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Early GLM (yourDictionary.com) History

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YDC Appoints of Paul J.J. Payack as President

In the News

Media Alert:

yourDictionary.com Announces Appointment of Paul J.J. Payack as President and Chief Executive Officer
Strengthens Management Team of the Premier Global Portal for Language on the Worldwide WebJuly 26, 2000, DANVILLE, CA, — yourDictionary.com (YDC), the most comprehensive, and authoritative portal for language, and language-related products and services on the worldwide web today announced that Paul J.J. Payack has accepted the position of President and Chief Executive Officer. Payack joins YDC from Legato Systems, Inc., the Palo Alto, CA-based leader in storage management software where he served as Vice President, Worldwide Marketing.”We are quite pleased to have an executive of Paul’s experience joining yourDictionary.com,” said George Wilson, Chairman and founder, “Paul brings to the YDC team an unparalleled set of experience and hands-on expertise in both the technical and consumer marketplaces.”Previous to Legato, Payack has served as a senior marketing and communications executive for some of the industry’s technology leaders, including Intelliguard Software, the Network Systems Corporation, The Dun & Bradstreet Coorperation, and Unisys. Payack began his career in Massachusett’s ‘Route 128 Technology Corridor’ at Apollo Computer, Inc., Wang Laboratories, and the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC).”It will be a pleasure working with Paul,” said Dr. Robert Beard, the Chief Linguistic Officer and C.T.O of yourDictionary.com. “Paul not only possesses the technological and management skill set required, but as a published author and student of language has an appreciation for the written word that is absolutely essential to helping YDC adhere to its original mission of a truly global resource for the world’s linguistic communities.””YDC is poised to extend its leadership position as the world’s most comprehensive, and authoritative language portal,” said Payack, “We will build on our significant strengths, which include:

  • the widest and deepest set of dictionaries on the web (more than 1500 dictionaries representing more than 230 languages),
  • the authority and academic rigor exemplified by our Advisory Council of Experts (ACE), composed of some of the world’s most distinguished linguists, who provide indispensable guidance in the development, acquisition, and maintenance of the dictionaries under their purview, and
  • the Endangered Language Repository (ELR), which provides a sanctuary to help preserve the hundreds of languages that are threatened with extinction and the distinct heritages each represents.”

Payack is a noted lecturer on high tech Marketing and Communications, speaking at industry forums, universities, and corporations, such as BusinessWeek’s Digital Economy and CIO’s Perspectives, the University of Texas, Babson College, and the University of Massachusetts, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the Hughes Aircraft unit of General Motors, and many others.

A published author, his work has appeared in dozens of collections, journals and reviews, including New Letters, the Paris Review, Boulevard and Creative Computing. A graduate of Harvard University, Payack currently resides with his wife and children in Danville, CA.

About yourDictionary.com
yourDictionary.com (YDC) was founded in 1999 to provide the world’s most comprehensive, and authoritative portal for language, and language-related products and services on the world wide web. yourDictionary.com’s immediate predecessor, The Web of Online Dictionaries, was launched in 1995 by Dr. Robert Beard at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania, as a research tool for the world’s linguistic community. (Dr. Beard is now the Chief Linguistics Officer and CTO of yourDictionary.com.) A truly global portal, yourDictionary.com has been visited by more than 6 million users.

yourDictionary.com has been recognized as the web’s pre-eminent language portal by dozens of organizations around the world. Most recently, yourDictionary.com was selected as the “Best of the Web for Reference” by Forbes magazine. Other recent accolades have come from The New Yorker, the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Washington Post, USA Today, and Yahoo Internet Life, among many others.

The Advisory Council of Experts
The yourDictionary.com Advisory Council of Experts (ACE) is comprised of some two dozen of the most renowned figures in the field. The distinguished members of the Council help ensure the integrity of their respective areas of linguistic specialization, as well as provide indispensable guidance in the development, acquisition, and maintenance of the dictionaries under their purview. Members of the Council also contribute original articles to the YDC Library.

Preserving the World’s Linguistic Heritage
Of the seven thousand languages and dialects spoken on the planet, experts have concluded that more than half are endangered and actually headed toward extinction by the end of the century. To help preserve the languages and the distinct heritage each represents, yourDictionary.com has created theEndangered Language Repository (ELR). The purpose of the ELR is to provide a sanctuary for these languages on the worldwide web, to better enable access by both scholars and interested laypersons.

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Dictionary Publishers Going Digital (NYTimes)

In the News

 

yourDictionary.com Announces Purchase of ‘Web of Online Dictionaries’

In the News

Media Alert:

yourDictionary.com Announces Purchase of ‘Web of Online Dictionaries’
Creates the Premier Global Portal for Language on the Worldwide Web

January 3, 2000, King of Prussia, PA, — yourDictionary.com (YDC), world’s most complete, and authoritative portal for language, and language-related products and services on the world wide web, today announced the acquisition of the renowned ‘Web of Online Dictionaries’.The Web of Online Dictionaries (WOD) is the worldwide web’s first global, language resources. The Web of Online Dictionaries was created in 1995 by Dr. Robert Beard as a research tool for the world’s linguistic community. Dr. Beard is director, emeritus, of the Linguistics Program at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. The Web of Online Dictionaries the WOD has been visited by some 6,000,000 users over the last five years.The WOD has distinguished itself, winning scores of awards and accolades from around the world. Most recently, it has been cited as being a leader in the field by such diverse entities as The New Yorker, the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Washington Post, and Yahoo Internet Life, among many others.

Recently USA Today said, “If the Web of On-line Dictionaries doesn’t help, the word may not have been created yet. It’s that extensive …” and The Wall Street Journal called it the, “single starting point for users with questions about words in virtually any language.”

“This acquisition propels yourDictionary.com to the forefront of web-based language resources on the planet,” said George Wilson, Chairman of yourDictionary.com, Inc. “We are pleased to be associated with this web pioneer and long-time leader.”

In addition, yourDictionary.com also announced that Prof. Robert Beard has accepted the positions of Chief Linguistics Officer (CLO) as well as Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for YDC. “The WOD is a culmination of many years effort working with language and linguistic experts from around the world,” said Dr. Beard, “I am pleased that my work will serve as the cornerstone of this vastly expanded global resource.”

Since it founding in 1999, yourDictionary.com has endeavored to become the world’s leading web-based, on-line dictionary, as well as the most complete, and authoritative portal for language, and language-related products and services on the WorldWide Web.

The distinguished members of the yourDictionary.com Advisory Council of Experts (ACE) help ensure the integrity of their respective areas of linguistic specialization, as well as provide indispensable guidance in the development, acquisition, and maintenance of the dictionaries under their purview.

In addition, yourDictionary.com has created the Endangered Language Repository (ELR) to provide a sanctuary for the world’s endangered languages and the distinct heritages each represent. Some half of the world’s 6,000 languages are said to be endangered.

About yourDictionary.com
yourDictionary.com (YDC) was founded in 1999 to provide the world’s most complete, and authoritative portal for language, and language-related products and services on the world wide web. yourDictionary.com’s immediate predecessor, The Web of Online Dictionaries, was launched in 1995 by Dr. Robert Beard at Bucknell University in Pennsylvania, as a research tool for the world’s linguistic community. (Dr. Beard is now the Chief Linguistics Officer and CTO of yourDictionary.com.) A truly global portal, yourDictionary.com has been visited by more than 6 million users.

yourDictionary.com has been recognized as the web’s pre-eminent language portal by dozens of organizations around the world. Most recently, yourDictionary.com was selected as the “Best of the Web for Reference” by Forbes magazine. Other recent accolades have come from The New Yorker, the BBC, the Chronicle of Higher Education, the Washington Post, USA Today, and Yahoo Internet Life, among many others.

The Advisory Council of Experts
The yourDictionary.com Advisory Council of Experts (ACE) is comprised of some two dozen of the most renowned figures in the field. The distinguished members of the Council help ensure the integrity of their respective areas of linguistic specialization, as well as provide indispensable guidance in the development, acquisition, and maintenance of the dictionaries under their purview. Members of the Council also contribute original articles to the YDC Library.

Preserving the World’s Linguistic Heritage
Of the six thousand languages spoken on the planet, nearly half are said to be endangered. To help preserve the languages and the distinct heritages each represents, yourDictionary.com has created the Endangered Language Repository (ELR). The purpose of the ELR is to provide a sanctuary for these languages on the worldwide web, to better enable access by both scholars and interested laypersons.

Reproduced with permission from The New York Times

Dictionary Publishers Going Digital
A Low Margin Business Sees Profits on the Web

By David D. Kirkpatricklogomachy ( n. an argument about words) is brewing on the Web.August 21, 2000 — Houghton Mifflin plans to publish the fourth edition of the American Heritage dictionary next month, the volume’s first major overhaul in eight years. The new edition is full of changes sure to arouse lexicographers — color illustrations, notes on slang and a new appendix describing Semitic as well as Indo-European roots.But what has the publisher most excited is happening outside the covers, as Houghton Mifflin hustles to sell electronic versions of its dictionary for inclusion in other companies’ software, Web sites and digital publications.Houghton Mifflin is not alone. Its major rivals — most notably Merriam-Webster and Microsoft’s year-old Encarta dictionary — are all stepping up their digital dictionary efforts to tap an increasingly lucrative market, setting up a business contest that philologists say will also affect the way Americans use English.Electronic novels may be making headlines these days, but electronic dictionaries are actually making money. At Houghton Mifflin, digital dictionary licensing is expected to account for more than $1 million in profit this year, more than 10 percent of the earnings from the company’s trade and reference division, according to Wendy Strothman, the division’s publisher.Stifled for years by low margins and flat sales, publishers are salivating over digital licensing as a new source of revenue growth and promoting new features like audible pronunciations. But word scholars worry that the new pressures of the online market may end up favoring well-connected or well-positioned dictionaries — some sniffingly cite Microsoft’s Encarta — over more authoritative lexicons.Many lexicographers initially saw the advent of the Internet as a terrific new tool, especially because it made possible electronic texts of nearly infinite length. That impulse inspired the Oxford University Press, for example, to revise its 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary for the first time since its completion in 1928.

A new online version of the O.E.D. is available to subscribers for fees starting at $550 a year. Researchers are posting the revisions and additions online in stages, and they expect to finish the alphabet in about 40 volumes around 2010.

Oxford University Press has not yet decided if it will publish a new printed version, too, said Jesse Sheidlower, its American editor. The Internet also enables rival dictionary compilers to share a common digital “corpus,” or archive of usage samples. Inspired by the British National Corpus that was established in 1993, a group of publishers and linguists based in New York is raising financing and gathering material to build an American National Corpus of 100 million words in texts of all kinds, including transcript, newspapers and novels.

But the American National Corpus has yet to win help from many of the nation’s big dictionary publishers, who would stand to lose the advantage of their own proprietary archives. “We think we have our needs pretty well served,” said John Morse, president and publisher of the Merriam-Webster, the United States’s oldest and best-selling dictionary, with an archive of more than 15 million citations.

The World Wide Web is also a gold mine for linguistic research. For the first time, scholars can trace the infancy of new words as they bubble up from narrow subcultures through online discussion groups and eventually into general use, said Michael Adams, a professor at Albright College in Pennsylvania and editor of the journal Dictionaries.

Professor Adams recently published a study of new coinages from the television show “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” — “slayage” and many other -age formations, for example — tracking their progress from teenage fans’ Web sites to magazines like Mademoiselle. He argues that Buffy has also spawned novel uses of “much,” as in “pathetic much?,” “morbid much?” or “Having issues much?”

But Microsoft’s Encarta dictionary, billed as the first lexicon for the digital age, has some lexicographers shaking their heads, partly because they worry that it could indeed be the dictionary of the future.

The idea for the Encarta was born in the early 1990’s, when Nigel Newton, chief executive of the British publishing house Bloomsbury, wrote a letter to William H. Gates, proposing to create a dictionary of “world English.”

The Web is seen as a gold mine for linguistic research.

At the time, Microsoft was paying Houghton Mifflin to license online versions of its American Heritage dictionary to use in Microsoft’s spell-checking software and to bundle with its Encarta digital encyclopedia. Why pay Houghton Mifflin, Mr. Newton suggested, when the two companies could build a wordbook of their own? Bloomsbury developed the dictionary, selling international digital rights to Microsoft and the American rights to Holtzbrinck’s St. Martins Press.

The new venture faced long odds in bookstores. Most American consumers traditionally want a red dictionary with the name Webster on the cover — as in Merriam-Webster, Random House’s Webster’s, and IDG Books’s Webster’s New World, says John Sargent, president of Holtzbrinck’s American operations.

But the new dictionary’s publishers are betting that Microsoft’s commanding position in the software market can make Encarta’s name and black cover even more ubiquitous. “Our thinking was that, given its use in Microsoft software, the Encarta brand would over time become the leading reference brand,” Mr. Sargent said. The electronic version is available for sale with some Microsoft software or for free at www.encarta.com.

The possibility that Encarta will, in fact, become the new Webster is precisely what is bothering many linguists. In a forthcoming review in Dictionaries, Sidney I. Landau, author of “Dictionaries: The Art & Craft of Lexicography,” roundly pans Encarta’s “cumbersome, repetitious and inconsistent style” and especially what he sees as its excessive political correctness.

The word “Indian,” an example Mr. Landau notes, is described in other dictionaries as potentially insensitive but also widely used among Native Americans and inextricably woven into terms like “Indian summer.” The Encarta issues a blanket condemnation, calling the term “offensive” several times. In a few cases, the Encarta Web site even interrupts the viewer with a “language advisory” before even displaying a potentially offensive word, as if it were a lewd movie. Such labels, Mr. Landau says, reverse most lexicographers’ understanding of their job—to report in neutral terms the changing shape of the language.

Professor Adams, another Encarta critic, worries that Encarta will succeed despite its flaws and at the expense of its rivals. “The problem is that if they don’t put out the best possible dictionary, because of the access they have through the Microsoft software, they could very well depress the sales of the four major publishers,” said Mr. Adams, who has worked as a consultant to American Heritage. “Good dictionaries would disappear, and we would be left with an inferior dictionary.”

Microsoft and its partners dismiss the criticism as predictable nitpicking. Every new or different dictionary has met a similar response from professional lexicographers, said Mr. Sargent of Holtzbrinck.

Houghton Mifflin, Microsoft’s previous digital dictionary supplier, was the publisher with the most to lose from the Encarta dictionary, which Microsoft this year began using instead of the American Heritage. But Ms. Strothman of Houghton Mifflin said that new digital licensing deals had “more than made up for the loss of that revenue stream.”

She said Houghton Mifflin prepares customized versions of its digital database for a variety of clients, seeking to capitalize on the recent interest in electronic publishing by embedding its dictionary in electronic books or reading software. Readers can look up any word with a click. When half a million fans downloaded copies of Stephen King’s electronic novella “Riding the Bullet” in March, for example, some of the software programs for displaying it included a digital version of the American Heritage dictionary, and Houghton Mifflin received a small royalty on each. This fall, the digital publisher netLibrary will begin including American Heritage dictionaries with its e-books, paying a sliding scale fee for its use. (Microsoft’s new Reader software, however, includes a version of Encarta.)

A number of Web sites, including www.dictionary.com, have even paid Houghton Mifflin for use of its digital dictionary to provide free spellings and definitions on the Web, hoping to attract viewers and sell advertising. “They are welcome to do that, but our content costs us money and we want to get paid for it,” Ms. Strothman said. “What puzzles me is why our competitors put their own dictionaries up on the Web for free.” Houghton Mifflin sells its dictionary on CD-ROM, but does not put it on a Web site of its own.

That position has cost the company some business. Paul J. J. Payack, chief executive of the newly formed company yourDictionary.com, initially favored licensing American Heritage, he says, because he liked its etymologies and simple definitions. But he did not like Houghton Mifflin’s licensing-only strategy. He wanted a dictionary that would bolster his brand by building its own, so he struck a deal with Merriam-Webster.

Merriam-Webster has taken a radically different tack from American Heritage, giving its dictionary away for free on its own Web site (www.m-w.com) while at the same time trying to license it to whomever it could, including America Online and the hand-held computer maker Franklin Electronic Publishers, among others. Recently, it also managed to strike a deal to display its Web site on Palm devices.

“Unlike Houghton Mifflin, we are just a dictionary publisher,” said Mr. Morse of Merriam-Webster. “We aim mainly to promote the brand.”

The main Merriam-Webster Web site and a related site for children offer word games and offers a free word-of-the-day e-mail with usage and etymology tips. Mr. Morse said the site was now getting about 20 million page views a month, at a rate of about 50,000 look-ups an hour during the middle of the day.

Merriam-Webster also tracks which words users look up for guidance in making revisions. This month’s hot word: “chutzpah,” spurred by news coverage of vice presidential candidate Joseph I. Lieberman.

But not all lexicographers are happy about the proliferation of Merriam-Webster’s definitions online, either. “The Merriam-Webster is fantastic but least suited for most people who use it,” said Jesse Sheidlower, the American editor of the Oxford English Dictionary. “Its definitions are much more complicated and more difficult than the other major dictionaries. The other dictionaries are accurate, and you can use them without going nuts.”

Misc. V

Politics 2016: Fighting the Last War, Again

Vietnam 2
It used to be said, that old soldiers are always fighting the last war. That they are trained in the techniques and strategies that were acquired on battlefields past, and the old lessons don’t always apply to the current fields of battle. In 2016, this lesson does not apply to the American Military who deal in contingencies of every imaginable stripe, but rather to the political class who seem to be impervious to the will (and pulse) of the American electorate.
Rather than trying to harness the anger beneath the surface, the political elite is attempting to ignore that which is in plain sight to in order to keep the control they have exerted over the electorate.

 

On the Republican side, senior leadership is arguing amongst themselves about how to stop Trump, the unannointed usurper.

On the Democratic side, there is some comfort in the fact that the party’s unelected, non-represetative ‘Super Delagates’ can direct the vote to whom they please, in a new (and ingenious) kind of voter suppression

While arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Syrian Civil War becomes ever more ominous,, which now has resulted in more than a quarter of a million civilizian deaths while ex-patriating millions of rufugees to an EU, which can’t keep up with the continuing inflow.
And, again, while arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Islamic State (ISIL or ISIS) captures huge swaths of Iraqi land, and an ever enlarging footprint in the Middle East (and now North Africa), and declares the existence a new Caliphate, which by tradition, all Muslims are ordered to support.
The same can be said for our political leadership in the current election cycle where the political reality in 2016 is in direct conflict with the will of their own people.

Not a day goes by without any number of screeching headlines referring to the Republican or Democratic leadership as well as the elite opinion makers attempting to stop the current political ‘revolutions’ and return to the more managable election landscape of elections past.

 

While Democratic and Republican Party leadership are busy fighting the last war (or eve worse the last several wars), the American electorate has been busy moving forward with eyes squarely on the current battle, writing headlines of their own.

Somehow it appears as if enough Americans have had their fill of the status quo — and are moving onto the new fields of battle, daring to lead the elites into a hazy, ill-defined political future.

Examples of Fighting the Last War:

  • Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders – OK, so they might actually win their party’s nominations. Obviously, this is a result of a series of major mis-judgements of Party Leadership of both parties. Stop managing expectations and start managing reality.
  • Deaths by Opioids — Every year, there are now as many deaths from Opioids in the US as deaths from guns. And this is affecting all demographics. Where is the outcry!?
  • The 1% — No matter how you define the elite, the facts remain that an ever larger percentage of the nation’s wealth is flowing to those at the top. And it is all too obvious that the banks that are ‘too large to fail’ are also ‘too large for jail’.
  • Middle East — Problems in the Middle East do not spring from George W. Bush, but rather from the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) and the creation of boundaries of convenience for the British Protectorate. Fighting the Last War (Iraq 2003) here has led to the ongoing struggles in Iraq, the deaths of hundreds of thousands in Syria, and the spread of the Islamic State.
  • Manufacturing Jobs — The focus on ‘bringing back’ lost manufacturing jobs — In numbers employed, the Service Sector topped the Manufacturing Sector in the 1970s. Since World War II the Manufacturing Sector has declined from about a quarter of total in percentage of total employment to just below 10% currently. Fortunately, the sector’s productivity has exploded and the US still produces about 20% of the world’s manufacturing output. But those millions of jobs (including three or four million shipped to China since the turn of the century) are not coming back.
  • Unemployment Under 5% — All Americans are quite aware that the employment number is not right. Does it include those who’ve given up looking for work? No. Is the largest prison population in the world included in the number? No. We all know those who are working two (or more) jobs to maintain their previous standards of living. Are the underemployed counted the same as the ‘fully employed’? Yes.
  • Focus on Identity politics — There is ample evidence that the younger population is not as focused on ‘identity politics’ as do the party’s elite. The current electorate focuses less on ‘race’ and identity politics, and more on the reality of income inequality, as well as disparities in opportunities, educational attainment, and employment.

