Flashback: Gulf Oil Spill and Rise of ‘the Narrative’ in Politics

The Importance of  Tracking Evolving Narratives

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Gulf Oil Spill Vs. Katrina

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Obama vs. BP

The Lesson of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is the importance of controlling the narrative, since whoever wins of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill.

Austin, TX, June 02, 2010 (Updated May 24, 2014) — In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, there are now several differing story lines emerging from the Gulf Oil Spill. The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

Colleen Ross:  How Obama Lost Control of the Oil-Spill Narrative (CBC)

The Narratives emerging from this on-going (and slow-moving) disaster include: Obama was Slow to Respond – 95% of the social media conversations characterize the President Obama as ‘slow to respond’. Obama vs. BP: who’s in charge? — 52% see BP in charge of the spill. This may or may not be a political liability. Democrats need the blame assigned to BP; at the same time, Obama needs to be seen as in overall control of the disaster Worst environmental disaster ever – 42% see the current spill the worst environmental disaster ever. Federal Response — 57% see the Federal response using ‘poor’ or related keywords. Not a good month for the Feds; come to think of it, not a good year for the Feds. Katrina vs. Exxon Valdez – 61% make the comparison to the Exxon Valdez; about 39% compare the ongoing spill to the inundation of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

 

Biblical Prophecies Abound Once More — About 61% of all references involve the Bible. (Even Ted Turner has a theory how the oil spill might be a warning from God.) These are markedly different in tone than those used with Katrina where the references focused on apocalyptic imagery, End-of-the-World scenarios and doom. The Obama Style of Leadership – This is a close one 52% see Obama as ‘hand’s on’ leadership, 48% see ‘hand’s off’. Again, this is either positive or negative depending on your political bias.

Clarence Page:  How stories, true or not, drive politics

Ronald Reagan was seen as a ‘hand’s off’ president and that was considered good. Jimmy Carter was a ‘hand’s on’ type president and that was considered bad. “The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important to track since he who wins control of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “With the mid-term elections just five months away, and the prospect of the Gulf Oil Spill continuing unabated for months, control of the narrative is more important than ever.” The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters. The term ‘narrative’ in this sense is now appearing thousands of times in the global media on the Internet and blogosphere as well as throughout the world of social media, meaning the main streams of public opinion running in the media that needs to be fed, encouraged, diverted or influenced by any means possible. GLM recently announced The Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), in partnership with OpenConnect Systems of Dallas. The Healthcare NTI is the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™).

The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity. About the Global Language Monitor Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

Mandela Tops All Media Funerals, except John Paul II’s, Since 1997

No. 3 Ronald Reagan, No. 4 Princess Diana, No. 5 Michael Jackson, No. 6 Mother Teresa

Lady Thatcher Does Not Make the Cut

Ranked by TrendTopper Internet MediaBuzz

Austin, TX January, 2014 – In an exclusive analysis performed by the Global Language Monitor, the death of Nelson Mandela has topped those of all global influencers since 1997 with the exception of Pope John II, back in 2005.

“The emergence of Nelson Mandela into the No. 2 position is a testimony to the universal appeal of the man and his ideals,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and the Chief Word Analyst of GLM, “especially in a time when superficialities such as ‘twerking’ and the taking of so-called ‘selfies,’ seem to monopolize the airways in all their many forms.”

The re-emergence of John Paul II into the top spot also is seen by some as a worthy tribute to a man who helped end Communism’s grip over Eastern Europe and beyond.  The legacy of  Ronald Reagan presidency is viewed as transformational by both US political parties which can account for his continued high regard.

John Paul II and Nelson Mandela Lead the Lisrt
John Paul II and Nelson Mandela Lead the Lisrt

 

Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II

 

Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan

 

 

Princess Diana
Princess Diana

 

Mother Teresa
Mother Teresa

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nelson Mandela took the No. 2 spot, ahead of Ronald Reagan (2004), Princess Diana (1997), the mother of the future line of British Monarchy, including Prince William, his wife Kate and their new son, George, Michael Jackson (2009) the entertainment icon, Mother Teresa (1997).  

Lady Thatcher, the long-serving British Prime Minister who died last April just missed the survey cutoff. Read more

Obama and the null set narrative

Reprinted from The Hill, May 31, 2009

Obama and the null set narrative

By Paul JJ Payack

We have been analyzing the narrative of Barack Obama for some years now. In fact, we’ve tracked three differing narratives in the course of his campaign and the first term of his presidency. We’ve tracked the president’s highs (the “Yes we can!” Grant Park Speech, and others of soaring rhetoric), and his lows (the much more pedestrian Gulf Oil Spill effort).

