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Final Hollywood Award of the Season — Top words from Hollywood (HollyWords)

American Sniper and Selma Take Top Prizes

Twelfth Annual Survey

The Year in Film as Reflected in the English Language

Austin, Texas, March 9, 2015.   ‘Your call’ from American Sniper has been named the Top HollyWords of the Year by the Global Language Monitor in its twelfth annual  Internet MediaBuzz Survey.  These were followed by ‘Edmund Pettus’ from Selma, and ‘disappearing yesterdays’ from Alice, “Life doesn’t give you bumpers.” from Boyhood, and ‘best and whitest’ from the awards ceremony itself rounded out the top five.

American Sniper 1

Each year, GLM announces the words after the Oscars at the conclusion of the motion picture awards season. The 87th Annual Academy Awards ceremony was held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, February 22, 2014.  Neil Patrick Harris was the host for the first time, to generally mixed reviews.

“Words from American Sniper and Selma took top honors in a year of taunt scripts and memorable quips” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor.  “The films this year spanned an exceptionally wide span of topics from the inner workings of the mind to the farthest reaches of outer space.

Selma

The Top Hollywords of the 2014 season with commentary follow.

Rank / Word or Phrase / Commentary

  1. ‘Your call.” (American Sniper) — Chris Kyle’s ultimate dilemma that he faced hundreds of times ..
  2. Edmund Pettus  (Selma) — Bridge named after a Confederate General and Klan leader, now an iconic symbol of hope and redemption.
  3. Disappearing Yesterdays (Still Alice) — Alice’s great fear of not knowing which yesterdays would be deleted and which preserved.
  4. “Life doesn’t give you bumpers.” (Boyhood) — Mason Sr’s advice to son during a teachable moment at the bowling alley.
  5. ‘Hollywood’s best and whitest’ (87th Annual Academy Awards Ceremony) — Neil Patrick Harris in a faux slip of the tongue at the Awards Ceremony.
  6. That little spark of madness  (Mrs. Doubtfire, Dead Poets Society, Good Morning, VietNam, etc.) — Robin Williams’ work all demonstrated that little spark.
  7. ‘It Depends’ — (Grand Budapest Hotel) — H. Gustave opines that “you can say that about most anything, ‘it depends’. Of course it depends” in a telling moment of obfuscation.
  8. String Theory (The Theory of Everything) — Hawkings never did complete his theory of everything.  String theory is his closest attempt, thus far..
  9. Turing Machine (The Imitation Game) — Alan Turing’s theoretical computing machine serves as an idealized model for mathematical calculation.
  10. “You’re no actor, you’re a celebrity.” (Birdman) — This can be said of any number of one-time stars of the Hollywood firmament, any number of whom were present the Oscars ceremony..
  11. ‘Good Job’ (Whiplash) — Evidently, there are no two words in the English language more harmful to those pursuing excellence.
  12. Plan B (Interstellar) — The secret plan to implement after the supposed demise of the entire human race.

Previous Top Hollyword Winners include:

  • 2013 The F-Word , prevalent in scores of films.
  • 2012  ‘Emancipation — (Lincoln, Django, Argo) — Webster says ‘to free from restraint, control, or the power of another’.
  • 2011  ‘Silence’ – Silent movies, (the Artist), a wife’s silence (Descendants), a father’s silence (Extremely Loud), silence among the trenches of WWI (Warhorse).
  • 2010  ‘Grit’ — firmness, pluck, gritty, stubborn, indomitable spirit, courageous, and brave perseverance.
  • 2009  ‘Pandora’ —  from Avatar
  • 2008  ‘Jai Ho!” —  Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi from Slumdog Millionaire
  • 2007  “Call it, Friendo” —  from No Country for Old Men
  • 2006  “High Five!!! It’s sexy time!”  — from Borat!
  • 2005  ‘Brokeback’ — from Brokeback Mountain
  • 2004 ‘Pinot’ — from Sideways
  • 2003 ‘Wardrobe malfunction’ — Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson from Super Bowl XXXVIII

Methodology.  Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

 

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