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Ebola-tracker Global Survey: No Hysteria but Plenty of Fear (and Concern)

This is one of a series; for the entire series go here:

Definition of Hysteria and Panic

Little evidence of ‘hysteria,’ ‘hysterical thinking,’ or ‘panic’

October 27, 2014,  Austin, TEXAS — In a TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis of top global print and electronic media the Global Language Monitor (GLM) has found little evidence of ‘hysteria,’ ‘hysterical thinking,’ or ‘panic’ but an overabundance of the words ‘fear’ and ‘concern’.  The survey was completed on October 21, 2014

“Since President Obama issued his warning on ‘hysteria and hysterical thinking’, the media have taken up the cry, yet there is little evidence of any such reactions actually occurring.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief of GLM. “However, we are seeing a very large uptick in references to ‘fear’ and ‘concern’ — and for good reason since nearly every projection on the course of the epidemic by the World Health Organization, the CDC, and the Administration have proven false.  The American people are seeing a large disparity between what they are being told — and what they see with their own eyes”.

The top findings of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Study:

  • Neither the words hysteria nor panic were much in evidence during GLM’s 10-day study — except in the media that were cautioning against succumbing to them.
  • The New York Times and Washington Post each mentioned hysteria nearly ten times more than the Dallas Morning News, which sat at the epicenter of the Ebola Outbreak.

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WHO: “No evidence that the epidemic is being brought under control…”

This is one of a series; for the entire series go here:

 

Update: Dallas Healthcare Worker Following Full CDC-recommended Procedures Tests Positive for Ebola….

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October 12, 2014 (Updated) Global Language Monitor’s Ebola Tracker, a Language and Logic (LAL) assessment the various announcements, updates and projections issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), the CDC, and the UN focuses on the WHO: Ebola Response Roadmap Situation Report issued on 8 October 2014.

Key Points of the WHO Update:

  1. The past week has seen a continuation of recent trends.
  2. The situation in West Africa continues to deteriorate.
  3. Widespread and persistent transmission of EVD continues.
  4. The reported fall in the number of new cases in Liberia over the past three weeks is unlikely to be genuine.
  5. Troubling, is the deterioration in the ability of overwhelmed responders to record accurate epidemiological data.
  6. There is no evidence that the EVD epidemic is being brought under control.

Read more

Flashback: Malala Yousafzai Named Internet’s Top Name for 2012 …

Malala Yousafzai won the Top Internet Name award in 2012
Malala Yousafzai won GLM’s Top Internet Name award in 2012

Read about it here.

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and here.

NDTV

or here.

usatoday

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Ebola-Tracker: Many Targets and Deadlines Announced by WHO, UN, and CDC Pass Without Comment

This is one of a series; for the entire series go here:

 

“A medical blitzkrieg across national boundaries”

Ebola-Tracker: Many Targets and Deadlines Announced by WHO and CDC Pass Without Comment

October 2, 2014  Global Language Monitor’s Ebola Tracker, a Language and Logic (LAL) assessment the various announcements, updates and projections issued by the World Health Organization (WHO), the CDC, and the UN are passing without comment.

“The fact that the targets and deadlines are passing is as much a cause for alarm as the fact of EVD spreading in a medical blitzkrieg across national boundaries,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “In particular, the comments from the the various agencies about their confidence level of halting, containing, and/or controlling the epidemic appear to be losing credibility.”

Key Dates:

April 1: Medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) warns the epidemic’s spread is “unprecedented.” But a World Health Organization (WHO) spokesman calls it “relatively small still.”

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Ebola Worst Case Scenario: 1 Billion cases by August 2015?

This is one of a series; for the entire series go here:

Worst Case Scenario: 1 Billion cases by August 2015

September 24, 2014  Global Language Monitor’s Ebola Tracker’s analysis from the CDC’s Worst Case Scenario: 1 Billion cases by August 1, 2015 with a greater than 50% fatality rate.  The current fatality rate is about 71% according to the CDC.  This is a basic mathematical extrapolation from Atlanta’s Centers for Disease Control (CDC) September 23rd projections that considered Worst Case Scenarios of between 550,000 and 1.4 Million Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) victims by the middle of January.

Key Points:

1.  The current outbreak has already claimed more lives that all previous outbreaks combined.

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Ebola-Tracker: Language and Logic (LAL)-based Assessment of the Ebola Pandemic

This is one of a series; for the entire series go here:

The Ebola-tracker is the Big Data language analysis of the official numbers and updates released by the World Health Organization (and the CDC) and the conversations surrounding the numbers by various  experts in various fields.. GLM’s Analysis is a Language and Logic (LAL)-based assessment of the WHO and CDC numbers.  When projections come from other organizations, they will be noted as such.  As a further cautionary note or caveat, when dealing with real-time numbers and numbers analysis, projections can change in real time.  Since Our purpose is to analyze the 2014 West African Ebola outbreak objectively, without biases or blinders of any sort.  In particular, the goal is to examine the latest thinking on the course, the geographic extent,  and the time to-contain the pandemic.