We’ve been praised for our astute analysis, and condemned for announcing his premature political death. At the time, the Global Language Monitor’s analysis of the BP Oil Spill speech was actually pulled off CNN and replaced by a far milder critique. In retrospect, that speech was a harbinger of what was to come — Barack Obama bereft of Hope and Change.

Not that we didn’t have hints about of what was about to transpire. Consider the disposition of these “hope-and-change type” promises: (1) the immediate shutdown of Guantanamo, (2) the end of the K Street revolving door and (3) holding the bankers accountable for their part in the financial meltdown. How exactly do you make sense of these countervailing (or even contradictory) positions?

Obama and the null set narrative.

Now consider the president’s recent speech on U.S. defense policy: after ramping up the use of drones against “enemy combatants,” with hundreds of civilians deaths by the administration’s own estimate, he stands firmly against gratuitous drone strikes. After keeping Gitmo open for going on five years now, he will now do everything in his power to close it. How to make sense of these seemingly oppositional positions?

The null set narrative.

In the run-up to the 2010 midterms, we began to formally track the president’s narrative. We were curious to better understand how the word ‘narrative’ rose to be the No. 1 political buzzword at that time and what it meant to this presidency. Other terms frequently used to describe Obama at the time, included: detached, aloof, hands-off or professorial. Some took these words to be demeaning and/or insulting.

Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “The danger comes when politicians and their operatives essentially use ‘narrative’ … the version of the truth that they want us to believe even when they don’t believe it.”

Since his reelection last November, we have remained silent on the subject — awaiting the second term narrative to emerge. With the recent series of crises, scandals and/or events, we now are, indeed, witnessing this new narrative: the null set narrative.

Consider, if you will, the current plight of one Jay Carney.

It is always interesting how one’s attributes can be used to praise or condemn depending on the narrative in which they are described.

However, this is a narrative that can fit around any news, story or scandal; more to the point, it is completely irrelevant to the words ensconced within it. Any words, anytime, anywhere. This is the narrative of choice for the administration at this point in time.

And now detached, aloof, and hands-off are the favored phrases in this administration’s null set narrative.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/the-administration/302749-obama-and-the-null-set-narrative#ixzz2UuzupYr7

 

2013 Major Golf Championships Ranked by Internet Media Buzz

British Open No. 1 by the wide margin, Master’s No. 2

 

In Analysis ‘The Players’ Ranks higher than the PGA

 

Biggest Problem:  Nicklaus adds three Majors (to 21), Woods adds only one (to 15).

Austin, Texas. May 11, 2013. (Updated)  Open Championship has been declared the Top Golf Major by Internet Media Buzz, according to an analysis using Global Language Monitor’s Sports Brand Affiliation Index (S-BAI).  

One major point of resistance:  By elevating the Players to Major Status means Nicklaus adds three Majors to his total (to 21), while Woods adds only one (to 15).
The S-BAI analysis compared the strength of affiliation of each of the currently recognized events (The Masters, The US Open, The Open Championship or British Open and the PGA Championship) to the concept of ‘major championship’.  GLM then added the Players Championship for comparison with the four recognized events.  In an associated finding, the Players Championship has entered into the top ranks of the golfing world as one of the sport’s major championship events or Majors.  In fact, the Players’ Championship is in a virtual tie with the US Open for third.
There are now five Majors by MediaBuzz Concensus
There are now five Majors by MediaBuzz Consensus
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The Open Championship’s S-Brand Affiliation Index (147.59) was followed by the Masters at 106.62.  The US Open and Players Championships finished in a virtual tie for third at 90.74 and 90.17, respectively.  The Open Championship scored nearly twice as high as the PGA Championship (79.40).
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Ranklng the Golf Majors by Sports BAI 
1.  The British Open 147.59
2.  The Masters  106.62
3.  The US Open  90.74
4.  The Players  90.17
5′  The PGA  79.40
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“After forty years, the Players Championship has earned its place among the Major Golf Championships,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.   “Forty years is certainly an excellent vantage point to judge its worthiness. And the data has spoken.”
Payack added,  “Since 1860 The Open is the championship against which all future Majors would be judged.  Now over one hundred and fifty-years later, we see that it towers above all others in the world of golf.”  
In the early to mid 20th century, the Majors were considered to be those tournaments won by Bobby Jones during his historic 1930 season:  the US and British Amateurs, the Open Championship and the US Open. Later Jones’ own tournament, the Masters, gained in importance as did the Western Open (considered a Major by many for a number of decades) as the British PGA fell from favor.  As recently as 1960 there was no official recognition of the Majors, as such.
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For this analysis, GLM employed proprietary ‘algorithmic methodologies’ such as the Brand Affiliation Index.  The BAI computes and details the relative brand equity of people, products or events based on the analysis of global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate assessment at any point in time.  To do so, GLM analyzes the billions of pages on the Internet, millions of blogs, the top 175,000 global print and electronic media, as well as Twitter and new social media sources, as they emerge.
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GLM will perform another analysis following the conclusion of the 2013 Majors.
About Global Language Monitor:  “We Tell the World What the Web is Thinking”
Founded in Silicon Valley, Austin, Texas-based GLM collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com