 

Conclusion:

What is sure: the current electorate is delivering a resounding No Vote, a stunning vote of No Confidence to the current leadership of both parties. A good portion of the American public has decided that they are tired of past and present policy initiatives, and the ever smaller focus on slights delivered to each other each, than their concerns with a world teeming with war, terrorism, and economic inequality.

 

Flashback: Gulf Oil Spill and Rise of ‘the Narrative’ in Politics

The Importance of Tracking Evolving Narratives

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Gulf Oil Spill Vs. Katrina

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Obama vs. BP

The Lesson of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is the importance of controlling the narrative, since whoever wins of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital — for good or ill.

Austin, TX, June 02, 2010 (Updated May 24, 2014) — In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor’s NarrativeTracker™, there are now several differing story lines emerging from the Gulf Oil Spill. The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet, as well as the leading print and electronic databases.

Colleen Ross: How Obama Lost Control of the Oil-Spill Narrative (CBC)

The Narratives emerging from this on-going (and slow-moving) disaster include: Obama was Slow to Respond – 95% of the social media conversations characterize the President Obama as ‘slow to respond’. Obama vs. BP: who’s in charge? — 52% see BP in charge of the spill. This may or may not be a political liability. Democrats need the blame assigned to BP; at the same time, Obama needs to be seen as in overall control of the disaster Worst environmental disaster ever – 42% see the current spill the worst environmental disaster ever. Federal Response — 57% see the Federal response using ‘poor’ or related keywords. Not a good month for the Feds; come to think of it, not a good year for the Feds. Katrina vs. Exxon Valdez – 61% make the comparison to the Exxon Valdez; about 39% compare the ongoing spill to the inundation of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina.

 

Biblical Prophecies Abound Once More — About 61% of all references involve the Bible. (Even Ted Turner has a theory how the oil spill might be a warning from God.) These are markedly different in tone than those used with Katrina where the references focused on apocalyptic imagery, End-of-the-World scenarios and doom. The Obama Style of Leadership – This is a close one 52% see Obama as ‘hand’s on’ leadership, 48% see ‘hand’s off’. Again, this is either positive or negative depending on your political bias.

Clarence Page: How stories, true or not, drive politics

Ronald Reagan was seen as a ‘hand’s off’ president and that was considered good. Jimmy Carter was a ‘hand’s on’ type president and that was considered bad. “The development of the Gulf Oil Spill narrative is important to track since he who wins control of the narrative, controls the story in terms of political capital – for good or ill,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “With the mid-term elections just five months away, and the prospect of the Gulf Oil Spill continuing unabated for months, control of the narrative is more important than ever.” The rise of the narrative can render positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

The NarrativeTracker is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters. The term ‘narrative’ in this sense is now appearing thousands of times in the global media on the Internet and blogosphere as well as throughout the world of social media, meaning the main streams of public opinion running in the media that needs to be fed, encouraged, diverted or influenced by any means possible. GLM recently announced The Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ (NTI™), in partnership with OpenConnect Systems of Dallas. The Healthcare NTI is the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. The NarrativeTracker is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ (PQI™).

The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity. About the Global Language Monitor Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

 

Obama and the null set narrative

Reprinted from The Hill, May 31, 2009

Obama and the null set narrative

By Paul JJ Payack

We have been analyzing the narrative of Barack Obama for some years now. In fact, we’ve tracked three differing narratives in the course of his campaign and the first term of his presidency. We’ve tracked the president’s highs (the “Yes we can!” Grant Park Speech, and others of soaring rhetoric), and his lows (the much more pedestrian Gulf Oil Spill effort).

We’ve been praised for our astute analysis, and condemned for announcing his premature political death. At the time, the Global Language Monitor’s analysis of the BP Oil Spill speech was actually pulled off CNN and replaced by a far milder critique. In retrospect, that speech was a harbinger of what was to come — Barack Obama bereft of Hope and Change.

Not that we didn’t have hints about of what was about to transpire. Consider the disposition of these “hope-and-change type” promises: (1) the immediate shutdown of Guantanamo, (2) the end of the K Street revolving door and (3) holding the bankers accountable for their part in the financial meltdown. How exactly do you make sense of these countervailing (or even contradictory) positions?

Obama and the null set narrative.

Now consider the president’s recent speech on U.S. defense policy: after ramping up the use of drones against “enemy combatants,” with hundreds of civilians deaths by the administration’s own estimate, he stands firmly against gratuitous drone strikes. After keeping Gitmo open for going on five years now, he will now do everything in his power to close it. How to make sense of these seemingly oppositional positions?

The null set narrative.

In the run-up to the 2010 midterms, we began to formally track the president’s narrative. We were curious to better understand how the word ‘narrative’ rose to be the No. 1 political buzzword at that time and what it meant to this presidency. Other terms frequently used to describe Obama at the time, included: detached, aloof, hands-off or professorial. Some took these words to be demeaning and/or insulting.

Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune wrote, “The danger comes when politicians and their operatives essentially use ‘narrative’ … the version of the truth that they want us to believe even when they don’t believe it.”

Since his reelection last November, we have remained silent on the subject — awaiting the second term narrative to emerge. With the recent series of crises, scandals and/or events, we now are, indeed, witnessing this new narrative: the null set narrative.

Consider, if you will, the current plight of one Jay Carney.

It is always interesting how one’s attributes can be used to praise or condemn depending on the narrative in which they are described.

However, this is a narrative that can fit around any news, story or scandal; more to the point, it is completely irrelevant to the words ensconced within it. Any words, anytime, anywhere. This is the narrative of choice for the administration at this point in time.

And now detached, aloof, and hands-off are the favored phrases in this administration’s null set narrative.

Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/the-administration/302749-obama-and-the-null-set-narrative#ixzz2UuzupYr7

 

Obama: du candidat super star au président mal aimé

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La couverture de l’élection de Barack Obama a été sans commune mesure avec les élections présidentielles de 2000 et 2004. Jacques Portes explique pourquoi le président des Etats-Unis n’a pas réussi à transformer ce succès planétaire en atout au cours de son mandat. Extraits de “Obama, vers un deuxième mandat ?” (1/2).

 

Third Debate: a Reverse ‘Rope-a-Hope’

Exclusive Analysis

Austin, Texas. October 23 — The President chose to go on the attack in the Third Presidential Debate last night; in a sort of reverse ‘rope-a-Hope’ strategy the challenger attempted to defuse the pummeling by not quite praising the President’s efforts but, rather, agreeing with him whenever it was even remotely possible. This was the Obama of 2008, though the pounding spoke less of hope and change & more of a desperate attempt to please his base.

For all the chest-pounding on the President’s side of the aisle, er, Spin Room, the fact remained that Obama was back in familiar territory of long sentences, a relatively high usage of the passive voice, with a lower reading ease, and attendant higher grade level scores. Once again, the higher use of the passive voice often is interpreted as attempting to evade ownership or shift responsibility. Obama’s use of passive was more than double his use in the Second Debate. Typically, a bellicose style does not win over the undecided, who seek to be more reassured than shouted at.

Romney’s numbers were remarkably similar during all three debates, which apparently reflects his steady, controlled, ‘gee willikers’-type personality, with a direct, if quaint, speaking style. This is a style of moderate-length, declarative sentences, with little use of the passive voice, and short, direct, and easy to understand words.

Both candidates were attempting to sound (and look) presidential and it was apparent that the second task was quite wearying. Holding back on Biden-esque smirks and Al Gore-ish disdain, feigning interest while keeping their talking points in mind, looked to take a singular toll.

Now the question remains if the Third Debate, along with a narrow win in the Second, is enough to unwind the havoc wrought by Debate No. 1, which introduced Mitt 2.0 (or even 3.0) upon an unsuspecting American electorate. Indeed, who knew that Mr. Romney could even affect let alone reverse his apparent off-course trajectory in a 90-minute span? Seldom has the course of a major American campaign change in a shorter amount of time. And seldom has a foregone conclusion, Obama winning an electoral landslide, collapsed as suddenly.

 

Not the Thrilla in Manila, but Certainly Nasty in Nassau

Austin, TEXAS. October 17, 2012. The President Obama of yore (2008, that is) showed up at the debate last night and so was hailed the victor. In fact, the numbers show that it was not that Romney faltered. He did not. Rather it was the President who recovered from his first debate ‘debacle’ (as viewed by his strongest supporters).

The numbers reveal the story. First, keep this number in mind: 7.4. This is the grade level of Obama’s most widely hailed speech, the “Yes, We Can!” Grant Park victory speech. ‘Yes, We Can!” is widely perceived as a classic to be enshrined in the American Oratory Hall of Fame along side Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream,” Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address,’ and Ronald Reagan’s “City on a Hill” speeches.

In the first Presidential debate, Obama’s grade level came in at 9.2. For a debate, with all its give-and-take, interruptions, pauses and the like, that was a rather high number. A Town Hall meeting is definitely not the place for the grandiloquent turn of phrase, especially when you are trying to woo the undecided citizens of the land with plain speakin’ — no matter how uncomfortable that might be.

We all told in sixth grade that a newspaper should be written at the sixth-grade level, which from the sixth-grade perspective can be quite a challenge. What this really translates to is short sentences, concise paragraphs, fewer polysyllabic words, and all written in active voice.

As an example, Joe Biden spoke at a sixth grade level (6.1) in the vice presidential debate and there were few who claimed the inability to understand Ol’ Joe. (Unfortunately, these tests do not evaluate facial expressions.) In last night’s debate , Obama scored 7.2 in the grade-level score, about 28% lower (and in this case better) than his first debate — and nearly identical to his Grant Park discourse.

Both Romney and Obama cut their used of passive voice nearly in half from 6% to 4% and 3%, respectively. Active voice, where the subject is the doer of the action, is always preferred over passive voice in political discourse since it can be used to avoid responsibility. (‘Taxes were raised’ rather than ‘I raise raised the taxes.)

Finally, Obama’s reading ease score improved over 8% from 63.1 to 70.1; Romney’s remained a bit higher at 71.0.

In champion fights, the unwritten rule is that you never take the current champ’s crown away on — points unless the victory is overwhelming. Last night the President showed up to fight, and thus is awarded the victory on points. So the Presidential Debate series now stands even at 0ne all, with the rubber (and deciding) match to take place next week.

 

With Obama’s structural lead, debate stakes couldn’t be higher

October 16, Austin, Texas — (Opinion) We have seen this all before in politics, in the board room, on the ball fields, and in life. The person at the top of the pecking order makes a misstep, seemingly minor, and then cascades into something major, and then cascades further still until it become calamitous — unless it can be stopped in time. Time is of the essence here. It must be squelched immediately, or sooner. And hopefully sooner still.

Perhaps it is ironic that one of the best examples was that of Mitt Romney’s Dad, George, in his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination back in the late ’60s. George Romney claimed that he had been ‘brainwashed’ by the U.S. military and diplomatic personnel on a visit to Vietnnam. “Romney brainwashed’ screamed the headlines. And that was all it took for his campaign to unravel.

Even a youthful observer could understand that Romney was using what in literature is known as synecdoche, where a part is used to represent something far larger. I have since seen this repeated scores of times in political confrontations of all types most recently in the Arab Spring. Today, we label this kind of support ‘shallow’ where a significant number of supporters are ready to abandon their candidate at the first instance that a viable alternative arises.

Could this explain what we saw in the aftermath of the first debate? It seems unlikely, but nevertheless could explain the remarkable transformation of the presidential contest we are now witnessing. I should note that it also doesn’t mean the the president will lose on November 6th. His lead is structural, both in terms of constituents as well as geography. There are many paths available for Obama to construct a electoral majority. For Romney the options are far fewer. Even if Romney’s momentum continues to build, there is a possibility of Romney eking out a slim victory in the popular vote, while losing by a far larger margin in the Electoral College.

The stakes in Tuesday’s debate could not be higher. For Romney the task is to build upon his momentum, for Obama it is to halt Romney in his tracks before he loses complete control of the race.

Paul JJ Payack, president, Global Language Monitor

A slightly different version of this article appeared on TheHill.com on October 15, 2012.

 

Malarkey Vs. Adorkable: The Vice Presidential Debate

Two words can be used to distill the essence of Thursday Night’s Vice Presidential Debate: Malarkey Vs. Adorkable.

On the one hand you have Joe Biden in familiar territory talking, interrupting, spinning, smiling feverishly to help the Democrats regain control of the political narrative after the widely perceived misteps of the president in the first Presidential Debate; on the other you have Paul Ryan, the wunder wonk, attempting to demonstrate 1) that he is NOT Sarah Palin, and 2) that he is more than simply a policy wonk and has the attendant seriousness, intelligence and skill set necessary to sit a heartbeat away from the presidency. Both succeeded in their appointed tasks.

Though Biden used the term ‘malarkey’ to describe Ryan’s debate performance, it was Biden who more closely typified the concept of ‘malarkey’ (bluster). Ryan did not stray too far from his policy wonk persona, but was fortunate that dorks, nerds and wonks are now in fashion. Hence the term ‘adorkable’ for ‘adorable dork’. In fact, The Global Language Monitor had named ‘adorkable’ as the Top Television Word of the Year just a month or so ago.

In terms of language usage, Biden used about 30% more passive voice than Ryan. Many believe that the passive voice is used to shade the truth, opposed to simple declarative sentences. Ryan and Biden both were relatively easy to understand according to the standardized algorithms coming in at 69.4 and 72.6 on the Reading Ease Scale. As for Grade Level, Ryan came in at 6.6, while Biden scored a 6.1. For comparison, Obama scored a 9.2 and Romney a 6.8 in their first debate.

(As a side note, Biden’s score (6.1) was the lowest ever recorded in a debate, surpassing Ross Perot’s previous low of 6.3).

 

The Final Narrative of Barack Obama

Austin, Texas. October 9, 2012 — The controversy swirling around Obama’s debate performance completely misses the point. For better or worse, this is it. Stripped of all pretension. Devoid of the catch phrases and the swoons. Minus the Hollywood glam. This is he. Barack Obama. The man, unadorned. No longer do we see Obama through a glass dimly. Now we see him for who he is. This is neither to embellish nor dis-embellish the man. This is to see things for what they are and not what they ought — or ought not — to be.

At the Global Language Monitor we understand that life is not an exit poll; we cannot shape the reality of how we just voted. It is a zero-sum thing, a binary action, a one or a zero, a yes or a no. In the same manner we have tracked the narrative of Barack Obama the preceding five years, stripped of all adornment, searching for the reality that was all too frequently, standing right before us, actually in our midst, if only we had the will to open our eyes to see.

Of course we have unabashedly published our findings along the way but at that time our findings seemed a bit out-of-step, as indeed they were. Out-of-step with the perceived reality, but in step with reality as it was. Unlike most of life, a new president is graced with a honeymoon period, when missteps are overlooked, forgotten, or forgiven. This is not the ‘suspension of disbelief’ that allows us to enjoy a fantastical story in the cinema but rather a ‘suspension of self-interest,’ where we put aside our partisan differences and wait. We wait for the cues and signals, both small and large, that will reveal the intentions, proclivities, and (dare I say it?) the character of the incumbent.

For some presidents this grace period is over nearly before it starts (Gerald Ford and George W. Bush come to mind). For others, it lasts a bit longer (George H.W. Bush), and for others longer still (Ronald Reagan). In the case of Barack Obama, the situation was markedly different. Being a black man, most Americans wanted him to succeed precisely because he was a black man. As a relative outsider, he was a welcome break from the recent past (and impending future) — Bush 41, Clinton 42, Bush 43, Clinton 44?

Being a newcomer, he was the classic tabula rasa, a blank slate upon which we could pour upon all our hopes and dreams. And change? Who on this planet did not want change from the preceding eight years: a divisive and disputed election, global terrorism and 9/11, two wars in the Middle East, a devastating tsunami, the inundation of one of America’s great cities, and to top it off, the global financial meltdown. All this being so, Barack Obama began his presidency with an extraordinarily large reservoir of good will. Let’s call this reservoir the Hope and Change Quotient (HCQ).

During Obama’s first days in office, the nation was engulfed in ‘anger and rage’? GLM analyzed the situation back in February 2009 and found that what was being reported as ‘anger’ was actually ‘frustration,’ while what was being reported as ‘rage’ was actually ‘despair’, a sense of foreboding or impending doom. GLM followed this rather odd undercurrent during the earliest, most hopeful, days of the Obama administration. The results were striking, especially, in contrast to the immense outpouring of global goodwill in response to the inauguration of Barack Obama, since the survey included the ten days immediately following Obama’s swearing in. Some of the keywords showing heightened awareness were Abandoned, Despair, Desperation, and Fear — all appearing in the media with double digit increases over the pre-election period. This was perhaps an abberation we thought, but as we moved forward, the pattern continued unabated.

We saw a turning point with the Gulf Oil Spill speech. This was the opportunity to show the world how a US President would properly respond to a major crisis threatening the Gulf Coast, the ecosystem, and the forces of nature and the evil of Man (an arrogant CEO from Central casting, BP, Halliburton, and a 24×7 ‘Spill Cam’ spewing forth colorful filth, worthy of a Dreamworks 3-D treatment. And what did we get? We got what we had been measuring for the preceding two years: Obama 2.0, with an academic-sounding speech detailing a broad plan for an alternative-energy future and few specifics, and little of the hell-and-brimstone his followers had hope for.

By now it was becoming apparent for all to see. This was a changed and changing man, at least how he revealed himself publicly through speech. By time the 2010 Mid-Terms delivered their ‘shellacking’ the transformation was nearly complete. With a few noteworthy exceptions, such as his Tuscon eulogy,which ranked among his best, the President has appeared less-and-less engaged, more-and-more distant.

In July we noted that the top political buzzwords were telling a far different story than either campaign was presenting to the American people. Our analysis found that Bush was clearly assigned responsibility for the so-called Great Recession, while Obama was responsibility for the economy’s current condition, just as concern over Bain Capital and the ‘war against women’ were of less and little concern respectively. In other words, the American people saw the issues as if the virulent political ads of both parties did not exist. In contrast ‘Still believe the American Dream’ was No. 5 and ‘Disappointment in Obama Administration’ was No. 6.

At the same time, the Hope and Change Quotient has nearly been depleted, this being the normal course near the end of every president’s first term in recent memory. The President has finally been vetted. We now know the man, his strengths, weaknesses, and his proclivities. This is not to say that he will not win in his bid for re-election. But this is to say, that for better or worse, this is it.

This is the final narrative of Barack Obama.

***

GLM used NarrativeTracker Technology in this study. NarrativeTracker is based on the global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture of what any audience is saying about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, the top global print and electronic media, as well as new media sources as they emerge.

Paul JJ Payack is the president and Chief Word Analysts of Austin-based Global Language Monitor

 

*******

Word ‘Christmas’ Stronger than ever in Global Media

Contrary to assumption that “Holiday season” pushing Christmas aside

Austin, TX December 23, 2008 (Update) – The Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) has found that contrary to the assumption that the word Christmas is being pushed aside by more secular or politically neutral terms, ‘Christmas’ is used over 600% more than ‘Holiday Season’ in the global media. GLM compared the use of Christmas along with that of ‘Holiday Season,’ ‘Xmas,’ Chanukah’ in a variety of spellings, and ‘Kwanzaa’ (see below for the various spellings of Chanukah).

Since the 2005 season, Christmas has been used in about 85% of all global print and electronic media citations [2008, 84.6%; 2007, 85.5%; 2006, 84.1%; 2005, 84.1%].

In the global media, Christmas accounted for about 84.6% of all citations with Holiday Season following at 12.6%, followed by Xmas (1.5%), Hanukah (0.9%) and Kwanzaa (0.3%). On the Internet, Christmas led with 80.8% followed by Xmas (10.6%), Holiday Season (5.1%), Hanukah (2.5%), and Kwanzaa (0.7%). Note: The X in the word Xmas actually represents the Greek letter CHI, the first two Letters in the name Christ.

Festivus, the fictional holiday created during the hit Seinfeld television series, and Wintervale, sometimes used as a politically neutral substitute for the Christmas season were also measured with negligible results.