Ebola Virus Disease EVD
Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)

Key Points: 

1.  The current pandemic has already claimed more lives that all previous outbreaks combined.

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‘Climate Change’ tops Earth Day Words that Changed the World

Since 1970 a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language.  

New Words and New ‘Senses’ of Old Words

Austin, Texas, Earth Week, April 2014 —  Climate Change has topped the Global Language Monitor’s Earth Day Words that Changed the World analysis.  Climate Change outpaced Sustainable and Global Warming in the third annual analysis of Global English.  

Since the first Earth Day was celebrated as an ‘environmental teach-in’ on April 22, 1970 a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language.   The Global Language Monitor has determined the top new words and new ‘senses’ of old words that have been engendered  since that first Earth Day in 1970.  The words are ranked by order of present-day usage in the English-speaking world.  The study was updated the second week of April 2014.

“As the term ‘Climate Change’ suggests, the issues that the first Earth Day helped bring to the fore have had an evermore profound effect on global culture  — and the English language,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “The issues these words represent are now viewed as essential to human progress, and even survival.

The words analyzed are but the most profound examples of a movement that has been gaining momentum at least since the 1960s.

GLM used their Narrative Tracker methodologies to determine and rank the Earth Day words.  The criteria included determining which words have had an impact on the environmental movement and/or were influential in its growth.  

The Top Words Engendered by Earth Day and the Environmental Movement since 1970 are listed below.

Rank/Word/Last Year’s Rank/Definition    

1.  Climate change (4) — Now used twice as much as the term ‘global warming’.  Originally favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily dues to long-term atmospheric cycles.

2. Sustainable (3) — The ability to create self-replicating systems that can persist over time.  Sustainable was GLM’s word of the year in 2006.Green (1) — Practices that are in harmony with the environment.

3. Global warming (11) — Favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily due to human influence.  (Compare Climate  Change, above).

4. Eco- (as a prefix) (5) — Shorthand for ‘ecological’; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).  

5.  Vegan (9) — Those who abstain from eating animal or dairy products, often avoiding any products made from animals (such as leather or gelatin); coined in 1944 in the UK by Donald Watson. 

6.  Ecology (7) — the relations of beings to each other and their environment; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).  

7.  Recycle (8) — The re-using of materials once viewed as waste.  

8.  Hybrid (car) (22) — Cars that use a mixture of technologies to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels.  

9.  Locavore (10) — Thinking globally while eating locally.

10. Emissions (6) —  In this sense, gases and particles sent out into the atmosphere through industrial production, automobiles, etc.; from the Late Latin emittere, to send out of.  

11. Xeriscape (14) — Literally ‘dry landscaping’; using natural elements in a desert landscape for yard enhancement.   Begging the question:  must every yard resemble an English Manor?

12.  Natural (food) (21) — Food grown with without artificial ingredients (such as color)  and produced in a manner similar to that used in a well-stocked home kitchen.

13.  Renewable energy (2) — Energy derived from solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and similar ‘sustainable’ sources.

14.  Organic food (18) — Food grown or produced without synthetic fertilizers, insecticides, hormones, irradiation and genetic modification.  

15.  Carbon footprint (19) — The total amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions generate by a human activity.  Driving a late-model, fuel-efficient car emits about 6 pounds of CO2 every ten miles.  Term first used in 1980.   Alternative definition — Your life reduced to the a series of equations on energy (carbon) consumption.

16.  Biodegradable (15) — Organic material that decays naturally in a relatively short time.

17. Greenhouse gas (GHG) (16) — Any gas emitted into the atmosphere that trap heat (e.g., CO2); without them the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans; with an excess the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans.18. Solar power (12) — Energy derived by harnessing the sun’s electromagnetic radiation.

19. Post-consumer (waste) (20) — Material that can be used as a resource to build new products.

20. Emissions (6) — In this sense, gases and particles sent out into the atmosphere through industrial production, automobiles, etc.; from the Late Latin emittere, to send out of.

21.  Greenwash (25) — Highlighting aspects of a product that may or appear to be favorable to the environment in order to re-shape its brand image.

22.  Biomass (13) — Material derived from plants that can be used as a renewable energy source.

23.  Biofuels (24) — Finally, we are reaching a break-even point with sugar based biofuels in Brazil.

24.  Greenhouse Effect (23) — The heating of the Earth’s surface in a fashion similar to a greenhouse, with GHG acting as glass windows that trap heat.  The result of the increased emission of CO2 and other GHGs.

25.  Carbon trading (26) — Trading, in effect, the rights to pollute between different manufacturers in the global marketplace.

26.   Free-range (27) — The animal has been raised with access to the outside; not the same as ‘free roaming’.

27.  Save a Tree! (28) — One of the first rallying cries of the Environmental Movement.  Unfortunately, replacing a renewable resource with one made of petroleum created ecological problems of its own. 