Obama: du candidat super star au président mal aimé


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La couverture de l’élection de Barack Obama a été sans commune mesure avec les élections présidentielles de 2000 et 2004. Jacques Portes explique pourquoi le président des Etats-Unis n’a pas réussi à transformer ce succès planétaire en atout au cours de son mandat. Extraits de “Obama, vers un deuxième mandat ?” (1/2).



Not the Thrilla in Manila, but Certainly Nasty in Nassau

Austin, TEXAS.  October 17, 2012.  The President Obama of yore (2008, that is) showed up at the debate  last night and so was hailed the victor.  In fact, the numbers show that it was not that Romney faltered.  He did not.  Rather it was the President who recovered from his first debate ‘debacle’ (as viewed by his strongest supporters).

The numbers reveal the story.  First, keep this number in mind:  7.4.  This is the grade level of Obama’s most widely hailed speech, the “Yes, We Can!” Grant Park victory speech.  ‘Yes, We Can!” is widely perceived as a classic to be enshrined in the American Oratory Hall of Fame along side Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream,” Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address,’ and Ronald Reagan’s “City on a Hill” speeches.

In the first Presidential debate, Obama’s grade level came in at 9.2.  For a debate, with all its give-and-take, interruptions, pauses and the like, that was a rather high number. A Town Hall meeting is definitely not the place for the  grandiloquent turn of phrase, especially when you are trying to woo the undecided citizens of the land with plain speakin’ — no matter how uncomfortable that might be.

We all told in sixth grade that a newspaper should be written at the sixth-grade level, which from the sixth-grade perspective  can be quite a challenge.  What this really translates to is short sentences, concise paragraphs, fewer polysyllabic words, and all written in active voice.

As an example, Joe Biden spoke at a sixth grade level (6.1) in the vice presidential debate and there were few who claimed the inability to understand Ol’ Joe.   (Unfortunately, these tests do not evaluate facial expressions.)  In last night’s debate , Obama scored 7.2 in the grade-level score, about 28% lower (and in this case better) than his first debate — and nearly identical to his Grant Park discourse.

Both Romney and Obama cut their used of passive voice nearly in half  from 6% to 4% and 3%, respectively.  Active voice, where the subject is the doer of the action, is always preferred over passive voice in political discourse since it can be used to avoid responsibility.  (‘Taxes were raised’ rather than ‘I raise raised the taxes.)

Finally, Obama’s reading ease score improved over 8% from 63.1 to 70.1; Romney’s remained a bit higher at 71.0.

In champion fights, the unwritten rule is that you never take the current champ’s crown away on — points unless the victory is overwhelming.  Last night the President showed up to fight, and thus is awarded the victory on points.  So the Presidential Debate series now stands even at 0ne all, with the rubber (and deciding) match to take place next week.


The Final Narrative of Barack Obama

Austin, Texas.  October 9, 2012 —  The controversy swirling around Obama’s debate performance  completely misses the point.  For better or worse, this is it. Stripped of all pretension. Devoid of the catch phrases and the swoons. Minus the Hollywood glam. This is he. Barack Obama. The man, unadorned.  No longer do we see Obama through a glass dimly. Now we see him for who he is. This is neither to embellish nor dis-embellish the man. This is to see things for what they are and not what they ought — or ought not — to be.

At the Global Language Monitor we understand that life is not an exit poll; we cannot shape the reality of how we just voted. It is a zero-sum thing, a binary action, a one or a zero, a yes or a no. In the same manner we have tracked the narrative of Barack Obama the preceding five years, stripped of all adornment, searching for the reality that was all too frequently, standing right before us, actually in our midst, if only we had the will to open our eyes to see.