GLM tracked the words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The analysis also measured the global print and electronic media on its own. The results follow

Global Media Percentage Internet Percentage
Christmas 84.6% Christmas 80.8%
Xmas 1.5% Xmas 10.6%
Holiday Season 12.6% Holiday Season 5.1%
Hannukah 0.9% Hannukah 2.5%
Kwanzaa 0.3% Kwanzaa 0.7%
Festivus 0.03% Festivus 0.1%
Wintervale 0.00% Wintervale 0.001%
Total 100.0% Total 100.0%

“We thought it would prove interesting to see how the holidays are actually represented in the global media,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “We were a bit surprised to see that the much discussed secularization of Christmas in the media was nowhere as widespread as speculated.”

Various Spellings of Chanukah

  • Chanuka
  • Chanukah (Most common in US)
  • Chanukkah
  • Channukah
  • Hanukah
  • Hannukah
  • Hanukkah
  • Hanuka
  • Hanukka
  • Hanaka
  • Haneka
  • Hanika
  • Khanukkah

Added 12/23/09 (thanks to Steven Teitel)

For more information, call +1.512.801.6823 or email info@languagemonitor.com

 

Top Politically Incorrect Words of 2007-2008

‘Nappy-Headed Ho’ Top Politically inCorrect Phrase for 2007 Closely Followed by ‘Ho-Ho-Ho’ and ‘Carbon Footprint Stomping’

 

Henderson ,NV . March 21, 2008. ‘Nappy-headed Ho,’’ closely followed by ‘Ho-Ho-Ho’ and ’Carbon Footprint Stomping’ top the list of the most egregious examples of politically inCorrect language found in 2007 by the Global Language Monitor in its annual global survey. This year’s list includes words and phrases from the US , the UK ,Australia , and China .

“It is no surprise that a ‘Nappy-headed Ho’ was selected as the Top Politically Incorrect word or phrase for 2007,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). “A year later that phrase is still ricocheting about the Internet even affecting Christmas-season Santas in Australia.” The list was nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.
The Top Politically Incorrect Terms and Phrases for previous years include:

  • 2006: Global Warming Denier
  • 2005: Misguided Criminals
  • 2004: Master/Slave computer jargon

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2007:

  1. Nappy-headed Ho’s – Radio personality Don Imus’ reference to the women on the Rutgers University championship basketball team. ‘Nappy’ is ultimately derived from the Anglo Saxon hnoppa for the ‘wooly substance on the surface of cloth’. Combined with the word ‘ho’ — a derogratory term for women, Imus’ comments led to an uproar in the media and ultimately led to his resignation.
    2. HoHoHo — Staffing company in Sydney suggesting to prospective Santas to re-phrase their traditional greeting of “ho, ho, ho” in favor of “ha, ha, ha” so as not be confused with American urban parlance, a derogatory term for women.
    3. Carbon footprint stomping – The movement to flaunt carbon-intensive activities such as driving Hummers and flying private jets; a reaction to the Green movement is the height of political inCorrectness.
    4. Year of the Pig Restrictions – Chinese State Television in Shanghai warns Nestle against Happy Pig New Year ads, foregoing thousands of years of Chinese Tradition, because it might inflame pork-shying minorities.
    5. Three Little Pigs – according to the BBC, A retelling of the three little pigs fairy tale, called Three Little Cowboy Builders, was excluded from award consideration because judges said that “ the use of pigs raises cultural issues”. It was also found to “alienate parts of the workforce (building trade): “Is it true that all builders are cowboys, builders get their work blown down, and builders are like pigs?”
    6. The ‘Race’ Card – Originally a printed card with information about a thoroughbred horse race, now used in 2008 Presidential campaign parlance as in ‘playing the race card’, meaning intentionally injecting issues of ethnicity into the campaign. The word ‘race’ is ultimately derived from the Old High German for lineage.
    7. “Obesity Is Socially Contagious” — That was the widely reported headline in the UCSD press release announcing the results of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that actually came to the opposite conclusion. One of the study’s authors made it worse by stating “It’s spread from person to person like a fashion or a germ … once it starts; it’s hard to stop it. It can spread like wildfire.”
    8. Fire-breathing Dragon – Lindsey Gardiner, a leading British children’s author of the popular Lola, Poppy and Max characters, was instructed to eliminate a fire-breathing dragon from her new book because publishers feared they could be sued under health and safety regulations.
    9. “Wucha dun did now?” — Handbook distributed a Houston school district police officer to enable the reader to speak “as if you just came out of the hood”.
    10. Gypsy skirt – The worldwide phenomenon of the gypsy, tiered or Boho skirt has a new name: Traveler’s Skirt, since police in Cornwall believed that the term ‘Gypsy Skirt’ might be considered offensive to this cultural minority.
    The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.
    GLM is moving its headquarters to Austin , Texas in the coming months.

 

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

The Top Politically inCorrect Words for 2006

 

The Top Politically inCorrect Words for 2006

 

 

Macaca, Global Warming Denier, Herstory and Flip Chart Top Annual List

 

San Diego, California (December 13, 2006) Macaca, Global Warming Denier, Herstory and Flip Chart top the list of the most egregious examples of politically correct language found in 2006 by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com) in its annual global survey.

“In 2006, the Political Correctness movement continued to gain momentum to the effect that many were unaware of the extent that it had inserted itself into ordinary English-language conversations,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over”.

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2006:

  1. Macaca – Might have changed the political balance of the US Senate, since George Allen’s (R-VA) utterance (which is an offensive slang term for Indians of the Sub-continent in the West Indies) surely has impacted his election bid.
  2. Global Warming Denier – Since there are those who now believe that climate changed has moved from scientific theory to dogma; there are now proposal that ‘global warming deniers’ be treated the same as ‘holocaust deniers:’ professional ostracism, belittlement, ridicule and, even, jail.
  3. Herstory for History – ‘Herstory’ again attempts to take the male element out of ‘HIS story’. Though there are nearly 900,000 Google citations for ‘HERstory, they are all based on a mistaken assumption. When Herodotus wrote the first history, the word meant simply an ‘inquiry’.
  4. Flip Chart. The term can be offensive to Filipinos, please use ‘writing block’.
  5. 1a and 1b — The headmistress of a grade school in Midlothian (Scotland) had to split a grade into two equal classes. Though the split was purely alphabetical, parents objects because those with children in ‘1b’ feared they may be perceived as academically inferior to those in ‘1a’.
  6. Politically Incorrect Colors — Staff at a coffee shop in Glasgow refused to serve a customer who had ordered a ‘black coffee’, believing it to be ‘racist.’ He wasn’t served until he changed his order to ‘coffee without milk’. Around the world we have reports of the word ‘black’ becoming emotionally charged and politically correct or incorrect depending upon one’s point of view.
  7. Oriental – Asian, please. Though this is generally a purely American phenomenon. In Europe, Asians prefer the term Oriental, which literally means ‘those from the East’.
  8. Menaissance – The rise of a ‘manliness’ culture or male renaissance. Replaces metrosexual, which evidently appealed to women but not men.
  9. Momtini — A Michigan mother invented the term ‘momtini’ as an act of rebellion against ‘parental correctness’. This has raised the hackles of child protection and ‘anti-alcohol’ groups.
  10. “Our Mother and Father Who are in Heaven” – From a new, ‘inclusive’ Bible translation (The Bible in a More Just Language) that replaces what it believes to be “divisive” teachings of Christianity.

Bonus: Political Correctness — ‘Equality Essentials,’ a 44-page training manual book called has been used for staff training courses at Kirklees Council in West Yorkshire suggests that the term Political Correctness is now politically incorrect.

Top Words for 2005 and 2004

The Top Politically Incorrect Words for 2005 were the BBC’s use of the euphemism ‘Misguided Criminals’ for Terrorists after the 7/7 Tube Bombings.

In 2004, the List was highlighted by Los Angeles County’s insistence of covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon.

 

Top Politically (in)Correct Words for 2005

 

 

Misguided Criminals, Intrinsic appitude, and Thought Shower Top List

 

San Diego, California (Updated November 29, 2005) Misguided Criminals, Intrinsic Aptitude, and Thought Shower top the list of the most egregious examples of politically correct language found in 2005 by the Global Language Monitor in its annual global survey. This year’s list includes words from the US, UK, France and Australia.

“2005 was the year we saw the Political Correctness movement become a truly global phenomenon,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor (GLM). “The list is but one more example of the insertion of politics into every facet of modern life.”

The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLM’s Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.

Click here to Watch WCCO’s Video (Minneapolis)

Click here to Read and Listen to the Chinese Radio Int’l (CRI) Report

The Top Politically inCorrect Words and Phrases for 2005:

  1. Misguided Criminals for Terrorist: The BBC attempts to strip away all emotion by using what it considers neutral descriptions when describing those who carried out the bombings in the London Tubes. The rub: the professed intent of these misguided criminals was to kill, without warning, as many innocents as possible (which is the common definition for the term, terrorist). The phrase was selected by GLM as but one example in line with the published BBC Editorial Guidelines where it is noted that the word ‘terrorist’ itself can be a barrier rather than aid to understanding. Suggested alternatives include: bomber, attacker, insurgent and militant, among others. These and similar words are deemed to have no emotional or value judgments. However, the word Terrorist can be used as long as it appears in a quoted attribution. [To see one example used by John Simpson, BBC World Affairs Editor, Click Here.]
  2. Intrinsic Aptitude (or lack thereof) was a suggestion by LawrenceSummers, the president of Harvard, on why women might be underrepresented in engineering and science. He was nearly fired for his speculation.
  3. Thought Shower or Word Shower substituting for brainstorm so as not to offend those with brain disorders such as epilepsy.
  4. Scum or “la racaille” for French citizens of Moslem and North African descent inhabiting the projects ringing FrenchCities. France’s Interior Minister, Nicolas Sarkozy, used this most Politically inCorrect (and reprehensible) label to describe the young rioters (and by extension all the inhabitants of the Cites).
  5. Out of the Mainstream when used to describe theideology of any political opponent: At one time slavery was in the mainstream, thinking the sun orbited the earth was in the mainstream, having your blood sucked out by leeches was in the mainstream. What’s so great about being in the mainstream?
  6. Deferred Success as a euphemism for the word fail. The Professional Association of Teachers in the UK considered a proposal to replace any notion of failure withdeferred success in order to bolster students self-esteem.
  7. Womyn for Women to distance the word from man. This in spite of the fact that the term man in the original Indo-European is gender neutral (as have been its successors for some 5,000 years).
  8. C.E. for A.D.: Is the current year A.D. 2005 or 2005 C.E.? There is a movement to strip A.D.(Latin for “In the Year of the Lord”) from the year designation used in the West since the 5th century and replace it with the supposedly moreneutral Common Era (though the zero reference year for the beginning of the Common Era remains the year of Christ’s birth).
  9. “God Rest Ye Merry Persons” for “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen”: A Christmas, eh, Holiday, carol with 500 years of history isnot enough to sway the Anglican Church at Cardiff Cathedral (Wales) from changing the original lyrics. There are those who suggest going one step further: “Higher Power Rest Ye Merry Persons”.
  10. Banning the word Mate: the Department ofParliamentary Services in Canberra issued a general warning to its security staff banning the use of the word ‘mate’ in dealings t with both members of Parliament and the public. What next? banning ‘no worries’ so as not to offend the worried, or banning ‘Down Under’ So as not to offend those of us who live in the “Up Over”.

HolidayBonus: Happy Holidays or Season’s Greetings for Christmas (which in some UK schools now label Wintervale). However, the word holiday is derived directly from Holy Day, and in the word X-Mas, the Greek letter ‘chi’ represented by the Roman X actually stands for the first two letters of the name Christ.) Now there are published reports of organization banning the traditional Christmas Colours of red and green.

Last year the Top Politically Incorrect words were: Los Angeles Countys insistence of covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon. Following closelywere same-sex marriage for marriage and waitron for waiter of waitress.

Australia bans the word ‘mate’

Australia bans the word ‘mate’

 

 

GLM’S Language Police suggest these others: ‘No Worries’, ‘Down Under’, ‘Barbie’, etc.

 

San Diego, Calif. August 24, 2005. Last week, the Department of Parliamentary Services in Canberra, issued a general warning to its security staff banning the use of the word ‘mate’ in any dealings they might have with both members of the Parliament and the public. Almost immediately, Australian Prime Minister John Howard called the ban “absurd” while the Opposition labeled it “un-Australian”. The ban has since been rescinded.

In direct response, the Global Language Monitor polled its readers (and enquired of itsLanguage Police) to come up with further suggestions of slang words and informal language that might serve the public interest by being banned in Australia. Earlier today, as a service to the international linguistic ‘mateship’ or community, GLM released its List.

“We believe that if the Department of Parliamentary Services had a list of “Further Slang terms and Colloquialisms fit to be Avoided, Shunned, or Otherwise Banned,” these are the words that would populate such a List,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and the WordMan for the Global Language Monitor. “To make the List, words had to be innocuous in themselves, but in the context of Political Correctness, potentially offensive to some segment of the populace”.

Recently, the BBC’s use of the term ‘misguided criminals’ and ‘bombers’ when referring to the perpetrators of the recent London blasts stirred an international debate on politically correct language. The BBC used those words to replace the term ‘terrorist’, which according to the BBC can “carry emotional or value judgments”.

GLM’s List is an ongoing compilation; currently the list of words to be potentially banned with associated commentary follows:

Barbeque — The shortened form, barbie, can be an invidious reference to the Barbie doll, and hence sexist.

Abso-bloody-lutely — Though the term bloody can signify an intensive, this use could also heighten insensitivity to the plight of farm animals that animal rights activists have long warned against.

Down Under — Down Under signifies the existence of an Up Over, which obviously is in the superior position of Uppness. Might be taken as ignoring the very real consequences of the North/South global divisions.

G’day — G’day is the shortened form of ‘Good Day’. Some etymologists believe that good can be ultimately traced to an earlier word for God. Hence, G’day could represent a conspiracy to insinuate the theistic world view into everyday life.

Mate — From classmates at male boarding schools. Obviously sexist, also elitist.

Nappy — Diaper, might offend those who illegally download music to their hard drives, and narcoleptics.

No Worries — This is offensive to those with OCD, and others who are plagued by constant self-doubt and apprehension.

Plonk — Inexpensive wine (in the US it’s called ripple). Plonk is perhaps a contraction of vin blanc; this might offend francophones.

Ta — Thank you. In the spirit International Harmony, the French s’ilvous plait is preferred.

Vegemite — A plot to foist upon a defenseless world, the supposed utopian ideal of what a meatless sandwich might be.

Zed — The letter Z. Not exactly slang, but a candidate for banishment nonetheless on general principles.

Nought — the number ‘zero’. If this caught on, the English-speaking world might finally have a name for the first decade of the 21st century: the Noughties.

To Read the Story from the Aussie perspective, CLICK HERE.

 

BBC Stirs Debate on Political Correctness

Filtering Events of All Emotional Content?

‘Terrorist’ Or ‘Bomber’?

.

 

San Diego, California (July 15, 2005) The BBC’s use of the term ‘misguided criminals’ and ‘bombers’ when referring to the perpetrators of the recent London blasts have stirred an international debate on politically correct language. The words replace the term terrorist, which according to the BBC can “carry emotional or value judgments”.

According to the Global Language Monitor’s exclusive PQ (Political-sensitivity Quotient) Index, the term ‘terrorist’ appears 700% more frequently on the web than ‘bomber’ when linked to terror-related activities such as suicide bombings, and the like. When tracking global news articles only, the word ‘bomber’ can be found in about 40% of the articles, though usually in combination with ‘terrorist’ or ‘terrorist-related’ words. The phrase ‘misguided criminals’ is found only about 5000 times on the entire web, many times linked to the emerging BBC story.

BBC guidelines state that credibility should never be undermined by the “careless use of words which (sic) carry emotional or value judgments”.

“The primary function of a news organization is to detail events as they occur in their existing cultural milieu, thereby recording the first draft of history. The BBC seems concerned with overstepping this boundary into what was once called yellow journalism. The greater danger here is to filter emotion-laden events of all emotional content in their pursuit of the non-judgmental,” said Paul JJ Payack, President (and the WordMan) of the Global Language Monitor.

The PQ Index is a proprietary algorithm that tracks politically sensitive words and phrases in the print. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, thereby separating the spin and the hype from the facts. The PQ Index is published quarterly.

Political Correctness Advocates Rail Against Western Calendar

A.D. 2005 or 2005 C.E.?

 

The Traditional Western Practice is to Reckon Time from the Birth of Jesus

 

San Diego, Calif. May 16, 2005. MetaNewswire. A small but vocal element is voicing opposition to the traditional Western practice of dividing time, measuring events as occurring before or after the birth of Jesus or B.C and A.D., according to a survey by The Global Language Monitor (GLM), using the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI).

The survey found that in the worldwide electronic and print media, and on the Internet, the current convention of A.D. and B.C. was found to be nearly 50 times as prevalent as that of the C.E. and B.C.E. convention. Nevertheless, the fact that the newer conventions were now found to be used at all indicates significant inroads, where until recently none existed.

The C.E. and B.C.E. conventions were introduced about a century ago in the Jewish and Scientific communities, but have been adopted increasingly by those who want to place some distance or obscure the Judeo-Christian roots of Western Civilization. The issue has become increasingly polarizing on college campuses, school textbook publishers, and in the various religious communities.

The Western Calendar is especially pervasive because all major electronic and computer systems have it deeply embedded in their basic instruction sets, or operating systems. This means that all electronic commerce, commercial applications, scientific, airlines, electronic games, automobiles, clocks, etc. are based on the Western Calendar.

“As with most language-based PC issues, the battle is intense, however, no authority or group can mandate linguistic change, said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “The fact is that both C.E. or A.D. both acknowledge the centrality of Jesus to the Western Calendar, (actually shorthand for Western Christendom), since both A.D. and C.E. both refer to the birth of Jesus as the time marker for the West.”

(In the aftermath of the French Revolution, the revolutionaries made anill-fated and short-lived attempt to restart the Western Calendar, which was to begin on September 22, 1792: the day of the declaration of the first French Republic. Months were cited by Roman numerals and named after meteorological conditions.)

Payack added, “Jesus, of course, was born in 749 AUC (ab urbecondita) from the founding of the City), since the Roman Calendar was dated from the mythical founding of the City by Romulus in 753 B.C. It is also interesting to note that when Dominus Exiguus, the 5th Century monk, created the current Calendar, he miscalculated, which is why it is now generally accepted that Jesus was born in the year 4 B.C, that is four years before the year of his birth.”

There are several major calendar systems in addition to the Western system currently in use. These include the Hebrew, Islamic, Buddhist, and Chinese.

The Hebrew Calendar dates from the Creation (current year 5765); the Islamic Calendar dates from the Hegira (current year 1425); the Chinese Calendar dates from the Emperor Huangdi, in 2637 B.C.; and the Buddhist Calendar dates from the birth of the Buddha, 543 years B.C., making 2005 the year 2548 of the Buddhist Era.

The Predictive Quantities Indicator is a proprietary algorithm that tracks specified words and phrases in the media and on the Internet. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. In this case, the words tracked were Anno Domini (A.D., literally Year of the Lord), Before Christ (B.C.), the Common Era (C.E.) and Before the Common Era (B.C.E.)

Top Politically Correct Word List of 2004

Politically inCorrect PCs

Master/Slave Tech Terms Raise Eyebrows in L.A.

.

Danville, California (December 4, 2004) Los Angeles County’s insistence on covering over with labels any computer networking protocols that mention master/slave jargon, has been chosen the top example of political correctness in language for 2004 .

“We found Master/Slave to be but the most egregious example of political correctness in 2004,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “This is but one more example of the insertion of politics into every facet of modern life, down to the level of the control processes of computer technology.”

In computer networking terminology, master/slave is commonly used to describe a device or process that has captured (and involuntarily) controls one or more devices or processes. The year has been rife with examples that have been nominated by the GLMs Language Police, volunteer language observers from the world over.

The Top Politically Correct Words and Phrases for 2004:

  1. Device for master and captured device for slave in computer networking terminology
  2. Non-same sex marriage, for marriage used in Democratic Presidential Primaries
  3. Waitron for waiter or waitress
  4. Red Sox Lover for Yankee Hater during the ALCS playoffs
  5. Higher Power for God
  6. Progressive for classical liberal
  7. Incurious rather than more impolite invectives for President Bush (such as idiot or moron)
  8. Insurgents substituting for terrorists in Iraq
  9. Baristas rather than waitrons
  10. First year student rather than Freshman, though Frosh is still acceptable

Top Politically Correct Words (Russia)

Master/Slave in the Times of Oman

Master/Slave is the Most Offensive Term (India)

The View from The Ukraine

Computer Term Named the Most un-PC (South Africa)

The View from China

TechTarget’s Dictionary of Computer Terms

The View on the Controversy From Down Under

Master/Slave Most Politicially Incorrect Phrase (ABC News)

**************

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

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Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases … and it is logically consistent.

