary follow:

 

·         Cloud Computing – Distributing or accessing programs and services across the Internet.  (The Internet is represented as a cloud.) 

·         Green washing – Repositioning your product so that its shortfalls are now positioned as environmental benefits:  Not enough power?  Just re-position as energy-saving.

·         Buzzword Compliant — Including the latest buzzwords in literature about a product or service in order to make it ‘resonate’ with the customer.

·         Resonate – Not the tendency of a system to oscillate at maximum amplitude, but the ability to relate to (or resonate with) a customer’s desires.

·         De-duping – shorthand for de-duplication, that is, removing redundant data from a system.

·         Virtualization – Around since dinosaurs walked the planet (the late ‘70s) virtualization now applies to everything from infrastructures to I/O.

·         Web 2.0 – Now there’s talk of Web 3.0, just when we were finally getting used to Web 2.0.

·         Versioning – Creating new revisions (or versions) with fewer bugs and more features.

·         Word Clouds – Graphic representations of the words used in a text, the more frequently used, the larger the representation.

·         Petaflop –  A thousand trillion (or quadrillion) floating point operations per second  Often mistaken as a comment on the environmental group.

The Most Confusing Yet Frequently Cited Acronym for 2008:  SaaS — software-as-as-service to be differentiated, of course, from PaaS (platforms as a service) and IaaS (Infrastructure-as-a-service).

 

Others words under consideration include the ever popular yet amorphous ‘solution’, 3G and SEO.

 

In 2007 IPOD, Flash, Cookie, Nano and Cookie lead the list with SOA as the most confusing acronym

 

In 2005, HTTP, VoIP, Megapixel, Plasma, & WORM were the leading buzzwords.

 

The analysis was completed using GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI), the proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the media and on the Internet.  The words are tracked in relation to frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.  This analysis was performed earlier this month.

 

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

 

For more information, call 1.925.367.7557, email info@GlobalLanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

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For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.


TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings Fall 2008

First Internet-based College and University Rankings


Austin, Texas, USA.   September 19, 2008.   In an exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis of the nation’s colleges and universities, the Global Language Monitor  (www.LangaugeMonitor.com) has ranked the nation’s colleges and universities  according their appearance on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well in the global print and electronic media.   The rankings include Social Media.

“There are only three types of intellectual property in the US, and one of them is the trademark (or brand) which are intended to represent all the perceived attributes of a service – and institutions of higher education are no different,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst at GLM.  “Prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.  Our TrendTopper analysis is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large.”

The schools were also ranked according to ‘media momentum’ defined as having the largest change in media citations over the last year.

GLM used its proprietary Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) software for the TrendTopper Media Buzz Analysis.GLM used the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges.The schools were ranked according to their positions in early September, a mid-year snapshot, and used the last day of 2007 as the base.

Top Colleges:

Colorado bests Williams; Richmond, Middlebury, Wellesley follow

Bucknell, Amherst, Oberlin, Vassar, and Pomona in Top Ten

Top Colleges

1

Colorado College

2

Williams College

3

Richmond

4

Middlebury College

5

Wellesley College

6

Bucknell University

7

Amherst College

8

Oberlin College

9

Vassar College

10

Pomona College

11

Hamilton College

12

Union College

13

Swarthmore College

14

Colgate University

15

Bard College

16

Carleton College

17

Bowdoin College

18

Connecticut College

19

Colby College

20

US Naval Academy

21

Barnard College

22

US Military Academy

23

Bates College

24

Bryn Mawr College

25

Skidmore College

26

Gettysburg College

27

Davidson College

28

Mount Holyoke

29

Furman University

30

Lafayette College


College Momentum

Hamilton bests Pomona College; Skidmore, Bard, and Gettysburg follow

Sewanee, Furman, Colby, Connecticut College, and Colgate in Top Ten

Top Colleges, Momentum

1

Hamilton College

2

Pomona College

3

Skidmore College

4

Bard College

5

Gettysburg College

6

Sewanee

7

Furman University

8

Colby College

9

Connecticut College

10

Colgate University

11

Middlebury College

12

Claremont-McKenna

13

Carleton College

14

Whitman College

15

Trinity College

16

Richmond

17

Colorado College

18

Bates College

19

Wesleyan University

20

Harvey Mudd

Back to College Rankings Main Page

For more information, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@languagemonitor.com


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