Of course we have unabashedly published our findings along the way but at that time our findings seemed a bit out-of-step, as indeed they were. Out-of-step with the perceived reality, but in step with reality as it was. Unlike most of life, a new president is graced with a honeymoon period, when missteps are overlooked, forgotten, or forgiven.  This is not the ‘suspension of disbelief’  that allows us to enjoy a fantastical story in the cinema but rather a ‘suspension of self-interest,’ where we put aside our partisan differences and wait.  We wait for the cues and signals, both small and large, that will reveal the intentions, proclivities, and (dare I say it?) the character of the incumbent.

For some presidents this grace period is over nearly before it starts (Gerald Ford and George W. Bush come to mind).  For others, it lasts a bit longer (George H.W. Bush), and for others longer still (Ronald Reagan).    In the case of Barack Obama, the situation was markedly different.  Being a black man, most Americans wanted him to succeed precisely because he was a black man.  As a relative outsider, he was a welcome break from the recent past (and impending future) — Bush 41, Clinton 42, Bush 43, Clinton 44?

Being a newcomer, he was the classic tabula rasa, a blank slate upon which we could pour upon all our hopes and dreams.  And change?  Who on this planet did not want  change from the preceding eight years:  a divisive and disputed election, global terrorism and 9/11, two wars in the Middle East, a devastating tsunami, the inundation of one of America’s great cities, and to top it off, the global financial meltdown. All this being so, Barack Obama began his presidency with an extraordinarily large reservoir of good will.  Let’s call this reservoir the Hope and Change Quotient (HCQ).

During Obama’s first days in office, the nation was engulfed in ‘anger and rage’? GLM analyzed the situation back in February 2009 and found that what was being reported as ‘anger’ was actually ‘frustration,’ while what was being reported as ‘rage’ was actually ‘despair’, a sense of foreboding or impending doom. GLM followed this rather odd undercurrent during the earliest, most hopeful, days of the Obama administration. The results were striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Obama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in.  Some of the keywords showing heightened awareness were Abandoned, Despair, Desperation, and Fear — all appearing in the media with double digit increases over the pre-election period.   This was perhaps an abberation we thought, but as we moved forward, the pattern continued unabated.

We saw a turning point with the Gulf Oil Spill speech.  This was the opportunity to show the world how a US President would properly respond to a major crisis threatening the Gulf Coast, the ecosystem, and the forces of nature and the evil of Man (an arrogant CEO from Central casting, BP, Halliburton, and a 24×7 ‘Spill Cam’ spewing forth colorful filth, worthy of  a Dreamworks 3-D treatment.   And what did we get?  We got what we had been measuring for the preceding two years:  Obama 2.0, with an academic-sounding speech detailing a broad plan for an alternative-energy future and few specifics, and little of the hell-and-brimstone his followers had hope for.  

By now it was becoming apparent for all to see.   This was a changed and changing man, at least how he revealed himself publicly through speech.  By time the 2010 Mid-Terms delivered their ‘shellacking’ the transformation was nearly complete.   With a few noteworthy exceptions, such as his Tuscon eulogy,which ranked among his best, the President has appeared less-and-less engaged, more-and-more distant.

In July we noted that the top political buzzwords were telling a far different story than either campaign was presenting to the American people.  Our analysis found that Bush was clearly assigned responsibility for the so-called Great Recession, while Obama was responsibility for the economy’s current condition, just as concern over Bain Capital and the ‘war against women’ were of less and little concern respectively.  In other words, the American people saw the issues as if the virulent political ads of both parties did not exist.  In contrast ‘Still believe the American Dream’  was No. 5 and ‘Disappointment in Obama Administration’ was No. 6.

At the same time, the Hope and Change Quotient has nearly been depleted, this being the normal course near the end of every president’s first term in recent memory.   The President has finally been vetted.  We now know the man, his strengths, weaknesses, and his proclivities.  This is not to say that he will not win in his bid for re-election.  But this is to say, that for better or worse, this is it.

This is the final narrative of Barack Obama.

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GLM used NarrativeTracker Technology in this study. NarrativeTracker is based on the global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what any audience is saying about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, the top global print and electronic media, as well as new media sources as they emerge.

Paul JJ Payack is the president and Chief Word Analysts of Austin-based Global Language Monitor.