Einstein_1921

 

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’. Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

 

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence. For example, the Harvard Annex was founded in in 1879, some 243 years after Harvard College.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same reasons.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Heavier than air flight was highly unlikely if not impossible.
  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance (called the Aether).
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

Conclusion: ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution, if at all.

 

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What Exactly is Settled Science?

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • In 1888, the founder of the American Astronomical Society wrote, “We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy.”
  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence (See Harvard and the Havard Annex – Radcliffe).
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

*******

The Mathematical Basis of Yogi-isms

Lawrence Peter “Yogi” Berra, a Hall of Fame catcher during the heyday of the great New York Yankee baseball dynasty of the ’50’s, was known for his interesting way of constructing sentences. These became widely known as ‘Yogi-isms’. What has not been previously understood is the mathematical basis of his thought by Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, Global Language Monitor.

Read more

PAC-12 Upsets Big Ten for Top Smartest Reputation After Conference Realignment

 

 

Big Five Football Conferences

 

 

 

 

 

The Rankings: 1. PAC 12, 2. Big Ten, 3. SEC, 4. ACC, 5. Big 12

Austin, TEXAS July 29, 2015 — Some five years after what has come to be known as Conference Realignment, the impact on the academic reputation at highest level of Collegiate Athletics is becoming clear(er). According to an analysis performed using the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th edition, The PAC-12 now is the Top College Conference by Academic Reputation.

As you can see from the chart below, The PAC 12 toppled the Big Ten from the Top Spot, also leapfrogging the SEC and ACC.

 

Top Conf by Academic Rep 2015

Since 2008, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide has been ranking the nation’s Top 422 Colleges and Universities according to the values of their brands. Almost immediately, the Global Language Monitor, the TTMB publisher, began to see parallels between the value of a school’s brand and its perceived athletic excellence.

In 2012, GLM began a study of all the major football conferences at the time while looking ahead to the future changes then proposed. This was not necessary in 2015, since there are now only five conferences at the highest level of the game that matter:

• The Atlantic Coast Conference
• The Big 10 Conference
• The Big 12 Conference
• The PAC 12 Conference
• The SEC Conference

As before, the Patriot League and the Ivy League, two FCS conferences renowned for their academic prowess, are used as controls.

The analysis also gathered together the schools that have been overlooked by the Big 5 and hope to join one of them in a future paroxysm of conference realignment. The Select Seven schools include: Rice University, Tulane University, Southern Methodist University, University of Tulsa, University of Central Florida, University of Cincinnati, and the University of Connecticut. We treat the Select Seven as a separate conference for ranking purposes.

Highlights of the analysis:

The Biggest Winner 1 – The Pac 12 jumps over the Big Ten, ACC and SEC to the Top Spot. This was not because of the addition of Utah (Net negative) and Colorado (Net positive) with realignment, but rather because of the continuing strengthening of the academic reputation of the original PAC 10 membership. In fact, members of the PAC 12 occupied five of the top eleven spots in the university ranking.

The Biggest Disappointment – The Big 10, always an academic juggernaut only strengthened itself with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland. The addition of Nebraska was a net negative. Nevertheless, the Big Ten fell into the second position, only marginally ahead of the SEC and ACC. Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio State all finished in the top twenty of the university ranking.

The SEC and the ACC both improved their academic reputations over the last few years with the SEC bolstering its already formidable academic stalwarts with Texas A&M and Missouri. The ACC added two Eastern academic powerhouses in Pitt (founded in 1787) and Syracuse. The addition of Louisville was a net negative. Head-to-head, in the SEC vs. ACC contest, the SEC narrowly secures the win by a whisker with a last second field goal.

The Biggest Loser – The Big Twelve. Losing academic stars Texas A&M, Missouri, and Colorado while gaining West Virginia was a net negative. The Big 12, anchored by UT, a Top 10 academic school, now stands at about a third of the Academic Branding Power of the PAC 12 and Big Ten.

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the tenth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

About the Global Language Monitor

The Global Language Monitor is the publisher of the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valleyby Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

 

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

A commentary on Tiger Woods (and Mickey Mantle) by Paul JJ Payack, the Global Language Monitor, Austin, Texas

April 2014

For some time now I have been pondering the apparent decline of Tiger Woods.

Over his long career he’s been cut and measured against those of Jack, Arnie, and Sam (sometimes Phil) and, now, Rory, Bubba, and the other Young Guns.

But the comparison to which I keep coming back never played out on the links, or Amen Corner, or even on the hallowed grounds of St. Andrews or Pebble Beach, but on the barren ball fields of Commerce, Oklahoma and later on a particularly verdant patch of grass off the Major Deegan Expressway in the Bronx. Of course I am not writing of one of Tiger’s fellow golfers at all, but rather of The Mick, one Mickey Charles Mantle, of New York Yankees fame.

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)
Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

Both Tiger and Mickey achieved greatness at an early age, to herald the beginnings of long, illustrious careers — and both were destined for that type of glory, perhaps, never (or at least seldom seen) before. Both had peak performances a dozen or so years into their career, then they both continued showing flashes of brilliance, amidst the strongest of suspicions that their careers had peaked in their 32nd years. If their past were prologues — then their prologues had, indeed, passed.

I watched Mickey stumbling through those last painful years, tuning to the game every 20 minutes or so, to catch him lumbering from the batter’s box toward the plate, hoping against hope that he’d collect those few hits that would preserve a career .300 batting average, the last mark of greatness he had left to achieve.

Even then, I had done the math. If only he could finish this last season with eight more hits than his then-current pace he’d achieve his final, career capping goal, then vanishing before his eyes (and mine).

In that context, I have been watching, studying Tiger, since what might now be considered his consummate effort, playing virtually if not literally on one leg, gutting out one last brilliant effort high above the surf at Torrey Pines.

This is not to say that Tiger will never pass Jack in his long-sought goal, the grail of capturing his Nineteenth Major. But the story, like that of The Mick, has taken on many of the trappings of a neo-Greek tragedy.

He, like Mickey, heroes from afar, reach for (and attain) heroic status, they each evince their individual brands of hubris, exhibit an achilles heel (or two), engage in mortal combat with a cast of rivals nearly god-like heroes themselves.

For The Mick there was no Deus ex-Machina to intervene in the final act; for Tiger, the Chorus has yet to sing.

 

 

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

Read: Why the Flutie Effect is Real (Harvard Business Review)

.

 

Big Ten Tops, SEC Most improved

Both New Big East Conferences Tumble

 

Austin, TX July 4th Weekend – July 4th might be Independence Day, but July 1st, was Conference Realignment Day when dozens of college and universities landed in what they hope to be greener pastures. The Global Language Monitor, analyzed pre-2012 conference configurations and compared them with their new membership additions or deletions.

Top Ten Consequences of Conference Realignment on Academic Reputation

  1. The Big Ten continues to rank first in academic reputation.
  2. Ohio State was the top ranked school in the Big 10.
  3. The PAC 12 lost ground with Utah, but is now just slightly behind the ACC.
  4. If included in the rankings the academically renowned Ivy League would have bested the Big Ten and the Patriot League would be in a virtual tie with the Big Ten.
  5. The Atlantic Coast Conference was a close No. 2, pulling within ten percent of the leader.
  6. The Southeast Conference was the most improved after adding two academic stars (Texas A&M and Mizzou).
  7. Both the New and Old Big East (Big East and American Athletic) conferences fell by about 20% each
  8. The academic reputation of the Big 12 remained virtually unchanged, after taking the hit with the loss of Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado and A&M.
  9. The ACC gains with the addition of Pitt and Syracuse but will pull back a bit in 2014 with the addition of Louisville.
  10. The Big Ten will grow even stronger with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland.

 

MISC. VI

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Are Superdelegates Just Another Form of Voter Suppression?

Over the last several election cycles charges of ‘voter supression’ are often hurled against what used to be termed the ‘Loyal Opposition’.

Most recently, the idea of using a photo ID for identification is flash point, with one side suggesting that those living on the margins of society frequently do not have the wherewithal to afford picture IDs, while the opposing argument is that most states require photoIDs to access the basic services provided to the poor.

Super delegates have seldom been mentioned in this regard, as yet another clever way to suppress the will of the people. However, the question is certainly a valid one, especially in view of the Democratic primaries where we have Bernie Sanders winning state-after-state. After each victory we are assured that these victories are all for naught, given Hillary Clinton’s overhelming grasp on the superdelegates, chosen by the Democratic Party establishment. Bernie, the once-obscure, small-state senator, and avowed socialist, is now making a significant dent into the received wisdom of who can be (or should) be allowed to carry the Democratic flag into the 2016 President Election.

The cry heard from the Left is that Hillary is safe because the bulk of the
super delegates currently back her, and thus the will of the people can rather readily be thwarted.

On the Republican side, we have the opposite problem, where the party leadership is said to be in disarray precisly because there is no mechanism to rather easily overrule the apparent will of the people.

Can you imagine the anger and cries of foul play if the situation were
reversed and, say Ted Cruz or Donald Trump, were denied the Republican Party nomination because the majority of the unelected, non-representative, Uber-delegates were dedicated to reversing the vote of the people?

It has not yet reached this point, but if the Sanders campaign reaches parity with that of Clinton in terms of the elected delegates, what happens
when the electorate realizes that the nomination will actually fall into the hands of those non-elected, non-representative, electors answerable to
none.

This MetaCommentary was written by Paul JJ Payack

-30-30-30-

 

You have permission to publish this work as long as proper attribution accompanies the copy since it is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

MetaThought Commentary is a service of the ThoughtTopper Institute.

For more information call 1.512.801.6823.

 

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The ThoughtTopper Institute

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: About

The articles included in this ThoughtTopper Institute series, were first drafted by Paul JJ Payack during the initial days of the so-called Great Recession. Subsequently the originals were expanded with Edward ML Peters, Ph.D and published in The Hill and other publications.

Paul JJ Payack

The premise of the original articles was that economists and politicians had missed the essence of the profound worldwide economic transformation that had been underway for some time and the economic restructuring would continue into the future, if constrained by this profoundly limited vision.

In fact, the facts have borne out our original assumptions. The Global Economic Restructuring has continued unabated. China continues to rise, the US and the West continue to struggle.

 

 

The Lost Decade of Japan has indeed been replicated, as we had feared. The recovery did not mirror previous recoveries in the US. And the traditional manufacturing sector continues to erode.

 

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor.

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D. is the the managing director of Austin-based ThoughtTopper Institute.

Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Settled Science

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: The Global Economic Restructuring

What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

This post first appeared on The Hill

November 3, 2010. It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Re-naming the Great Recession

A Retrospective on the Great Recession that Began Ten Years Ago This Month

 

AUSTIN, Texas, August 9, 2011. Words have power. Names have power. Three years ago we spoke to Newsweek about what should the then-current/still-current economic crisis be named. The ‘Great Recession’ was favored by the New York Times and eventually ‘certified’ by the AP Style Guide. The Global Language Monitor’s position was that the economic crisis of 2008 did not resemble a recession, as we had come to define recessions, and the resemblance to the Worldwide Economic Depression of the 1930s was tentative, at best.

GLM’s position was that we were experiencing was not a recession, neither great nor small, but something of a wholly differing sort: a Global Economic Restructuring.

Words have power. Names have power. In fact words and names can shape the contours of a debate. And, we might add, words and names carry the inherent capacity to lead us astray. Casting the current reality in the terms of those crises we’ve already experienced, provides the comfort (and illusion) that things are well in control.

It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Globe Naming the Great Recession

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit, as has now become obvious, because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

And the world, from China to Germany, stands aghast as we continue to argue, in spite of all available evidence that debt is a good thing. “We all say so, so it must be true!” seems to be the all-too-familiar refrain from Washington.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

By Paul JJ Payack and Edward ML Peters. Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: An American ‘Lost Decade’

“What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

November 30, 2010. Where do we go from here? We’ve already established that this is not a typical business cycle and this recession falls out of scope of previous recessions. Even the Great Depression was typical in the sense that it set off a worldwide fall in demand and productivity. It is now widely understood that while government intervention did stop the catastrophic collapse of the global economy, this intervention did little to revitalize global economic growth which did not resume until the onset of World War II.

This post first appeared on The Hill, the newspaper for Capitol Hill

Now, fast forward to September 2008 and months following shortly thereafter. There is wide agreement that the direct and dramatic Bush/Obama interventions did, indeed, prevent a global economic collapse. However, for many nations, including the U.S., the revitalization has yet to occur. While the stimulus spending saved many jobs in the public sector, few jobs were created in the private or wealth-creating sector. In retrospect it now appears that the stimulus was the equivalent to eating empty calories when hungry; a temporary rise in blood sugar without sustained nutrition.

This lack of wealth-building focus has led to a weak economic performance of 2.4 percent projected growth in GDP, hardly what one expects after such spending. (This growth rate has already been revised downward to 1.6 percent in the last quarter.) If this scenario does play out as expected, the eight million lost jobs will be replaced with new ones — by the 2020 time frame. By way of comparison, the “Reagan Recovery” created over 11,000,000 new jobs with four years.

While President Obama’s economic policies and overall execution of leadership is the current focus of many commentators, it remains a fact that this situation didn’t sneak up on us. The United States manufacturing sector has declined as a percentage of non-farm employment from about 30 percent in 1950 to just 9.27 percent in 2010, according to the October estimate of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Also, an underlying statistic is that the U.S. has been losing not just manufacturing jobs, but entire factories, over 40,000 of them since 2000. The ramifications here go far beyond the manufacturing sector itself. Indeed, by some estimates, there is a 15-1 multiplier between other jobs (including manufacturing and service) and each manufacturing position. Therefore, this unprecedented loss of an industrial base and its concomitant plethora of supporting positions leave a greatly reduced platform upon which to launch a successful and timely recovery.

And so the question remains: Where do we go from here?

First, take a deep breath, look in the mirror and repeat; the world is different from what it was in 1982 and wishing and acting like it was the same will not bring those lost manufacturing jobs back. No matter what we do, trying to recapture global leadership in industries where the average U.S. salary (excluding benefits) is over $20/hr where the similar cost in China or Mexico is between $2-$6/hr is a losing proposition. This is not to say that the U.S. should not continue to innovate and look to manufacture world-class products, only that we will have to pick our battles in places where we have a strategic competence and a willingness to compete. Specifically, management must be willing to continually analyze each process for best in class behaviors and continually work to improve in order to maintain a leadership position.

Second, focus strategic investment in industries where the U.S. has a substantial lead or could develop one in future. Good examples here are in the area of information technology, where private investment continues to create new enterprises and wealth and “green technology” whose future is yet to unfold. We need to remind ourselves of the effectiveness of the U.S. Space Program, not only in accomplishing its primary mission, but creating entire industries and market that are still returning value to this day.

Third, fully accept that the old manufacturing jobs will not be repatriated and implement a program that will both create true value for the economy while putting people back to work. In past recessions, workers were typically called back to their jobs as the economy improved. This time however, with the loss of so many factories, the jobs platform is significantly smaller and is unable to support the type of recovery we have seen in the past. Now, we must both create jobs in new markets and industries as well as find employment for those whose skill base will not readily transfer to the new jobs platform(s).

A good example of this is the proposal by the Center for American Progress that outlines a plan to develop an energy efficiency industry to retrofit approximately 40 percent of the country’s buildings (approximately 50 million structures) within the next decade. This would require more than $500 billion in public and private investment and create over 600,000 “sustainable” jobs. Under the plan, energy use in those buildings would be reduced up to 40 percent and generate between $32 billion and $64 billion in annual consumer savings. Those savings would be used to re-pay the construction loans that would support the program.

This type of program would both create private sector jobs and help re-build U.S. infrastructure for the next five decades, all the while creating a buffer between the current economic environment and the one that will emerge.

One word of caution: we need a dozen or more initiatives of this kind to even come close to replacing the 8,000,000 lost jobs.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

Are Superdelegates Just Another Form of Voter Suppression?

Over the last several election cycles charges of ‘voter supression’ are often hurled against what used to be termed the ‘Loyal Opposition’.

Most recently, the idea of using a photo ID for identification is flash point, with one side suggesting that those living on the margins of society frequently do not have the wherewithal to afford picture IDs, while the opposing argument is that most states require photoIDs to access the basic services provided to the poor.

Super delegates have seldom been mentioned in this regard, as yet another clever way to suppress the will of the people. However, the question is certainly a valid one, especially in view of the Democratic primaries where we have Bernie Sanders winning state-after-state. After each victory we are assured that these victories are all for naught, given Hillary Clinton’s overhelming grasp on the superdelegates, chosen by the Democratic Party establishment. Bernie, the once-obscure, small-state senator, and avowed socialist, is now making a significant dent into the received wisdom of who can be (or should) be allowed to carry the Democratic flag into the 2016 President Election.

The cry heard from the Left is that Hillary is safe because the bulk of the
super delegates currently back her, and thus the will of the people can rather readily be thwarted.

On the Republican side, we have the opposite problem, where the party leadership is said to be in disarray precisly because there is no mechanism to rather easily overrule the apparent will of the people.

Can you imagine the anger and cries of foul play if the situation were
reversed and, say Ted Cruz or Donald Trump, were denied the Republican Party nomination because the majority of the unelected, non-representative, Uber-delegates were dedicated to reversing the vote of the people?

It has not yet reached this point, but if the Sanders campaign reaches parity with that of Clinton in terms of the elected delegates, what happens
when the electorate realizes that the nomination will actually fall into the hands of those non-elected, non-representative, electors answerable to
none.

This MetaCommentary was written by Paul JJ Payack

-30-30-30-

 

You have permission to publish this work as long as proper attribution accompanies the copy since it is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

MetaThought Commentary is a service of the ThoughtTopper Institute.

For more information call 1.512.801.6823.

 

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The ThoughtTopper Institute

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: About

The articles included in this ThoughtTopper Institute series, were first drafted by Paul JJ Payack during the initial days of the so-called Great Recession. Subsequently the originals were expanded with Edward ML Peters, Ph.D and published in The Hill and other publications.

Paul JJ Payack

The premise of the original articles was that economists and politicians had missed the essence of the profound worldwide economic transformation that had been underway for some time and the economic restructuring would continue into the future, if constrained by this profoundly limited vision.

In fact, the facts have borne out our original assumptions. The Global Economic Restructuring has continued unabated. China continues to rise, the US and the West continue to struggle.

 

 

The Lost Decade of Japan has indeed been replicated, as we had feared. The recovery did not mirror previous recoveries in the US. And the traditional manufacturing sector continues to erode.

 

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor.

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D. is the the managing director of Austin-based ThoughtTopper Institute.

Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Settled Science

 

Phrase of the Day: Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason. The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!” (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment. It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process. Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as: “Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity). The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case. We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education. Alleged reasons: women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence.
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: The Global Economic Restructuring

What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

This post first appeared on The Hill

November 3, 2010. It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Re-naming the Great Recession

A Retrospective on the Great Recession that Began Ten Years Ago This Month

 

AUSTIN, Texas, August 9, 2011. Words have power. Names have power. Three years ago we spoke to Newsweek about what should the then-current/still-current economic crisis be named. The ‘Great Recession’ was favored by the New York Times and eventually ‘certified’ by the AP Style Guide. The Global Language Monitor’s position was that the economic crisis of 2008 did not resemble a recession, as we had come to define recessions, and the resemblance to the Worldwide Economic Depression of the 1930s was tentative, at best.

GLM’s position was that we were experiencing was not a recession, neither great nor small, but something of a wholly differing sort: a Global Economic Restructuring.

Words have power. Names have power. In fact words and names can shape the contours of a debate. And, we might add, words and names carry the inherent capacity to lead us astray. Casting the current reality in the terms of those crises we’ve already experienced, provides the comfort (and illusion) that things are well in control.

It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Globe Naming the Great Recession

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit, as has now become obvious, because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

And the world, from China to Germany, stands aghast as we continue to argue, in spite of all available evidence that debt is a good thing. “We all say so, so it must be true!” seems to be the all-too-familiar refrain from Washington.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

By Paul JJ Payack and Edward ML Peters. Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: An American ‘Lost Decade’

“What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

November 30, 2010. Where do we go from here? We’ve already established that this is not a typical business cycle and this recession falls out of scope of previous recessions. Even the Great Depression was typical in the sense that it set off a worldwide fall in demand and productivity. It is now widely understood that while government intervention did stop the catastrophic collapse of the global economy, this intervention did little to revitalize global economic growth which did not resume until the onset of World War II.