For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor collected data from the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge.  

 About Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. In 2003, GLM first coined the term ‘ephemeral data’ as an attribute of ever-expanding Big Data. GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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British Open widens lead over the Masters as Golf’s Top Major

Third Annual Ranking of Tournament Brand Equity

The BAI helps determine the value of an event

In Analysis ‘The Players’ Ranks higher than the PGA, Again

Tour Championship by Coca-Cola Registers Less than 1% of Internet MediaBuzz

 

Austin, Texas. the Masters Weekend, April 2014 — The Open Championship has widened it lead over the Masters as the Top Golf Major in the Global Language Monitor’s third annual ranking.

Golf Majors 2014

The analysis compared the strength of affiliation of each of the currently recognized events (The Masters, The US Open, The Open Championship or British Open and the PGA Championship) to the concept of ‘major championship’.  GLM then added the Players Championship and the end-of-the-season Tour Championship for comparison with the four recognized events.  The Players Championship has solidified its position as the ‘Stealth Major’ again placing third in the ranking, ahead of the PGA Championship.  To judge the impact of  the Tour Championship, GLM put it into the mix but later eliminated it for consideration after it did not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion.

Read More on a Comparison of the Careers of Tiger Woods and Mickey Mantle

When compared to the 2013 analysis, the Open Championship gained some 40 points, the Masters and US Open remained strong at last year’s levels , while both the Players and PGA Championships finished with lower BAI scores.  In 2013 the PGA finished about ten points behind the Players, while in 2014 the PGA lagged behind by about twenty points as measured by the BAI.

The BAI is an important metric to advertisers and sponsors since it helps determine the value of an event.

Golf Majors 2014 Change

 

Of course, by elevating the Players to Major Status, Jack Nicklaus would add three Major victories to his total (to 21), while Tiger Woods would add only one (to 15).

“Since 1860 The Open is the championship against which all future Majors would be judged.  Now over one hundred and fifty-years later, we see that it is strengthening both its reputation and significance,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.  Furthermore, it actually moved forward to a commanding lead in the ranking of Golf’s Major Championship.  In spite of its elite field and generous purse, the end-of-season Tour Championship did not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion.”

 

History

In the early to mid 20th century, the Majors were considered to be those tournaments won by Bobby Jones during his historic 1930 season:  the US and British Amateurs, the Open Championship and the US Open. Later Jones’ own tournament, the Masters, gained in importance as did the Western Open (considered a Major by many for a number of decades) as the British PGA fell from favor.  As recently as 1960 there was no official recognition of the Majors, as such.

Methodology

GLM ranks Golf’s Major Championships by Internet Media Buzz.  For this analysis, GLM employed its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index.  The BAI computes and details the relative brand equity of people, products or events based on the analysis of global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate assessment at any point in time. To do so, GLM analyzes the billions of pages on the Internet, millions of blogs, the top 300,000 global print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources, as they emerge.

About Global Language Monitor:  “How will the Global Trends Impact Your World?”
Founded in Silicon Valley, Austin, Texas-based GLM collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com

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OK: 175 years old and going strong

Most Recognized Word on the Planet:  OK or O.K. or Okay

March 23, 2014.  This week is the 175th anniversary of one of the great moments in the English Language:  the old Boston Post newspaper printing the phrase ‘oll korrect’, in a bit of humorous wordplay back in 1839.

Earlier this afternoon, we performed a simple Google search for the word; the search returned some 1,200,000,000 references to OK.   Not bad for a word no one is quite sure how to spell.

OK is now widely heard wherever one sets foot on the planet.

U.S. President Martin Van Buren (A.D. 1837–1841) was born in Old Kinderhook, New York. His nickname, Old Kinderhook, was incorporated into his re-election campaign slogan in 1840 (“Old Kinderhook is O.K.”).  O.K. Democratic Clubs sprung up around the young nation. Van Buren was a founding member of the Democratic Party. (He was overwhelmingly defeated by the Whigs in his re-election attempt.)

Alternative derivations, since disproven, suggested that OK was from the Greek phrase ola kala for ‘all is well’ used in the shipping industry. Another, actually favored by president Woodrow Wilson, was that OK was derived from the Native American language of the Choctaw ‘okeh’.

However, what is well-documented is that the U.S. Presidential Election of 1840 catalyzed OK’s already growing usage and subsequent global expansion during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  After World War II, US hegemony cemented its global propagation.

As English became the world’s first, true global language with some 1.83 billion speakers, dominance of the software of the Microsoft Corporation further embedded it everyday use on the Internet.  Some 80% of its computer programs that are ‘localized’ into native languages use the English word OK to assert completion or assent.

For good measure, the successful completion of a server response on the World Wide Web (of which there are billions every second) is defined as OK.

Now with the proliferation of social media, the word itself has further evolved with its shortening to the single letter, k.

OK?

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