Changing Your Vocabulary – The Power Of Words

Words don’t come easy to you? It probably depends on the people you are talking to. You will have a completely different speech in front of your mother, spouse, child, employer or employees, business partners, or in front of an entire audience you are trying to persuade to do something and so on. But no matter whom you would be addressing, you cannot recognize the extraordinary power of words. They are our means of expressing our feelings, desires, discontents, fears, frustrations, and the list can go on. Words also help us easily share our life experiences with others – and specialists recommend you completely change your vocabulary so you can actually interfere with the quality of your life – in a positive manner.

 

Words Are The Expression Of Our Thoughts And Feelings

The words you use to express a certain mood or feelings as a result of a certain life experience will eventually define your behavior. Some people might feel angry while others might express their feelings as similar to the state of disappointment – while having been exposed to the precise same stimulus. These word expressions will then influence the behaviors of the respective individuals. Feeling angry might make some people feel a lot more powerful and help them better cope with certain situations. In the meanwhile, people who were simply annoyed by the same event have used this approach in order to avoid getting too upset and lose total their control.

 

Transformational Vocabulary – How It Can Change Your Life

The term “transformational vocabulary” is therefore used to refer to those words that are connected to every life experience we go through these specific words used to describe a certain experience will then reach the stage of defining that experience, turning into a whole new one. In order to make some important changes into your life, you will have the chance to make full use of the transformational vocabulary. You will get to improve the future course of your actions by changing the way you express your feelings; you might be feeling sad or depressed, but instead you could say you are feeling mildly discontent or annoyed by something that has triggered your feelings. Instead of going up to someone and telling them you feel worried about the turnout of a certain event, you could use the phrase “I am a little concerned” and start to notice the amazingly positive results. You are allowed to use positive exaggeration to describe your not so great mood – and your brain will soon start to believe what you are saying. Say you are feeling excellent rather that “pretty good” – always choose your words with extreme carefulness and you will soon start to notice the results.  

Go online and read more about transformational vocabulary and look at Australia's gambling portal online at eonlinecasino.org while you are at it. Discover the fresh reviews, latest recommendations, tutorials, casino tools, mobile offers and many more. Think positively and use positive adjectives to describe your gambling style and you will soon start to notice a huge difference in your balance as well.  

 

London Edges New York for Top 2012 Global Fashion Capital

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Ninth Annual Ranking Now Includes Fifty-five Cities

September 6, 2012,  New York and Austin, Texas.   London has been crowned the Top Global Fashion Capital, edging out New York for the second year in a row, according to the Global Language Monitor’s annual ranking of the Top Fifty Fashion Capitals.  London and New York were followed by Barcelona, Paris and Madrid.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Rome, Sao Paulo, Milano, Los Angeles, and Berlin.

“London’s two-year run has been has been propelled by two rather extraordinary circumstances:  the emergence of the former Kate Middleton as a top fashion icon and the recent completion of what have been hailed as an extremely successful Summer Olympics,” said Bekka Payack, Manhattan-based Fashion Director of GLM.  “In recognition of the significance and growth of regional capitals with their distinctive styles and contributions to the fashion industry, GLM expanded the list to some fifty-five cities on five continents.”

Top movers on the plus side included Antwerp (+33), Caracas (+27), Johannesburg (+23), and Sao Paulo (+18).  Top movers on the down side include Mexico City        (-25), Toronto (-19), Moscow (-17), Chicago (-14), and Mumbai (-14), attesting to the heightened global competition.  Newcomers to this year’s analysis were Vancouver (31),  Seoul (34), Boston (44),  Houston (49), and St Petersburg, Russia (51).