This post first appeared on The Hill, the newspaper for Capitol Hill

Now, fast forward to September 2008 and months following shortly thereafter. There is wide agreement that the direct and dramatic Bush/Obama interventions did, indeed, prevent a global economic collapse. However, for many nations, including the U.S., the revitalization has yet to occur. While the stimulus spending saved many jobs in the public sector, few jobs were created in the private or wealth-creating sector. In retrospect it now appears that the stimulus was the equivalent to eating empty calories when hungry; a temporary rise in blood sugar without sustained nutrition.

This lack of wealth-building focus has led to a weak economic performance of 2.4 percent projected growth in GDP, hardly what one expects after such spending. (This growth rate has already been revised downward to 1.6 percent in the last quarter.) If this scenario does play out as expected, the eight million lost jobs will be replaced with new ones — by the 2020 time frame. By way of comparison, the “Reagan Recovery” created over 11,000,000 new jobs with four years.

While President Obama’s economic policies and overall execution of leadership is the current focus of many commentators, it remains a fact that this situation didn’t sneak up on us. The United States manufacturing sector has declined as a percentage of non-farm employment from about 30 percent in 1950 to just 9.27 percent in 2010, according to the October estimate of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Also, an underlying statistic is that the U.S. has been losing not just manufacturing jobs, but entire factories, over 40,000 of them since 2000. The ramifications here go far beyond the manufacturing sector itself. Indeed, by some estimates, there is a 15-1 multiplier between other jobs (including manufacturing and service) and each manufacturing position. Therefore, this unprecedented loss of an industrial base and its concomitant plethora of supporting positions leave a greatly reduced platform upon which to launch a successful and timely recovery.

And so the question remains: Where do we go from here?

First, take a deep breath, look in the mirror and repeat; the world is different from what it was in 1982 and wishing and acting like it was the same will not bring those lost manufacturing jobs back. No matter what we do, trying to recapture global leadership in industries where the average U.S. salary (excluding benefits) is over $20/hr where the similar cost in China or Mexico is between $2-$6/hr is a losing proposition. This is not to say that the U.S. should not continue to innovate and look to manufacture world-class products, only that we will have to pick our battles in places where we have a strategic competence and a willingness to compete. Specifically, management must be willing to continually analyze each process for best in class behaviors and continually work to improve in order to maintain a leadership position.

Second, focus strategic investment in industries where the U.S. has a substantial lead or could develop one in future. Good examples here are in the area of information technology, where private investment continues to create new enterprises and wealth and “green technology” whose future is yet to unfold. We need to remind ourselves of the effectiveness of the U.S. Space Program, not only in accomplishing its primary mission, but creating entire industries and market that are still returning value to this day.

Third, fully accept that the old manufacturing jobs will not be repatriated and implement a program that will both create true value for the economy while putting people back to work. In past recessions, workers were typically called back to their jobs as the economy improved. This time however, with the loss of so many factories, the jobs platform is significantly smaller and is unable to support the type of recovery we have seen in the past. Now, we must both create jobs in new markets and industries as well as find employment for those whose skill base will not readily transfer to the new jobs platform(s).

A good example of this is the proposal by the Center for American Progress that outlines a plan to develop an energy efficiency industry to retrofit approximately 40 percent of the country’s buildings (approximately 50 million structures) within the next decade. This would require more than $500 billion in public and private investment and create over 600,000 “sustainable” jobs. Under the plan, energy use in those buildings would be reduced up to 40 percent and generate between $32 billion and $64 billion in annual consumer savings. Those savings would be used to re-pay the construction loans that would support the program.

This type of program would both create private sector jobs and help re-build U.S. infrastructure for the next five decades, all the while creating a buffer between the current economic environment and the one that will emerge.

One word of caution: we need a dozen or more initiatives of this kind to even come close to replacing the 8,000,000 lost jobs.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

 

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PAC-12 Upsets Big Ten for Top Smartest Reputation After Conference Realignment

 

 

Big Five Football Conferences

 

 

 

 

 

The Rankings: 1. PAC 12, 2. Big Ten, 3. SEC, 4. ACC, 5. Big 12

Austin, TEXAS July 29, 2015 — Some five years after what has come to be known as Conference Realignment, the impact on the academic reputation at highest level of Collegiate Athletics is becoming clear(er). According to an analysis performed using the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th edition, The PAC-12 now is the Top College Conference by Academic Reputation.

As you can see from the chart below, The PAC 12 toppled the Big Ten from the Top Spot, also leapfrogging the SEC and ACC.

 

Top Conf by Academic Rep 2015

Since 2008, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide has been ranking the nation’s Top 422 Colleges and Universities according to the values of their brands. Almost immediately, the Global Language Monitor, the TTMB publisher, began to see parallels between the value of a school’s brand and its perceived athletic excellence.

In 2012, GLM began a study of all the major football conferences at the time while looking ahead to the future changes then proposed. This was not necessary in 2015, since there are now only five conferences at the highest level of the game that matter:

• The Atlantic Coast Conference
• The Big 10 Conference
• The Big 12 Conference
• The PAC 12 Conference
• The SEC Conference

As before, the Patriot League and the Ivy League, two FCS conferences renowned for their academic prowess, are used as controls.

The analysis also gathered together the schools that have been overlooked by the Big 5 and hope to join one of them in a future paroxysm of conference realignment. The Select Seven schools include: Rice University, Tulane University, Southern Methodist University, University of Tulsa, University of Central Florida, University of Cincinnati, and the University of Connecticut. We treat the Select Seven as a separate conference for ranking purposes.

Highlights of the analysis:

The Biggest Winner 1 – The Pac 12 jumps over the Big Ten, ACC and SEC to the Top Spot. This was not because of the addition of Utah (Net negative) and Colorado (Net positive) with realignment, but rather because of the continuing strengthening of the academic reputation of the original PAC 10 membership. In fact, members of the PAC 12 occupied five of the top eleven spots in the university ranking.

The Biggest Disappointment – The Big 10, always an academic juggernaut only strengthened itself with the addition of Rutgers and Maryland. The addition of Nebraska was a net negative. Nevertheless, the Big Ten fell into the second position, only marginally ahead of the SEC and ACC. Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ohio State all finished in the top twenty of the university ranking.

The SEC and the ACC both improved their academic reputations over the last few years with the SEC bolstering its already formidable academic stalwarts with Texas A&M and Missouri. The ACC added two Eastern academic powerhouses in Pitt (founded in 1787) and Syracuse. The addition of Louisville was a net negative. Head-to-head, in the SEC vs. ACC contest, the SEC narrowly secures the win by a whisker with a last second field goal.

The Biggest Loser – The Big Twelve. Losing academic stars Texas A&M, Missouri, and Colorado while gaining West Virginia was a net negative. The Big 12, anchored by UT, a Top 10 academic school, now stands at about a third of the Academic Branding Power of the PAC 12 and Big Ten.

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the tenth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

About the Global Language Monitor

The Global Language Monitor is the publisher of the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valleyby Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

 

& Privilege" href="http://www.languagemonitor.com/top-colleges/for-the-first-time-the-brands-of-elite-private-colleges-have-been-hit-by-the-backlash-against-elites-entitlement-and-privilege/">Elite Private College ‘Brands’ hit by the Backlash Against Elites, Entitlement & Privilege

Winners Appear Across the Spectrum: Elite Public Institutions, Technical and Specialized Schools

2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition
Austin, Texas, July 20, 2015 — For the first time, the ‘brands’ of elite private colleges have been hit by the backlash against elites, entitlement and privilege. In fact, for the first time, a major shift has been detected in the brand perceptions at the top of the rankings with elite private universities being pushed further down the rankings by their elite public counterparts. This according to the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition.
MIT, a school remains atop the list with the nation’s Top Collegiate Brand for the second, third, fourth consecutive analysis.
The Elite Private Universities, such as Harvard, Chicago, Stanford, Penn and NYU all lost some brand equity. In fact, the University of California system took the No.2, 3 and 4 spots led by UCLA, Berkeley, Davis and San Diego.
“Over the last several years there has been a mounting backlash against those perceived to be elite, entitled and privileged,” said Paul JJ Payack, Editor-in-Chief of the TTMB College Guide.
“This is exemplified by the Top 1%, Anonymous and Occupy Movements. The recent racial tension in Florida, Ferguson, Missouri, Baltimore, and Staten Island and the subsequent “Black Lives Matter” Movement have called further attention to perception of a growing gap between rich and poor or ‘haves and have nots’.
The chorus has been recently joined by reputable analysts such as Malcolm Gladwell, the author of Tipping Point and New Yorkerwriter, who famously tweeted about a recent $450 million gift to Harvard, “If billionaires don’t step up, Harvard will soon be down to its last $30 billion” and “After all, Harvard is only the world’s richest university, with an [endowment] that’s larger than the gross domestic products of Jordan, Bolivia, Iceland and about 90 assorted other countries.”

This is the type of near real-time movement that the TTMB was designed to monitor — often representing wider societal trends. The methodologies of, for example, US News, are designed to monitor factors that change more slowly over time, such as peer opinions and endowment size. While others are mainly concerned with career-tracking information, and the like.

TTMB 2016 College Guide

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These are the Top 25 US Universities for 2015. The Elite Public Universities that moved up this year are highlighted in light blue. The Elite Private Universities that lost ground in their Brand Equity are highlighted in taupe.
Top 25 Universities

The University of Florida and Florida State University both continued their rise and took the No. 32 and No. 33 spots respectively. Penn State, which had a resurgence since its football scandal, fell back to No. 52 (from No. 42), suggesting some lingering effects.

In the College Division, Wesleyan University (CT) tops the list of Top US Colleges, supplanting the US Military Academy (West Point). The School of the Art Institute of Chicago took the second spot, the highest ever ranking from the Art, Design and Music Category. The College of the Holy Cross (Holy Cross) placed third. Williams and Richmond rounded out the top five.

The 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide is available by download for immediate delivery.
This is the tenth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding eight years. There have now been four different schools taking the top spot Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.
There are 199 Colleges in the rankings. These are the Top 40 US Colleges for 2015.
Top US Colleges 1 to 40
New York, California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Texas and Ohio lead the “Top States for Top Colleges”. TSFTC details the top universities and colleges foe each state. (Forty states have Top Schools represented.}
Top States for Top Colleges
Highlights of The 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz of the Top 419 College Brands, 10th Edition include detailed analysis of each of these specialty categories:
Specialized Category Leaders
The 222 Top US Universities 1. MIT, 2. UCLA, 3. Berkeley
The 199 Top US Colleges 1. Wesleyan (CT), 2. SAIC, 3. Holy Cross
The Top US Private Universities 1. Chicago, 2. Harvard, 3. Stanford
The Top US Public Universities 1. UCLA, 2. Berkeley, 3. UC Davis
The Top US Private Colleges 1. Wesleyan (CT), 2. SAIC, 3. Holy Cross
The Top US Public Colleges 1. West Point, 2. Annapolis, 3. Air Force
The Top Engineering Universities 1. MIT, 2. Virginia Tech, 3. Georgia Tech
The Top Engineering Collages 1. Harvey Mudd, 2. MSOE, 3. SD School of Mines
The Top Catholic Universities 1. U San Diego, 2. Boston College, 3. Notre Dame.
The Top Catholic Colleges 1. Holy Cross, 2. Siena College, 3. Willamette
Top Denomination-related Colleges 1. St Olaf, 2. High Point, 3. Muhlenberg
Top Military and Service Academies 1. West Point, 2. Annapolis, 3. Air Force
Top Art, Design, and Music Schools 1. School of the Art Institute AIC, 2. Pratt Institute, 3. School of the Arts, PA
Top Women’s Colleges 1. Smith, 2. Wellesley, 3. Barnard
Top Historically Black Colleges and Universities 1. Morehouse, 2. Spelman, 3.Rhodes
Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

 

The Various Global Language Monitor Word of the Year Schedules

GLM Words of the Year Schedules

No. 1, Words, Names and Phrases of 2014 will be announced during the US Thanksgiving Week, Tuesday November 25

No. 2, Top Business Buzzwords (50) will be announced in early December.

No.3, Top Words of the Quindecennial of the 21st century will be announced in mid-December.

No. 4, Top Words, One Hundred Years Hence & Map of the Re-federalized United States for 2114 A.D. later in December.

Words of the Year Already Announced:

 

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,027,770.5 (July 1, 2014 estimate)

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MIT has a 3-Peat as the Top University Brand; College Rankings from the Consumers’ Point of View

Top 400 US College and University Brands for 2014, 9th Edition, by the Global Language Monitor

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

TTMB 2016 College Guide

Download the latest guide now!

MIT is the Top University Brand for the Third Year Running

West Point is the Top College Division Brand

Austin, Texas, August 12, 2014 – MIT is the Top US University Brand for the Third Year Running according to the Top 400 US College and University Brands for 2014, 9th Edition, to be released later this week by the Global Language Monitor. Harvard, which placed No. 2 to MIT for the third straight year, had rejected the idea of adding a ‘trade school’ in the mid-nineteenth century. That trade school would one day become the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Following MIT and Harvard were the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Chicago; and the University of Texas, Austin. Rounding out the Top Ten were the University of California at Los Angeles; the University of California, Davis, Stanford University, New York University, and Northwestern.
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The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors, again. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now private universities, reversing the score from 2013.
Biggest Movers in the Top Twenty-Five were Dartmouth (+55), Northwestern (+24), and Washington University in St. Louis U (+22). The biggest positive movement in the last three analyses was made by the University of Minnesota (+57). Editor’s Note: There is often some confusion with patronyms of the University of Washington, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Minnesota. The patronyms are UDub, WashU, and The U, respectively.
There are four different schools taking the top spot in the university division over the last seven years: MIT, Harvard, Michigan and Wisconsin. In the college division there are now seven colleges to have taken the top spot since these analyses began: West Point, University of Richmond, Williams College, Davidson College, Carleton College, Wellesley College, and Colorado College.
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“Tracking schools as brands actually ranks schools from a consumers’ point of view And using Big Data Textual Analysis allows near real-time updates of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’ using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded entity, such as luxury automobiles or consumer electronics”, said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “Employing these advanced techniques to analyze Big Data also helps eliminate the built-in biases and arbitrary distinctions of most other rating systems, such as excluding from the rankings online institutions, military academies , design, music, and art schools.” This is the ninth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding seven years.
The full report, Top 400 US College and University Brands for 2014, 9th Edition, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is now available for download. The report features analysis of collegiate brand equity, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and more.
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The Top Twenty-Five US Universities their previous rankings and comments are listed below.

2014 Rank, University, Last ranking, Comment

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  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1) — MIT claims the title of the Top College Brand for the third year in a row.

  2. Harvard University (2) — Harvard rejected the idea of adding a ‘trade school’ in the mid-nineteenth century so what became MIT was created as a separate entity (Epic Fail).

  3. University of California, Berkeley (5) — Cal beats Stanford in the Big Game, brand-equity edition, once again, but the Cardinal lead the series overall 5-4.

  4. University of Chicago (7) — Michael Jordan’s Chicago Bulls won three NBA titles in a row at the same time that UC was picking up three consecutive Nobel Prizes for Economics.

  5. University of Texas, Austin (8) — More than football, now a globally recognized academic powerhouse (with an endowment growing $1 billion per year).

  6. University of California at Los Angeles (14) — Big move into the Top Ten College Brands.

  7. University of California, Davis (18) — Viticulture & Enology are just the gateway into this world-class university.

  8. Stanford University (4) — Always in the Top Ten but not yet recognized as the Top Academic Brand.

  9. New York University (15) — Continues seemingly inexorable rise in stature.

  10. Northwestern University (34) — Chicago and Boston only cities with two Top Ten Academic Brands.

  11. University of Pennsylvania (11) — Penn has hovered around the eleventh spot for some time now.

  12. University of California, San Diego (19) — Always near the top in federal research funding.

  13. University of Washington (13) — Another fine showing for the UDub brand.

  14. Columbia University (3) — New York’s Ivy League school is being challenged for its leadership position by recent inroads by Cornell.

  15. University of Wisconsin, Madison (16) — Recognized as 2011’s Top College Brand.

  16. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (25) — No. 1 in 2010 and 2009; moving back up the brand rankings.

  17. Princeton University (10) — Originally named the College of New Jersey was located in Newark before moving to it present location.

  18. Dartmouth College (55 ) — Like Princeton, exerts a global impact from small town America.

  19. University of Virginia (32) — Thomas Jefferson’s school is back in the Top Twenty.

  20. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (23) — UNC is now gaining global recognition.

  21. Yale University (6) — One of the Big Three Ivy Institutions.

  22. University of Minnesota (20) — Another solid ranking for “The U”.

  23. Cornell University (9) — Now challenging Columbia University for Ivy supremacy in New York.

  24. Michigan State University (31) — The first land-grant institution now serves as a model for universities worldwide.

  25. Washington University in St. Louis (47) — WashU’s name causes some branding confusion yet its academic brand remains strong.

For the full ranking of all the Top 220 US University brands go here.

The United States Military Academy (West Point) is the Top US College Brand for 2014, replacing the University of Richmond which finished as runner-up. Wellesley College and Amherst College followed. Rounding out the Top Ten were Williams College, Middlebury College, Vassar College, Babson College, and the Pratt Institute.
West Point completed a remarkable rise over the last three analyses, moving up some 23 spots. Pomona College, out of Claremont, CA, also capped a remarkable run moving up some 22 places. Pomona’s is the highest finish for a West Coast college since Occidental scored the No. 2 position back in 2011. Wellesley’s finish was the highest for a women’s college in 2014. Wellesley remains the only women’s college to have finished No. 1 in any college ranking system, when it took the top spot in 2009.
The US Military Academy, of course, also took top public college honors. Some Twenty-two of the Top 25 colleges are private institutions.
There are now seven colleges to have taken the Top College Brand spot since these analyses began: West Point, University of Richmond, Williams College, Davidson College, Carleton College, Wellesley College, Colorado College.
The full report, Top 400 US College and University Brands for 2014, 9th Edition, the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is now available for download. The report features analysis of college brand equity, BAI measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and more.

The Top Twenty-Five US Colleges, their previous rankings, and comments are listed below.

2014 Rank, College, Last ranking, Comment

  1. United States Military Academy (3) — West Point has the Top Brand among American colleges.

  2. University of Richmond (1) — Last year’s No. 1 brand; now a fixture in the Top Three.

  3. Pomona College (25) — Highest ranking yet for the Claremont Colleges Star.

  4. Wellesley College (4) — Top College Brand for 2009; only time a women’s school topped ANY college ranking.

  5. Amherst College (6) — Top Little Three comes in as No. 5 Collegiate Brand.

  6. Williams College (7) — A $2,000,000,000 endowment goes a long way when building a collegiate brand.

  7. Middlebury College (8) — Moves up one spot for 2013.

  8. Vassar College (9) — Also moves up one spot from 2013.

  9. Babson College (11) — Babson is trending upward with the entrepreneur express.

  10. Pratt Institute (10) — Pratt Institute and Cooper Union always in a tight race; yet again Pratt prevails.

  11. Bucknell University (2) — Now the largest Liberal Arts school in the US.

  12. The Cooper Union (12) — Looks like free tuition might become a thing of the past at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.

  13. Lafayette College (18) — Another Patriot League school on the rise.

  14. Colgate University (21) — Nice move upward for the Hamilton, NY school.

  15. Bowdoin College (14) — Bowdoin was actually chartered by Governor Samuel Adams of Massachusetts (of which Maine was a district at the time).

  16. Swarthmore College (17) — Some 20% of students at this Quaker-founded school attain PhDs in their fields.

  17. Occidental College (15) — No. 2 Liberal Arts college on the West Coast (following Pomona).

  18. Bard College (20) — Doesn’t like College Rankings in general but can’t be excluded as a Top Collegiate Brand.

  19. Oberlin College (19) — First American institution of higher education to include women and Blacks in their regular admissions.

  20. United States Naval Academy (13) — Midship-persons are among the most rigorously trained in American higher education.

  21. Barnard College (24) — One of the original Seven Sisters, Barnard has been ‘associated’ with Columbia since 1900.

  22. Rhode Island School of Design (16) — RISD and Brown have contiguous campuses in Providence, RI.

  23. Dickinson College (22) — Note for its 3:2 engineering program with Columbia, Rensselaer, and Case.

  24. Reed College (26) — Strengthens brand on the fact that Steve Jobs ‘dropped out’ here.

  25. Davidson College (27) — Top College Brand of 2011; Richmond and Davidson are the two top collegiate brands of the South.

For the full ranking of all the Top US 200 College brands go here.

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Today, Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Top 200 US College Brands, 2014 by the Global Language Monitor

Top 200 US College Brands 2014 by the Global Language Monitor

 

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.


TTMB 2016 College Guide

2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide

To See the Entire Press Release, Click here

 

2014 Rank, College, Rank in 2013

  1. United States Military Academy 3

  2. University of Richmond 1

  3. Pomona College 25

  4. Wellesley College 4

  5. Amherst College 6

  6. Williams College 7

  7. Middlebury College 8

  8. Vassar College 9

  9. Babson College 11

  10. Pratt Institute 10

  11. Bucknell University 2

  12. The Cooper Union 12

  13. Lafayette College 18

  14. Colgate University 21

  15. Bowdoin College 14

  16. Swarthmore College 17

  17. Occidental College 15

  18. Bard College 20

  19. Oberlin College 19

  20. United States Naval Academy 13

  21. Barnard College 24

  22. Rhode Island School of Design 16

  23. Dickinson College 22

  24. Virginia Military Institute 23

  25. Reed College 26

  26. Davidson College 27

  27. School of the Art Institute of Chicago 5

  28. Grinnell College 28

  29. Trinity Washington University 29

  30. Bryn Mawr College 39

  31. Gettysburg College 34

  32. Trinity College 38

  33. Union College 31

  34. Morehouse College 35

  35. Carleton College 37

  36. Spelman College 33

  37. Washington and Lee University 36

  38. Skidmore College 42

  39. Kenyon College 40

  40. Hamilton College 30

  41. United States Air Force Academy 41

  42. The Juilliard School 45

  43. Mount Holyoke College 43

  44. Drew University 44

  45. Colby College 47

  46. Smith College 48

  47. Bates College 46

  48. DePauw University 49

  49. Haverford College 51

  50. Knox College 50

  51. Messiah College 68

  52. Flagler College 52

  53. Wesleyan University 55

  54. Sweet Briar College 53

  55. St. Michael’s College 54

  56. Willamette University 56

  57. College of the Holy Cross 64

  58. Denison University 61

  59. Macalester College 60

  60. Siena College 57

  61. Westminster College 58

  62. Bethune-Cookman University 59

  63. Centre College 62

  64. Furman University 65

  65. Gustavus Adolphus 32

  66. St. Olaf College 66

  67. University of the Arts, PA 93

  68. University of Puget Sound 63

  69. Rhodes College 67

  70. Berklee College of Music 69

  71. Claremont McKenna College 75

  72. Sarah Lawrence College 76

  73. St Lawrence University 71

  74. Ohio Northern University 77

  75. Guilford College 79

  76. Hobart William Smith College 70

  77. St. John’s College, MD 74

  78. Beloit College 78

  79. Ohio Wesleyan University 83

  80. Linfield College 73

  81. The College of Wooster 80

  82. Birmingham Southern College 81

  83. Elmira College 82

  84. Wheaton College IL 72

  85. San Francisco Art Institute 89

  86. Stonehill College 84

  87. California Institute of the Arts 95

  88. Colorado College 85

  89. Oklahoma Baptist College 86

  90. Hampden – Sydney College 87

  91. Hillsdale College 90

  92. High Point University 92

  93. Muhlenberg College 88

  94. Presbyterian College 91

  95. Bennington College 126

  96. Whitman College 94

  97. Cornell College 96

  98. Calvin College 97

  99. Allegheny College 98

  100. Kalamazoo College 120

  101. Berea College 103

  102. Ripon College 124

  103. Wittenberg University 104

  104. Albion College 117

  105. Illinois Wesleyan University 115

  106. Scripps College 130

  107. SUNY—Purchase 118

  108. Lake Forest College 111

  109. Susquehanna University 119

  110. St. Mary’s College, IN 155

  111. Carthage College 113

  112. Goucher College 105

  113. Moravian College 114

  114. Milwaukee School of Engineering 116

  115. SUNY—Geneseo 125

  116. Wofford College 110

  117. California College of the Arts 102

  118. Pitzer College 142

  119. Fisk University 100

  120. Wheaton College, MA 107

  121. Hood College 135

  122. Whittier College 106

  123. St. Mary-of-the-Woods College 121

  124. US Coast Guard Academy 137

  125. Marietta College 128

  126. Randolph College, Macon 101

  127. Ursinus College 138

  128. Goshen College 152

  129. Wabash College 122

  130. Florida Southern College 108

  131. Agnes Scott College 123

  132. Earlham College 129

  133. Grove City College 112

  134. Albright College 133

  135. Adrian College 139

  136. Loras College IA 145

  137. Lewis and Clark College 146

  138. Hartwick College 153

  139. Harvey Mudd College 109

  140. Augustana College IL 127

  141. Lebanon Valley College 141

  142. Elizabethtown College 131

  143. Hendrix College 132

  144. San Francisco Conservatory of Music 154

  145. Transylvania University 143

  146. Endicott College 144

  147. Sewanee—University of the South 147

  148. Boston Conservatory 140

  149. Juniata College 136

  150. South Dakota School of Mines 151

  151. Lawrence University 148

  152. McDaniel College 134

  153. Hampshire College 158

  154. Elizabeth City State University 156

  155. Morningside College, IA 159

  156. Curtis Institute of Music 157

  157. University of North Carolina School of the Arts 160

  158. Franklin and Marshall College 162

  159. Augustana College, SD 161

  160. Westmont College 149

  161. Fashion Institute of Technology 171

  162. Hollins University, VA 163

  163. Connecticut College 168

  164. Buena Vista University 166

  165. McMurry University, TX 169

  166. Eastern Mennonite University 164

  167. University of Minnesota, Morris 165

  168. New College of Florida 170

  169. Bethel College, IN 172

  170. New England Conservatory of Music 150

  171. Wells College 176

  172. College of St. Benedict/St. John University 173

  173. Southwestern University 174

  174. Ouachita Baptist University 175

  175. Minneapolis College of Art and Design 178

  176. School of Visual Arts 183

  177. SUNY College of Technology, Alfred 179

  178. United States Merchant Marine Academy 180

  179. Hanover College, IN 177

  180. United States Coast Guard Academy 182

  181. Erskine College 187

  182. College of New Jersey 181

  183. Austin College 184

  184. Millsaps College 186

  185. Olin College 185

  186. Bard College at Simon’s Rock 188

  187. Howard Payne University 189

  188. LaGrange College, GA 192

  189. Berry College 191

  190. St. John’s College, NM 194

  191. Emory and Henry College 193

  192. St. Michael’s College 197

  193. Lenoir-Rhyne University 196

  194. Washington and Jefferson College 198

  195. Concordia University Texas 195

  196. University of the Ozarks 199

  197. Corcoran College of Art and Design 200

  198. Coe College 99

  199. Cleveland Institute of Music 167

  200. Eugene Lang College of New School U. 201

Top 220 University Brands, 2014 by Global Language Monitor

Top 400 US University Brands, 9th Edition, by the Global Language Monitor

 

Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, the top 375,000 global print and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. This is the ninth edition of the survey since it first appeared in 2008.

To See the Entire Press Release, Click here

 

TTMB 2016 College Guide

Buy the Latest Edition!

2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide

 

2014 Rank, University, Rank in 2013

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1

  2. Harvard University 2

  3. University of California, Berkeley 5

  4. University of Chicago 7

  5. University of Texas, Austin 8

  6. University of California at Los Angeles 14

  7. University of California, Davis 18

  8. Stanford University 4

  9. New York University 15

  10. Northwestern University 34

  11. University of Pennsylvania 11

  12. University of California, San Diego 19

  13. University of Washington 13

  14. Columbia University 3

  15. University of Wisconsin, Madison 16

  16. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 25

  17. Princeton University 10

  18. Dartmouth College 73

  19. University of Virginia 32

  20. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 23

  21. Yale University 6

  22. University of Minnesota 20

  23. Cornell University 9

  24. Michigan State University 31

  25. Washington University in St. Louis 47

  26. Georgia Institute of Technology 21

  27. University of Southern California 30

  28. Ohio State University, Columbus 12

  29. University of Illinois — Urbana, Champaign 26

  30. Johns Hopkins University 22

  31. Purdue University 28

  32. Indiana University, Bloomington 44

  33. University of Colorado, Boulder 43

  34. George Washington University 38

  35. Texas A&M University 40

  36. University of California, Santa Barbara 56

  37. University of California, Irvine 49

  38. Arizona State University 101

  39. Boston College 25

  40. Boston University 33

  41. Georgetown University 35

  42. Pennsylvania State University 39

  43. University of Georgia 29

  44. University of Iowa 36

  45. University of Pittsburgh 37

  46. University of Miami 45

  47. Iowa State University 64

  48. Florida State University 46

  49. University of Oregon 50

  50. Wake Forest University 94

  51. University of Missouri, Columbia 58

  52. University of Massachusetts, Amherst 66

  53. University of Notre Dame 42

  54. Rutgers, the State University of NJ 41

  55. Carnegie Mellon University 51

  56. University of South Carolina, Columbia 55

  57. Loyola University Maryland 79

  58. American University 70

  59. Oregon State University 60

  60. California Institute of Technology 53

  61. Duke University 24

  62. George Mason University 59

  63. Rochester Inst. of Technology 98

  64. Californis State U, Long Beach 141

  65. Virginia Tech 17

  66. Brown University 48

  67. University of Florida 72

  68. Loyola University, Chicago 80

  69. Vanderbilt University 57

  70. University of Connecticut 179

  71. Syracuse University 52

  72. Missouri U. of Science and Technology 72

  73. University of California, Riverside 69

  74. University of Maryland, College Park 63

  75. University of Oklahoma 93

  76. Brigham Young University, Provo 106

  77. University of Arizona 67

  78. Central Michigan University 54

  79. Washington State University 143

  80. Northeastern University 81

  81. CUNY-Brooklyn 121

  82. Villanova University 89

  83. Colorado State University 132

  84. University of California, Santa Cruz 68

  85. University of Delaware 74

  86. University of Rochester 62

  87. Howard University 84

  88. St. Joseph’s University 133

  89. Case Western Reserve University 76

  90. University of Tennessee 77

  91. Miami University, OH 89

  92. Southern Methodist University 87

  93. Emory University 71

  94. Stony Brook University 88

  95. Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo 139

  96. University of Alabama 116

  97. University of New Hampshire 95

  98. University of Phoenix 27

  99. University of Kentucky 75

  100. Binghamton– SUNY 130

  101. University of San Francisco 105

  102. Loyola University New Orleans 129

  103. University of Denver 92

  104. College of Charleston 184

  105. University of Arkansas 111

  106. Tufts University 61

  107. Michigan Technological University 176

  108. James Madison University 102

  109. Lehigh University 107

  110. University of Vermont 135

  111. Auburn University 65

  112. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 96

  113. Kansas State University 137

  114. Santa Clara University 103

  115. Manhattanville College 203

  116. Rice University 78

  117. Catholic University of America 117

  118. Hofstra University 108

  119. Brandeis University 104

  120. Elon University 171

  121. Baylor University 85

  122. University at Buffalo—SUNY 127

  123. St. Catherine’s University 147

  124. Tulane University 82

  125. University of the Pacific 125

  126. Drexel University 90

  127. Mills College 187

  128. Clemson University 83

  129. North Carolina State University, Raleigh 122

  130. Fordham University 86

  131. Texas State U, San Marcos 128

  132. DePaul University 97

  133. University of Dayton 120

  134. Springfield College 191

  135. Sacred Heart University 195

  136. Kansas University 91

  137. College of William and Mary 102

  138. Wagner College 194

  139. CUNY-Hunter College 100

  140. Liberty University 114

  141. Bentley University 185

  142. Marquette University 99

  143. University of Redlands 197

  144. St. Mary’s College of California 115

  145. Texas Christian University 112

  146. Rider University 192

  147. Hamline University 189

  148. University of San Diego 113

  149. Worcester Polytechnic Institute 167

  150. CUNY-City College 206

  151. Iona College 165

  152. John Carroll University 200

  153. Capella University 153

  154. Alfred University 199

  155. Xavier University 178

  156. Stetson University 162

  157. Valparaiso University 173

  158. Manhattan College 166

  159. Tuskegee University 146

  160. Illinois Institute of Technology 119

  161. Montclair State University 154

  162. The Citadel 168

  163. University of Dallas 181

  164. Stevens Institute of Technology 160

  165. Fairfield University 175

  166. Hood College 210

  167. Pepperdine University 118

  168. Oral Roberts University 188

  169. CUNY-Queens 110

  170. Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. 157

  171. University of Mary Washington 205

  172. Yeshiva University 139

  173. St. Louis University 123

  174. Seattle University 124

  175. Loyola Marymount University 138

  176. Truman State University 182

  177. Creighton University 136

  178. Clarkson University 180

  179. Augsburg College 202

  180. Baldwin – Wallace College 204

  181. University of Tulsa 145

  182. Ithaca College 126

  183. CUNY-Baruch 109

  184. Evergreen State 186

  185. Walden University 156

  186. LaSalle University 214

  187. Towson University 131

  188. St Edward’s University 208

  189. University of Northern Iowa 211

  190. Florida A&M University 190

  191. Rowan University 170

  192. Simmons College 174

  193. Chapman University 134

  194. Kaplan University 159

  195. Colorado School of Mines 161

  196. Morgan State University 164

  197. University of Portland 201

  198. Providence College 148

  199. Quinnipiac University 150

  200. Roger Williams University 193

  201. University of Scranton 183

  202. Emerson College 144

  203. Ramapo College 196

  204. New Jersey Institute of Technology 149

  205. St. Bonaventure University 213

  206. Drake University 142

  207. Clark University 151

  208. Gonzaga University 152

  209. Western Governors University 198

  210. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 209

  211. Butler University 140

  212. Dillard University 212

  213. Rollins College 155

  214. St. Mary’s University of San Antonio 169

  215. Whitworth University 215

  216. Xavier University of Louisiana 158

  217. University of Mary Hardin-Baylor 207

  218. Abilene Christian University 172

  219. Bradley University 163

  220. St. Johns University, NY 177

 

Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013

MIT takes Top Honors from Harvard, Again; Public Universities edge Privates in Top 25

  • Volatility increases as consumers presented with more choices
  • Game-changers include Internet schools, for-profit institutions, and regional stars.
  • MOOCs begin having Influence
  • SAT reporting scandals have impact

TTMB 2016 College Guide

Download the Complete Report Now!

.

Austin, Texas, January 30, 2013 – For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings. Following MIT and Harvard were

Released April 2, 2014
New Guide Released June 2014

Columbia University; Stanford University; and the University of California, Berkeley up nine spots and moving into the Top Ten. Rounding out the Top Ten were Yale; the University of Chicago (which slipped four spots); the University of Texas, Austin; Cornell and Princeton.

.
The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors making a huge move back into the Top Ten. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now public universities. The University of Minnesota gained 15 spots up to No. 20, while Wisconsin and Michigan dropped 11 and 12 spots respectively. There have now been four different schools taking the top spot in the last six years: Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.
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The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors making a huge move back into the Top Ten. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now public universities. The University of Minnesota gained 15 spots up to No. 20, while Wisconsin and Michigan dropped 11 and 12 spots respectively.
.
“The higher education world is in the midst of a major upheaval that has only begun to sort itself out. You can’t have institutions of the stature of MIT, Berkeley and Texas give away their product for free, or millions of students opt for on-line schools or educations provided by for-profit organizations — and not record significant change. This is all part of the globalization (and democratization) of higher ed. In fact you need a seismograph to better understand the shifting of the tectonic plates of education, once long thought stable,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.
.
The rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. This is the eighth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding six years; the rankings are conducted every nine months. There have now been four different schools taking the top spot in the last six years: Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.
.
To read about all Top Universities and Colleges continue reading here.
To see the Top Public Universities, go here.
To see the Top Private Universities, go here.
To see the Top Engineering Institutions, go here.
To see the Top Religion-related Universities, go here.
To see the Top Public Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Private Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Military/Service Academies, go here.
To see the Art/Design/Music Schools, go here.
TTMB 2016 College Guide

Click here to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools.

The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
The figure below shows the Top Universities and their rank in 2012.
.
2013 Top Universities 2012
1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1
2 Harvard University 2
3 Columbia University 4
4 Stanford University 8
5 University of California, Berkeley 14
6 Yale University 9
7 University of Chicago 3
8 University of Texas, Austin 10
9 Cornell University 6
10 Princeton University 15
11 University of Pennsylvania 12
12 Ohio State University, Columbus 16
13 University of Washington 11
14 University of California at Los Angeles 7
15 New York University 20
16 University of Wisconsin, Madison 5
17 Virginia Tech 19
18 University of California, Davis 17
19 University of California, San Diego 22
20 University of Minnesota 35
21 Georgia Institute of Technology 23
22 Johns Hopkins University 24
23 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 28
24 Duke University 21
25 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 13
25 Boston College 26
26 University of Illinois—Urbana, Champaign 34
27 University of Phoenix 38
28 Purdue University 42
29 University of Georgia 27
30 University of Southern California 32
31 Michigan State University 40
32 University of Virginia 25
33 Boston University 29
34 Northwestern University 31
35 Georgetown University 25
36 University of Iowa 44
37 University of Pittsburgh 33
38 George Washington University 30
39 Pennsylvania State University 50
40 Texas A&M University 47
41 Rutgers, the State University of NJ 57
42 University of Notre Dame 53
43 University of Colorado, Boulder 58
44 Indiana University, Bloomington 18
45 University of Miami 37
46 Florida State University
47 Washington University in St. Louis 66
48 Brown University 36
49 University of California, Irvine 43
50 University of Oregon 60
51 Carnegie Mellon University 45
52 Syracuse University 49
53 California Institute of Technology 41
54 Central Michigan University
55 University of South Carolina, Columbia 70
56 University of California, Santa Barbara 39
57 Vanderbilt University 46
58 University of Missouri, Columbia 54
59 George Mason University
60 Oregon State University
61 Tufts University 71
62 University of Rochester 51
63 University of Maryland, College Park 48
64 Iowa State University 56
65 Auburn University 64
66 University of Massachusetts, Amherst 62
67 University of Arizona 79
68 University of California, Santa Cruz 52
69 University of California, Riverside 55
70 American University 107
71 Emory University 59
72 University of Florida 61
72 Missouri U. of Science and Technology 78
73 Dartmouth College 72
74 University of Delaware 65
75 University of Kentucky 68
76 Case Western Reserve University 67
77 University of Tennessee 69
78 Rice University 72
79 Loyola University Maryland 154
80 Loyola University, Chicago 90
81 Northeastern University 74
82 Tulane University 86
83 Clemson University 137
84 Howard University 88
85 Baylor University 73
86 Fordham University 83
87 Southern Methodist University 87
88 Stony Brook University 117
89 Miami University, OH 92
89 Villanova University 89
90 Drexel University 93
91 Kansas University 77
92 University of Denver 94
93 University of Oklahoma 82
94 Wake Forest University 76
95 University of New Hampshire 105
96 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 97
97 DePaul University 102
98 Rochester Inst. of Technology 108
99 Marquette University 95
100 CUNY-Hunter College 139
101 Arizona State University 84
102 College of William and Mary 96
102 James Madison University 101
103 Santa Clara University 103
104 Brandeis University 99
105 University of San Francisco 175
106 Brigham Young University, Provo 63
107 Lehigh University 91
108 Hofstra University 115
109 CUNY-Baruch 139
110 CUNY-Queens 119
111 University of Arkansas 111
112 Texas Christian University 98
113 University of San Diego 113
114 Liberty University 114
115 St. Mary’s College of California 112
116 University of Alabama 110
117 Catholic University of America 116
118 Pepperdine University 128
119 Illinois Institute of Technology 123
120 University of Dayton 100
121 CUNY-Brooklyn 135
122 North Carolina State University, Raleigh 80
123 St. Louis University 118
124 Seattle University 141
125 University of the Pacific 136
126 Ithaca College 142
127 University at Buffalo—SUNY 169
128 Texas State U, San Marcos 133
129 Loyola University New Orleans 134
130 Binghamton– SUNY 145
131 Towson University 124
132 Colorado State University 104
133 St. Joseph’s University 132
134 Chapman University 151
135 University of Vermont 81
136 Creighton University 122
137 Kansas State University 106
138 Loyola Marymount University 153
139 Yeshiva University 129
139 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo 172
140 Butler University 131
141 Californis State U, Long Beach 125
142 Drake University 130
143 Washington State University 102
144 Emerson College 149
145 University of Tulsa 152
146 Tuskegee University 85
147 St. Catherine University 121
148 Providence College 127
149 New Jersey Institute of Technology 157
150 Quinnipiac University 155
151 Clark University 146
152 Gonzaga University 138
153 Capella University 147
154 Montclair State University 144
155 Rollins College 198
156 Walden University 140
157 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. 163
158 Xavier University of Louisiana 181
159 Kaplan University 126
160 Stevens Institute of Technology 148
161 Colorado School of Mines 150
162 Stetson University 165
163 Bradley University 162
164 Morgan State University 177
165 Iona College 178
166 Manhattan College 158
167 Worcester Polytechnic Institute 120
168 The Citadel 167
169 St. Mary’s University of San Antonio 188
170 Rowan University 121
171 Elon University 161
172 Abilene Christian University 170
173 Valparaiso University 171
174 Simmons College 182
175 Fairfield University 174
176 Michigan Technological University 180
177 St. Johns University, NY 143
178 Xavier University 89
179 University of Connecticut 75
180 Clarkson University 173
181 University of Dallas 185
182 Truman State University 109
183 University of Scranton 179
184 College of Charleston 190
185 Bentley University 168
186 Evergreen State 192
187 Mills College 160
188 Oral Roberts University 187
189 Hamline University 207
190 Florida A&M University 193
191 Springfield College 186
192 Rider University 176
193 Roger Williams University 95
194 Wagner College 194
195 Sacred Heart University 183
196 Ramapo College 189
197 University of Redlands 156
198 Western Governors University 184
199 Alfred University 196
200 John Carroll University 164
201 University of Portland 195
202 Augsburg College 210
203 Manhattanville College 204
204 Baldwin – Wallace College 199
205 University of Mary Washington 202
206 CUNY-City College 166
207 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor 191
208 St Edward’s University 197
209 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 159
210 Hood College 208
211 University of Northern Iowa 205
212 Dillard University 200
213 St. Bonaventure University 206
214 LaSalle University 203
215 Whitworth University 209
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
This is the second major ranking to be released since the Penn State scandal. In the previous TTMB rankings 3.42% of citations had some association with the scandal. In this survey, scandal-related citations crept up to 6.8%. Penn State’s ranking had been on an upswing since since the success of their identity campaign in 2010. Since peaking in the Top 20 in 2011, Penn State fell to No. 51 in the immediate aftermath of the scandal in 2012. Penn State’s has now recovered to its current position at No. 39, which suggests that its reputation is still suffering the effects of the Sandusky scandal.
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Emory in the university rankings and Claremont McKenna in the college rankings each had SAT misrepresentations made public since the last survey. Both fell in the rankings. Emory fell from No. 59 to No. 71. Claremont McKenna fell more dramatically from No. 33 to No. 75 in the College Rankings. Of course, it is open to question whether or not their drops were a direct result of their reported improprieties.
..
Top Colleges
For the second year in a row, Richmond topped the college rankings, followed by Bucknell, up two spots. The rest of the Top 25 underwent significant changes. No. 3 West Point, No. 4 Wellesley, and No. 5 the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), made strides of sixteen, eight and twelve respectively. Middlebury and Vassar broke into the Top Ten with gains of six and 11 spots, respectively, while Babson jumped 16 spots and Navy gained 11. Other top movers included RISD, Swarthmore, Lafayette, Bard, Dickinson, and VMI, which all made double-digit moves into the Top 25, with RISD moving up some 21 spots and Dickinson some 34.
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Reflecting the healthy distribution of “Little Ivies” across the national landscape, Richmond is the sixth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began, which now have been represented by the South (Richmond and Davidson), the West (Colorado College), the East (Williams and Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was (and remains) the only women’s college to top a general college ranking.
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Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.