Prior to London’s two year reign, New York had reclaimed the crown from Milan.  Previous to this, New York had been the top fashion capital for five years running, taking the crown from Paris.
The 2012 Top Global Fashion Capitals, with Rank, Previous Year’s Rank, and commentary:
1.   London (1) – Competitors stymied by Kate Middleton and now the hugely successful Summer Olympics.
2.   New York (2)– That toddling town is waiting in the wings for London to stumble.
3.   Barcelona (7) — Iberia rules with two fashion capitals in the Top Five.
4.   Paris (3)–  Topped ‘haute couture’ category, of course.
5.   Madrid (12)– Making a strong move toward the top.
6.   Rome (13)– Edging Milano this time out.
7.   Sao Paulo (25) — The Queen of Latin America, again.
8.   Milano (4) — Slipping a few spots, but never for long.
9.   Los Angeles (5) — The City of Angels strengthening its hold as a true fashion capital.
10.   Berlin (10) — Remains among the elite — and deservedly so.
11.   Antwerp (44) — A surprising large climb in a very short time (up 33 spots).
12.   Hong Kong (6) — Tops in Asia, though down six year over year.
13.   Buenos Aires (20) — Moving steadily upward.
14.   Bali (21) — Steady climb attests to it being more than just swimwear.
15.   Sydney (11) — Remains near the top, a few steps ahead of Melbourne, as is its wont.
16.   Florence (31) — A big move for Firenza (up 15).
17.   Rio de Janeiro (23) — Building toward the 2016 Summer Games.
18.   Johannesburg (41) — Jo-burg breaks into the Top Twenty.
19.   Singapore (8) — Trailing  Hong Kong but leading Tokyo and Shanghai.
20.   Tokyo  (9) — No longer the No, 5 to the Top Four, competition is aglow in Asia.
21.   Melbourne (17) — Still strong, still a few steps behind Sydney.
22.   Shanghai (14) — A thriving fashion center in a tough competitive arena.
23.   Caracas (50) — Tremendous upward movement for a seminal fashion center.
24.   Las Vegas (16) — Follow the money, and the money and the stars flow to Vegas.
25.   Monaco (15) — The principality is firmly ensconced in the European fashion firmament.
26.   Santiago (30) — A solid No. 5 in Latin America.
27.  Amsterdam (19) — Creative, original and a bit outre.
28.   Dubai (27) — A steady force in the mid-East ready to bloom further.
29.   Bangkok (32) — Struggling to gain ground in the region.
30.   Copenhagen (29) — Keeping pace with (and a bit ahead of) Stockholm.
31.   Vancouver (Debut) — Solid debut from this newcomer from the Pacific Northwest.
32.   Stockholm (28) — The Capital of Scandinavia’s influence is beginning to transcend its regional roots.
33.   Krakow (47) — A scrappy player wielding a surprising amount of influence.
34.   Seoul (Debut) — Korean fashion has now gained a foothold on the world scene.
35.   Moscow (18) — A bold and growing presence despite a stumble in the current analysis.
36.   Frankfurt (43) — Carving out its own space in Berlin’s towering shadow.
37.  Vienna (35) — Insight into 21st c. fashion emerging from ancient imperial venues.
38.  Mumbai (24) — Still leading New Delhi (now by 10 spots) to dominate the Subcontinent.
39.   Miami (26) — The fashion world beginning to understand Miami is more than swimwear.
40.  Abu Dhabi (42) — A steady climb backed by deep pockets.
41.   San Francisco (38) — A rising yet iconoclastic star.
42.   Austin (40) — Famous for its ‘Mash Up’ teams, the city propels its unique style forward.
43.   Warsaw (33) — Particularly influential in Central Europe.
44.   Boston (Debut) — Can New England deliver fashion to the world? Apparently so.
45.   Prague (48) —  A firm foundation in interpreting the traditional and the classic.
46.   Dallas (37) — Outdistances Houston to settle the local score.
47.   Mexico City (22) — Slips some twenty-five spots since the last report.
48.   New Delhi (39) — Striving for relevance on the global stage.
49.   Houston (Debut) — Big, bold and a city to watch.
50.   Chicago (36) – City of the Big Shoulders stretching out toward word-class fashion.
51.   St. Petersburg (Debut) — The former imperial capital making strides on the global fashion scene.
52.  Montreal (49) — Eclipsed by the debut of Vancouver but still a formidable force.
53.  Toronto (34) —  Nipped by its francophone neighbor to the North.
54.  Cape Town (46) — Though Jo-burg won the latest duel, Cape Town surely has plans.
55.  Atlanta (45) — Gaining an international reputation for its bold accents.
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This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

 

Top Fashion Capitals by Region:

Europe (14):  London,  Barcelona, Paris, Madrid, Rome, Milano, Berlin, Antwerp, Florence, Monaco, Amsterdam,  Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Frankfurt.

Middle and Eastern Europe (6):  Krakow, Moscow, Vienna, Warsaw, Prague, and St Petersburg.

North America (13):  New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Vancouver, San Francisco, Austin, Boston, Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Montreal, Toronto, and Atlanta.

Asia (6):  Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Shanghai, Bangkok, and Seoul.

Subcontinent (2):  Mumbai, New Delhi,

Oceania (3):  Bali, Sydney, and Melbourne.

Latin America (6):  Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro,  Caracas, Santiago, and Mexico City.

Middle East and Africa (4):  Dubai, Johannesburg, Abu Dhabi, and Cape Town.

The world fashion trade  is estimated to be over three trillion USD.


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