The figure below shows the Top Colleges and their rank in 2012.

2013 Top Colleges Overall Ranking 2012
1 University of Richmond 1
2 Bucknell University 4
3 United States Military Academy 19
4 Wellesley College 12
5 School of the Art Institute of Chicago 17
6 Amherst College 6
7 Williams College 2
8 Middlebury College 14
9 Vassar College 20
10 Pratt Institute 10
11 Babson College 27
12 The Cooper Union 9
13 United States Naval Academy 24
14 Bowdoin College 22
15 Occidental College 13
16 Rhode Island School of Design 37
17 Swarthmore College 26
18 Lafayette College 30
19 Oberlin College 8
20 Bard College 43
21 Colgate University 11
22 Dickinson College 56
23 Virginia Military Institute 36
24 Barnard College 28
25 Pomona College 18
26 Reed College 40
27 Davidson College 16
28 Grinnell College 86
29 Trinity Washington University 111
30 Hamilton College 25
31 Union College 5
32 Gustavus Adolphus 52
33 Spelman College 83
34 Gettysburg College 71
35 Morehouse College 41
36 Washington and Lee University 63
37 Carleton College 23
38 Trinity College 29
39 Bryn Mawr College 42
40 Kenyon College 61
41 United States Air Force Academy 35
42 Skidmore College 77
43 Mount Holyoke College 51
44 Drew University 59
45 The Juilliard School 15
46 Bates College 69
47 Colby College 54
48 Smith College 3
49 DePauw University 67
50 Knox College 82
51 Haverford College 53
52 Flagler College 118
53 Sweet Briar College 179
54 St. Michael’s College 101
55 Wesleyan University 34
56 Willamette University 81
57 Siena College 72
58 Westminster College 168
59 Bethune-Cookman University 76
60 Macalester College 57
61 Denison University 79
62 Centre College 104
63 University of Puget Sound 97
64 College of the Holy Cross 50
65 Furman University 58
66 St. Olaf College 78
67 Rhodes College 126
68 Messiah College 90
69 Berklee College of Music 154
70 Hobart William Smith College 68
71 St Lawrence University 64
72 Wheaton College IL 103
73 Linfield College 125
74 St. John’s College, MD 138
75 Claremont McKenna College 33
76 Sarah Lawrence College 93
77 Ohio Northern University 89
78 Beloit College 94
79 Guilford College 39
80 College of Wooster 200
81 Birmingham Southern College 145
82 Elmira College 147
83 Ohio Wesleyan University 49
84 Stonehill College 131
85 Colorado College 7
86 Oklahoma Baptist College 136
87 Hampden – Sydney College 130
88 Muhlenberg College 109
89 San Francisco Art Institute 112
90 Hillsdale College 98
91 Presbyterian College 80
92 High Point University 105
93 University of the Arts, PA 102
94 Whitman College 106
95 California Institute of the Arts 119
96 Cornell College 107
97 Calvin College 60
98 Allegheny College 113
99 Coe College 133
100 Fisk University 96
101 Randolph College, Macon 100
102 California College of the Arts 146
103 Berea College 176
104 Wittenberg University 124
105 Goucher College 114
106 Whittier College
107 Wheaton College, MA 151
108 Florida Southern College 117
109 Harvey Mudd College 73
110 Wofford College 129
111 Lake Forest College 137
112 Grove City College
113 Carthage College 149
114 Moravian College 134
115 Illinois Wesleyan University 108
116 Milwaukee School of Engineering 84
117 Albion College 116
118 SUNY—Purchase 55
119 Susquehanna University 152
120 Kalamazoo College 123
121 St. Mary-of-the-Woods College 38
122 Wabash College 120
123 Agnes Scott College 141
124 Ripon College 144
125 SUNY—Geneseo 169
126 Bennington College 140
127 Augustana College IL 66
128 Marietta College 132
129 Earlham College 128
130 Scripps College 85
131 Elizabethtown College 165
132 Hendrix College 158
133 Albright College
134 McDaniel College
135 Hood College 177
136 Juniata College 163
137 US Coast Guard Academy 75
138 Ursinus College 127
139 Adrian College 150
140 Boston Conservatory 153
141 Lebanon Valley College 157
142 Pitzer College 122
143 Transylvania University 92
144 Endicott College 155
145 Loras College IA 148
146 Lewis and Clark College 175
147 Sewanee—University of the South 143
148 Lawrence University 46
149 Westmont College 182
150 New England Conservatory of Music 180
151 South Dakota School of Mines 173
152 Goshen College
153 Hartwick College 164
154 San Francisco Conservatory of Music 174
155 St. Mary’s College, IN 159
156 Elizabeth City State University 189
157 Curtis Institute of Music 183
158 Hampshire College 48
159 Morningside College, IA 178
160 University of North Carolina School of the Arts 167
161 Augustana College, SD 88
162 Franklin and Marshall College 171
163 Hollins University, VA 185
164 Eastern Mennonite University
165 University of Minnesota, Morris 186
166 Buena Vista University 135
167 Cleveland Institute of Music 156
168 Connecticut College 44
169 McMurry University, TX 181
170 New College of Florida 192
171 Fashion Institute of Technology 31
172 Bethel College, IN 87
173 College of St. Benedict/St. John University 110
174 Southwestern University 47
175 Ouachita Baptist University 188
176 Wells College
177 Hanover College, IN 160
178 Minneapolis College of Art and Design 62
179 SUNY College of Technology, Alfred 70
180 United States Merchant Marine Academy 197
181 College of New Jersey 184
182 United States Coast Guard Academy 172
183 School of Visual Arts 32
184 Austin College 196
185 Olin College 162
186 Millsaps College 170
187 Erskine College 91
188 Bard College at Simon’s Rock 190
189 Howard Payne University 194
191 Berry College 193
192 LaGrange College, GA 199
193 Emory and Henry College
194 St. John’s College, NM 191
195 Concordia University Texas 45
196 Lenoir-Rhyne University 142
197 St. Michael’s College 187
198 Washington and Jefferson College 198
199 University of the Ozarks 161
200 Corcoran College of Art and Design 139
201 Eugene Lang College of New School U. 195
.
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Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com. ##########################################################################################################

Top US Public Universities for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz

 

This data supplements the earlier announcement of Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013 by the Global Language Monitor.

TTMB 2016 College Guide

Click here to order the ”2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings”

Big Ten picks up three of the Top Ten spots

University of California, Berkeley tops all public universities followed by the University of Texas, Austin; Ohio State, Columbus; the University of Washington; and UCLA. Rounding out the Top Ten were the University of Wisconsin, Madison; Virginia Tech; the University of California, Davis; the University of California, San Diego; and the University of Minnesota.

The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors making a huge move back into the Top Ten. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now public universities. The University of Minnesota gained 15 spots up to No. 20, while Wisconsin and Michigan dropped 11 and 12 spots respectively. There have now been four different schools taking the top spot over eight rankings in the last six years, two public and two private: Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.

The following details the Top US Public Universities for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

Rank, University, Overall Ranking

1

University of California, Berkeley

5

2

University of Texas, Austin

8

3

Ohio State University, Columbus

12

4

University of Washington

13

5

University of California at Los Angeles

14

6

University of Wisconsin, Madison

16

7

Virginia Tech

17

8

University of California, Davis

18

9

University of California, San Diego

19

10

University of Minnesota

20

11

Georgia Institute of Technology

21

12

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

23

13

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

25

14

University of Illinois—Urbana, Champaign

26

15

Purdue University

28

16

University of Georgia

29

17

Michigan State University

31

18

University of Virginia

32

19

University of Iowa

36

20

University of Pittsburgh

37

21

Pennsylvania State University

39

22

Texas A&M University

40

23

Rutgers, the State University of NJ

41

24

University of Colorado, Boulder

43

25

Florida State University

46

25

Indiana University, Bloomington

44

26

University of California, Irvine

49

27

University of Oregon

50

28

Central Michigan University

54

29

University of South Carolina, Columbia

55

30

University of California, Santa Barbara

56

31

University of Missouri, Columbia

58

32

George Mason University

59

33

Oregon State University

60

34

University of Maryland, College Park

63

35

Iowa State University

64

36

Auburn University

65

37

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

66

38

University of Arizona

67

39

University of California, Santa Cruz

68

40

University of California, Riverside

69

41

University of Florida

72

42

Missouri U. of Science and Technology

72

43

University of Delaware

74

44

University of Kentucky

75

45

University of Tennessee

77

46

Clemson University

83

47

Stony Brook University

88

48

Miami University, Ohio

89

50

Kansas University

91

51

University of Oklahoma

93

52

University of New Hampshire

95

53

CUNY-Hunter College

100

54

Arizona State University

101

55

College of William and Mary

102

56

James Madison University

102

57

CUNY-Baruch

109

58

CUNY-Queens

110

59

University of Arkansas

111

60

University of Alabama

116

61

CUNY-Brooklyn

121

62

North Carolina State University, Raleigh

122

63

University at Buffalo—SUNY

127

64

Texas State U, San Marcos

128

65

Binghamton—SUNY

130

66

Towson University

131

67

Colorado State University

132

68

University of Vermont

135

69

Kansas State University

137

70

Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

139

71

California State U, Long Beach

141

72

New Jersey Institute of Technology

149

72

Washington State University

143

73

Montclair State University

154

74

Colorado School of Mines

161

75

Morgan State University

164

76

The Citadel

168

77

Rowan University

170

78

Michigan Technological University

176

79

University of Connecticut

179

80

Truman State University

182

81

College of Charleston

184

82

Evergreen State

186

83

Florida A&M University

109

84

Ramapo College

196

85

University of Mary Washington

205

86

CUNY-City College

206

87

University of Northern Iowa

211

.
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Top Private US Universities 2013

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Austin, Texas, February 11, 2013 – For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities by the Global Language Monitor. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings.
In the Private University category, MIT and Harvard were followed by Columbia University; Stanford University; Yale; the University of Chicago (which slipped four spots); Cornell;
Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania; and NYU. There are 130 private universities in the category.
Top Colleges TrendTopper 2014 Cover
Click here to order the 2014 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Guide now!

 

The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors making a huge move back into the Top Ten. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now public universities. The University of Minnesota gained 15 spots up to No. 20, while Wisconsin and Michigan dropped 11 and 12 spots respectively. There have now been four different schools taking the top spot in the last six years: Harvard, Michigan, Wisconsin, and MIT.

The University of California, Berkeley took top public university honors making a huge move back into the Top Ten. Some 13 of the Top 25 are now public universities. The University of Minnesota gained 15 spots up to No. 20, while Wisconsin and Michigan dropped 11 and 12 spots respectively.”Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
The following lists the Top Private Universities for 2013:
Private Rank, Overall Rank 2013, Institution, 2012 Overall Rank
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Private Rank Overall 2013 Top Private 2012
1 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1
2 2 Harvard University 2
3 3 Columbia University 4
4 4 Stanford University 8
5 6 Yale University 9
6 7 University of Chicago 3
7 9 Cornell University 6
8 10 Princeton University 15
9 11 University of Pennsylvania 12
10 15 New York University 20
11 22 Johns Hopkins University 24
12 24 Duke University 21
13 25 Boston College 26
14 27 University of Phoenix 38
15 30 University of Southern California 32
16 33 Boston University 29
17 34 Northwestern University 31
18 35 Georgetown University 25
19 38 George Washington University 30
20 42 University of Notre Dame 53
21 45 University of Miami 37
22 47 Washington University in St. Louis 66
23 48 Brown University 36
24 51 Carnegie Mellon University 45
25 52 Syracuse University 49
25 53 California Institute of Technology 41
26 57 Vanderbilt University 46
27 61 Tufts University 71
28 62 University of Rochester 51
29 70 American University 107
30 71 Emory University 59
31 73 Dartmouth College 72
32 76 Case Western Reserve University 67
33 78 Rice University 72
34 79 Loyola University Maryland 154
35 80 Loyola University, Chicago 90
36 81 Northeastern University 74
37 82 Tulane University 86
38 84 Howard University 88
39 85 Baylor University 73
40 86 Fordham University 83
41 87 Southern Methodist University 87
42 89 Villanova University 89
43 90 Drexel University 93
44 92 University of Denver 94
45 94 Wake Forest University 76
46 96 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 97
47 97 DePaul University 102
48 98 Rochester Inst. of Technology 108
49 99 Marquette University 95
50 103 Santa Clara University 103
51 104 Brandeis University 99
52 105 University of San Francisco 175
53 106 Brigham Young University—Provo 63
54 107 Lehigh University 91
55 108 Hofstra University 115
56 112 Texas Christian University 98
57 113 University of San Diego 113
58 114 Liberty University 114
59 115 St. Mary’s College of California 112
60 117 Catholic University of America 116
61 118 Pepperdine University 128
62 119 Illinois Institute of Technology 123
63 120 University of Dayton 100
64 123 St Louis University 118
65 124 Seattle University 141
66 125 University of the Pacific 136
67 126 Ithaca College 142
68 129 Loyola University New Orleans 134
69 133 St. Joseph’s University 132
70 134 Chapman University 151
71 136 Creighton University 122
72 138 Loyola Marymount University 153
72 139 Yeshiva University 129
73 140 Butler University 131
74 142 Drake University 130
75 144 Emerson College 149
76 145 University of Tulsa 152
77 146 Tuskegee University 85
78 147 St. Catherine University 121
79 148 Providence College 127
80 149 New Jersey Institute of Technology 157
81 150 Quinnipiac University 155
82 151 Clark University 146
83 152 Gonzaga University 138
84 153 Capella University 147
85 155 Rollins College 198
86 156 Walden University 140
87 157 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. 163
88 158 Xavier University of Louisiana 181
89 159 Kaplan University 126
89 160 Stevens Institute of Technology 148
90 162 Stetson University 165
91 163 Bradley University 162
92 165 Iona College 178
93 166 Manhattan College 158
94 167 Worcester Polytechnic Institute 120
95 169 St. Mary’s University of San Antonio 188
96 170 Elon University 161
97 171 Abilene Christian University 170
98 172 Valparaiso University 171
99 173 Simmons College 182
100 174 Fairfield University 174
101 175 St Johns University NY 143
102 177 Xavier University 89
102 178 Clarkson University 173
103 180 University of Dallas 185
104 181 University of Scranton 179
105 183 College of Charleston 190
106 184 Bentley University 168
107 185 Mills College 160
108 187 Oral Roberts University 187
109 188 Hamline University 207
110 189 Springfield College 186
111 191 Rider University 176
112 192 Roger Williams University 95
113 193 Wagner College 194
114 194 Sacred Heart University 183
115 195 University of Redlands 156
116 197 Western Governors University 184
117 198 Alfred University 196
118 199 John Carroll University 164
119 200 University of Portland 195
120 201 Augsburg College 210
121 202 Manhattanville College 204
122 203 Baldwin – Wallace College 199
123 204 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor 191
124 207 St Edward’s University 197
125 208 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 159
126 209 Hood College 208
127 210 Dillard University 200
128 212 St. Bonaventure University 206
129 213 LaSalle University 203
130 214 Whitworth University 209
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The full rankings of over 400 schools are available in the “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings”.
..
This is the second major ranking to be released since the Penn State scandal. In the previous TTMB rankings 3.42% of citations had some association with the scandal. In this survey, scandal-related citations crept up to 6.8%. Penn State’s ranking had been on an upswing since since the success of their identity campaign in 2010. Since peaking in the Top 20 in 2011, Penn State fell to No. 51 in the immediate aftermath of the scandal in 2012. Penn State’s has now recovered to its current position at No. 39, which suggests that its reputation is still suffering the effects of the Sandusky scandal.
.
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Emory in the university rankings and Claremont McKenna in the college rankings each had SAT misrepresentations made public since the last survey. Both fell in the rankings. Emory fell from No. 59 to No. 71. Claremont McKenna fell more dramatically from No. 33 to No. 75 in the College Rankings. Of course, it is open to question whether or not their drops were a direct result of their reported improprieties.
.
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Top US Service Academies for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz

This data supplements the earlier announcement of Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013 by the Global Language Monitor.

Click on this link to order the 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide covering more than 400 schools.

 

For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities by the Global Language Monitor. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings. In the College Rankings the University of Richmond also took the top spot for two years running, this time topping a steadily rising Bucknell.
.

In the Top Service Academies category, West Point lept over Annapolis for the No. 1 spot by gaining sixteen spots in the overall rankings. Navy was followed by the Virginia Military Institute (up thirteen spots), Air Force, Coast Guard, and the US Merchant Marine Academy. (The Citadel was not included in this ranking because the Carnegie Commission considers the Institute a university.)

.s
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.

The following details the Top US Academies for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz. 2013 Category Rank, Overall Rank, Institution, Overall 2012 Ranking*

2013 Overall Top Colleges – Military/Service 2012
1 3 United States Military Academy 19
2 13 United States Naval Academy 24
3 23 Virginia Military Institute 36
4 41 United States Air Force Academy 35
5 137 US Coast Guard Academy 75
6 180 United States Merchant Marine Academy 197

*The Citadel was not included in this ranking because the Carnegie Commission considers the school a university.

Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor
Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Top US Art/Design/Music Schools by TrendTopper MediaBuzz for 2013

 

This data supplements the earlier announcement of Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013 by the Global Language Monitor.

Click to order ”The 2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Guide”.

To read about all Top Universities and Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Public Universities, go here.
To see the Top Private Universities, go here.
To see the Top Engineering Institutions, go here.
To see the Top Religion-related Universities, go here.
To see the Top Public Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Private Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Military/Service Academies, go here.
For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities by the Global Language Monitor. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings.
.
In the Top US Art/Design/Music School category, there are twenty-one institutions. SAIC (the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) topped the list, ranking at No. 5 overall, the highest in the overall college category in the history of the rankings. Following SAIC were the Pratt Institute and the Cooper Union, RISD and the Juilliard School. Therefore three of the top five schools were located in city of New York. Coming in at No. 6 was Boston’s Berklee College of Music with the largest jump in the rankings among it peers (up some 85 spots). Rounding out the Top Ten were the San Francisco Art Institute, University of the Arts-PA, the California Institute of the Arts, and the California College of the Arts. the S.F Art Institute was up twenty-three spots and the California College of the Arts was up forty-two.
.s
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.

The following details the Top US Art/Design/Music School category for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

 

2013 Art/Design/Music Rank, Overall Rank, Institution, Overall 2012 Ranking

2013 Overall Top Colleges – Music/Art/Design 2012
1 5 School of the Art Institute of Chicago 17
2 10 Pratt Institute 10
3 12 The Cooper Union 9
4 16 Rhode Island School of Design 37
5 45 The Juilliard School 15
6 69 Berklee College of Music 154
7 89 San Francisco Art Institute 112
8 93 University of the Arts, PA 102
9 95 California Institute of the Arts 119
10 102 California College of the Arts 146
11 118 SUNY—Purchase 55
12 140 Boston Conservatory 153
13 150 New England Conservatory of Music 180
14 154 San Francisco Conservatory of Music 174
15 157 Curtis Institute of Music 183
16 160 University of North Carolina School of the Arts 167
17 167 Cleveland Institute of Music 156
18 171 Fashion Institute of Technology 31
19 178 Minneapolis College of Art and Design 62
20 183 School of the Visual Arts 32
21 200 Corcoran College of Art and Design 139

 

To read about all Top Universities and Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Public Universities, go here.
To see the Top Private Universities, go here.
To see the Top Engineering Institutions, go here.
To see the Top Religion-related Universities, go here.
To see the Top Public Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Private Colleges, go here.
To see the Top Military/Service Academies, go here.

Click her to download “2016 TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings”!

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The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Top US Engineering Universities for 2013

 

This data supplements the earlier announcement of Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013 by the Global Language Monitor.

For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities by the Global Language Monitor. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings.
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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology again tops all US universities as well as receiving the Top Engineering School accolade. MIT was followed by Virginia Tech. the Georgia Institute of Technology. Purdue University, and Texas A&M University. Rounding out the Top Ten were Carnegie Mellon University, the Missouri U. of Science and Technology, Rice University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Rochester Institute of Technology. The largest mover was Purdue, moving up some fourteen places.
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Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.

The following details the Top US Engineering Schools for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

2013 Engineering Rank, Overall Rank, Institution, Overall 2012 Ranking

 

2013 Overall Top Universities -Engineering 2012
1 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1
2 17 Virginia Tech 19
3 21 Georgia Institute of Technology 23
4 28 Purdue University 42
5 40 Texas A&M University 47
6 51 Carnegie Mellon University 45
7 72 Missouri U. of Science and Technology 78
8 78 Rice University 72
9 96 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 97
10 98 Rochester Inst. of Technology 108
11 119 Illinois Institute of Technology 123
12 139 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo 172
13 149 New Jersey Institute of Technology 157
14 157 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. 163
15 160 Stevens Institute of Technology 148
16 161 Colorado School of Mines 150
17 162 Stetson University 165
18 167 Worcester Polytechnic Institute 120
19 176 Michigan Technological University 180
20 209 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology 159

 

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Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

 

Top US Religion-related Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz for 2013

This data supplements the earlier announcement of Top US Colleges and Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz Spring 2013 by the Global Language Monitor.

Click on this link ”Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the report covering more than 400 schools.

.

For the second year in a row, MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking of American colleges and universities by the Global Language Monitor. This is the second time that a technical institute has topped the rankings.
.
In the Religion-related category, there are forty-three self-identified universities. Boston College nipped Georgetown for the Top Spot followed by Notre Dame, Loyola Maryland and Loyola Chicago. Baylor University came in at No. 6 and led fellow Christian universities Souther Methodist University, Texas Christian University and Liberty into the Top 20. Brandeis University was the top Jewish University, while Brighan Young represented LDS.
.s
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.

The following details the Top US Religion-related Universities for 2013 by TrendTopper MediaBuzz. 2013 Religion-related Rank, Overall Rank, Institution, Overall 2012 Ranking

2013 Overall Top Religious 2012
1 25 Boston College 26
2 35 Georgetown University 25
3 42 University of Notre Dame 53
4 75 Loyola University Maryland 154
5 76 Loyola University Chicago 90
6 85 Baylor University 73
7 86 Fordham University 83
8 87 Southern Methodist University 87
9 97 DePaul University 102
10 99 Marquette University 95
11 103 Santa Clara University 103
12 104 Brandeis University 99
13 106 Brigham Young University—Provo 63
14 112 Texas Christian University 98
15 114 Liberty University 114
16 115 St. Mary’s College of California 112
17 117 Catholic University of America 116
18 123 St Louis University 118
19 129 Loyola University New Orleans 134
20 133 St. Joseph’s University 132
21 138 Loyola Marymount University 153
22 139 Yeshiva University 129
23 147 St. Catherine University 121
24 148 Providence College 127
25 152 Gonzaga University 138
25 158 Xavier University of Louisiana 181
26 165 Iona College 178
27 166 Manhattan College 158
28 169 St. Mary’s University of San Antonio 188
29 172 Abilene Christian University 170
30 175 Fairfield University 174
31 177 St Johns University NY 143
32 178 Xavier University 89
33 181 University of Dallas 185
34 183 University of Scranton 179
35 188 Oral Roberts University 187
36 195 Sacred Heart University 183
37 200 John Carroll University 164
38 201 University of Portland 195
39 202 Augsburg College 210
40 203 Manhattanville College 204
41 208 St Edward’s University 197
42 213 St. Bonaventure University 206
43 214 LaSalle University 203
..
Click on this link “Higher Education 2013 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings” to order the the full report covering more than 400 schools. The report features analysis of college and university brand equity, the first brand affiliation measurements of MOOCs, fallout from scandals, rankings momentum and rankings velocity, and top schools by class.
.
About TrendTopper MediaBuzz
GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz analysis as a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. In the rapidly changing communications and media environment of the early 21st Century, you cannot rely on telephone surveys, at-home interviews, newspaper clippings or television mentions in order to measure the value of a brand. Today the methodology must encompass the Twitters and YouTubes of the world as well as the tens of millions of blogs, the billions of web pages, as well as the top global print and electronic media.
.
This enormous sample simply cannot be tampered with because no single institution has the ability to influence, let alone corrupt, data streaming from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of points of origin. TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that “normalizes” the data and allows us to make statistically-significant comparisons among the various measurements. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that will allow you to gauge the relative values differing institutions are assigned by consumers, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.
.
The Top Colleges and Universities were also ranked by “Media Momentum”, defined as its largest change in Media Buzz from the end of the last survey and the largest change in media citations in the previous nine months. The study is longitudinal in nature with the latest analysis completed January 8, 2012.
.
About the Global Language Monitor
Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor is a global media consulting organization that provides brand management analytics for colleges and universities. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Top 415 US Colleges and Universities Spring 2012

Summer/Spring 2012 Rankings

No. 1 MIT first Tech School to top rankings

Game changing OpenCourseWare propels MIT to the highest score ever measured

Top 415 US Colleges and Universities (Six Universities Added April 6th)

Volatility evident as educational consumers are presented with more choices

Penn State stumbles but holds onto a top ranking

Richmond Tops all Colleges

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Austin, Texas, April 4, 2012 (Updated April 16) – MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities by Internet

Media Buzz according to the Global Language Monitor.

This was the first time a technical institute topped the rankings; MIT did so by the largest distance ever measure in the history of the TrendTopper Rankings.

Also, in the first major rankings since the Penn State scandal, the school stumbled but held onto a top ranking.

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This is the eighth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding five years; the rankings are conducted every nine months.

In the University Division, MIT was followed by Harvard, with the highest PQI differential between No. 1 and No, 2 ever recorded. The University of Chicago took its usual position in the Top Ten, this year at No. 3, followed by Columbia University and past No. 1, the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Always strong Cornell moved up to No. 6, while UCLA took the top spot in California besting Stanford. Yale and the University of Texas-Austin Rounded out the Top Ten.

MIT gained the top spot apparently from the global buzz surrounding their announcement of their OpenCourseWare program. OpenCourseWare povides the same information available to MIT students to the world-at-large. Not only can anyone, anywhere take M.I.T. courses online free of charge, they can also earn certificates certifying mastery of the subject matter.

If the book does not download automatically, call 1.512.801.6823 and specify 1) the Fall/Winter Guide Student Edition, 2) the Spring/Summer Student Edition, or 3) The Enrollment Management Edition, for college executives who need to know the complete data for their school and that of their competitors.

“The higher education world is in the midst of a major upheaval that has only begun to sort itself out. You can’t have an institution of MIT’s stature give away its product for free, or millions of students opting for on-line schools or educations provided by for-profit organization, and of course the globalization of higher ed and not record significant change. In fact you need a seismograph to better understand the shifting of the educational plates, once long thought stable,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. This is the fifth year and eighth edition of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings.

Penn State’s stumble came in the wake of the child sex-abuse scandal in November that tarnished the legend of one of the most revered, and successful, major college football programs in the nation. Of concern to GLM was whether the scandal would dramatically increase the number of web citations, however the opposite was the case, as happened when Harvard took a massive hit to its endowment a few years ago. Significantly, only 3.42 percent of the global citations were considered of negative sentiment, so Penn State held onto a high ranking.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 215 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.

The Top Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz with current ranking and change from last ranking follow:

1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (5)

2. Harvard University (-1)

3. University of Chicago (+4)

4. Columbia University (0)

5. University of Wisconsin—Madison (+9)

6. Cornell University (+4)

7. University of California—Los Angeles (+10)

8. Stanford University (-1)

9. Yale University (+4)

10. University of Texas—Austin (-2)

11. University of Washington (0)

12. University of Pennsylvania (+4)

13. University of Michigan—Ann Arbor (-3)

14. University of California–Berkeley (-12)

15. Princeton University (+1)

16. Ohio State University—Columbus (+13)

17. University of California — Davis (+2)

18. Indiana University—Bloomington (+6)

19. Virginia Tech (+18)

20. New York University (+3)

21. Duke University (+6)

22. University of California—San Diego (+3)

23. Georgia Institute of Technology (-2)

24. Johns Hopkins University (+7)

25. University of Virginia (+11)


For all 210 Universities and Master-degree granting colleges, go here.

University of Richmond tops all colleges

In the college rankings the University of Richmond completed its long climb to the top.

Reflecting the healthy distribution of ‘Little Ivies’ across the nation landscape, Richmond is the sixth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began, which now have been represented by the South (Richmond and Davidson), the West (Colorado College), the East (Williams and Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking. Richmond Williams switched places with Smith, Bucknell and Union coming on strong. Amherst, Colorado College, Oberlin College, The Cooper Union and the Pratt Institute rounded out the Top Ten.

The Top Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz with current ranking and change from last ranking follow:

1. University of Richmond (+2)

2. Williams College (+1)

3. Smith College (+18)

4. Bucknell University (+19)

5. Union College (+3)

6. Amherst (+13)

7. Colorado College (+21)

8. Oberlin College (+20)

9. The Cooper Union (+28)

10. Pratt Institute (+12)

11. Colgate University (+37)

12. Wellesley College (+14)

13. Occidental College (+27)

14. Middlebury College (+16)

15. The Juilliard School (+8)

16. Davidson College (+26)

17. School of the Art Institute of Chicago (+22)

18. Pomona College (+6)

19. United States Military Academy (+24)

20. Vassar College (+29)

21. Emerson College (+45)

22. Bowdoin College (+17)

23. Carleton College (+9)

24. United States Naval Academy (+32)

25. Hamilton College (+38)

.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 210 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.

Unlike other college rankings, specialty schools such as Julliard, SAIC, and the Cooper Union, the service academies, business, tech schools are included in the rankings. Also incorporated into the rankings are ‘for profit” (University of Phoenix) and online institutions, such as Capella and Walden. This is to provide true comparisons between and among the various types of post-secondary institutions now available to the discerning educational consumers. The full rankings include positive or negative movement, and MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that reveal how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other competitors.

Methodology

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of March 2012, with a December snapshot as well as the last day of the previous surveys as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 175,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

What Others are Saying:

Colleges, Ranked by ‘Media Buzz’

By Eric Hoover

A savvy enrollment manager once told me that a crucial part of his job was getting his college’s name in newspapers and magazines. After all, he said, the more people see an institution’s name, the more familiar it becomes, and the more attractive it seems to prospective students.

He was describing “buzz,” something most colleges crave. In case you didn’t know, the Global Language Monitor will measure it for you.

The Summer / Spring 2012 Edition now includes over 400 schools, including specialty, Art, Design, Music, online, and for-profit institutions. It includes positive or negative movement vs the competition. It also ranks school by MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that tells how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other colleges.

 

Top Colleges Spring 2012

Summer/Spring 2012 Rankings

No. 1 MIT first Tech School to top rankings

Game changing OpenCourseWare propels MIT to the highest score ever measured

.

Volatility evident as educational consumers are presented with more choices

Penn State stumbles but holds onto a top ranking

.

Richmond Tops all Colleges

Austin, Texas, April 4, 2012 – MIT topped Harvard for the top ranking of American universities by Internet Media Buzz according to the Global Language Monitor. This was the first time a technical institute topped the rankings; MIT did so by the largest distance ever measured in the history of the TrendTopper Rankings. Also, in the first major rankings since the Penn State scandal, the school stumbled but held onto a top ranking. This is the eighth TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranking over the preceding five years. The rankings are conducted every nine months.

In the University Division, MIT was followed by Harvard, with the highest PQI differential between No. 1 and No, 2 ever recorded. The University of Chicago took its’ usual position in the Top Ten, this year at No. 3, followed by Columbia University and past No. 1, the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Always strong Cornell moved up to No. 6, while UCLA took the top spot in California besting Stanford. Yale and the University of Texas-Austin Rounded out the Top Ten.

MIT gained the top spot apparently from the global buzz surrounding their announcement of their OpenCourseWare program. OpenCourseWare povides the same information available to MIT students to the world-at-large. Not only can anyone, anywhere take M.I.T. courses online free of charge, they can also earn certificates certifying mastery of the subject matter.

“The higher education world is in the midst of a major upheaval that has only begun to sort itself out. You can’t have an institution of MIT’s stature give away its product for free, or millions of students opting for on-line schools or educations provided by for-profit organization, and of course the globalization of higher ed and not record significant change. In fact you need a seismograph to better understand the shifting of the educational plates, once long thought stable,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. This is the fifth year and eighth edition of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings.Penn State’s stumble came in the wake of the child sex-abuse scandal in November that tarnished the legend of one of the most revered, and successful, major college football programs in the nation. Of concern to GLM was whether the scandal would dramatically increase the number of web citations, however the opposite was the case, as happened when Harvard took a massive hit to its endowment a few years ago. Significantly, only 3.42 percent of the global citations were considered of negative sentiment, so Penn State held onto a high ranking.The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 215 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.The Top Universities with current ranking and change from last ranking follow:

1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (5)

2. Harvard University (-1)

3. University of Chicago (+4)

4. Columbia University (0)

5. University of Wisconsin—Madison(+9)

6. Cornell University (+4)

7. University of California—Los Angeles (+10)

8. Stanford University(-1)

9. Yale University (+4)

10. University of Texas—Austin(-2)

11. University of Washington (0)

12. University of Pennsylvania (+4)

13. University of Michigan—Ann Arbor(-3)

14. University of California–Berkeley (-12)

15. Princeton University (+1)

16. Ohio State University—Columbus (+13)

17. University of California — Davis (+2)

18. Indiana University—Bloomington (+6)

19. Virginia Tech (+18)

20. New York University (+3)

21. Duke University (+6)

22. University of California—San Diego(+3)

23. Georgia Institute of Technology (-2)

24. Johns Hopkins University (+7)

25. University of Virginia (+11)

For all 210 Universities and Master-degree granting colleges, go here.

University of Richmond tops all colleges

In the college rankings the University of Richmond completed its long climb to the top.

.

Reflecting the healthy distribution of ‘Little Ivies’ across the nation landscape, Richmond is the sixth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began, which now have been represented by the South (Richmond and Davidson), the West (Colorado College), the East (Williams and Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking. Richmond Williams switched places with Smith, Bucknell and Union coming on strong. Amherst, Colorado College, Oberlin College, The Cooper Union and the Pratt Institute rounded out the Top Ten.

The Top Universities by TrendTopper MediaBuzz with current ranking and change from last ranking follow:

1. University of Richmond (+2)

2.Williams College (+1)

3.Smith College (+18)

4.Bucknell University (+19)

5.Union College (+3)

6.Amherst (+13)

7.Colorado College (+21)

8.Oberlin College (+20)

9.The Cooper Union (+28)

10.Pratt Institute (+12)

11. Colgate University (+37)

12. Wellesley College (+14)

13. Occidental College (+27)

14. Middlebury College (+16)

15. The Juilliard School (+8)

16. Davidson College (+26)

17. School of the Art Institute of Chicago (+22)

18. Pomona College (+6)

19. United States Military Academy (+24)

20. Vassar College (+29)

21. Emerson College (+45)

22. Bowdoin College (+17)

23. Carleton College (+9)

24. United States Naval Academy (+32)

25. Hamilton College (+38)

For a complete list of all 200 colleges, go here.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 210 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.

Unlike other college rankings, specialty schools such as Julliard, SAIC, and the Cooper Union, the service academies, business, tech schools are included in the rankings. Also incorporated into the rankings are ‘for profit” (University of Phoenix) and online institutions, such as Capella and Walden. This is to provide true comparisons between and among the various types of post-secondary institutions now available to the discerning educational consumers. The full rankings include positive or negative movement, and MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that reveal how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other competitors.

Methodology

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of March 2012, with a December snapshot as well as the last day of the previous surveys as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 175,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

What Others are Saying:

Colleges, Ranked by ‘Media Buzz’

By Eric Hoover

A savvy enrollment manager once told me that a crucial part of his job was getting his college’s name in newspapers and magazines. After all, he said, the more people see an institution’s name, the more familiar it becomes, and the more attractive it seems to prospective students.

He was describing “buzz,” something most colleges crave. In case you didn’t know, the Global Language Monitor will measure it for you.

.

Fall 2010/Winter 2012 Edition

Top 300 US Colleges by Internet Media Buzz:

.

Harvard Returns to the top

By: admin
Published: August 30th, 2011

Harvard Returns to the top, beating Northwestern and Berkeley

 

But Big Ten Beats Ivies: 8-6 in the Top 50

 

Williams Tops Richmond as No.1 in the College Category

 

Austin, Texas, September 3 – After four tries, Harvard returned to the top ranking of American universities by Internet Media Buzz, edging out a strong challenge by Northwestern. The University of California, Berkeley, Columbia, Caltech, and MIT – all finishing within 1% of each other – took the No. 3 through No. 6 positions. Stanford returned to the Top Ten at No. 7, followed by the ever-strong Chicago, the University of Texas, and Cornell.

Following were Michigan, the University of Washington, Penn State, Yale, and Wisconsin. Rounding out the Top Twenty were Princeton, Penn, UCLA, Cal Davis, and Georgia Tech.

“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure an institution’s perceived value using the same methodologies used to compare any other products of value, such as BMW vs. Mercedes,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of the Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.”

In a remarkable demonstration of the growing influence of the Public Ivies, some fourteen of the Top Thirty schools are public institutions, and now include eight Big Ten schools, six from the Ivy League (Brown and Dartmouth were the exceptions), three Technological Institutes – and four from California’s fabled University system.

Overall, the University of California system, as a whole continues to dwarf all other academic associations, leagues and conferences. This is a fine tribute to a system that has had to endure a continued series of budget cuts and cutbacks.

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).

 

The Top 25 Universities by Internet Media Buzz

Rank/University/Last/Comment

1. Harvard University (3) – Dr. Faust sets things aright and Harvard again assumes the No. 1 spot in the survey.

2. Northwestern University (31) – Catapults to No.2 while leading the Big Ten charge up the rankings.

3. University of California, Berkeley (8) – Cal considers itself THE University of California and the rankings back this up.

4. Columbia University (5) – Columbia has never finished out of the Top 10 in the TrendTopper rankings.

5. California Institute of Technology (19) – CalTech nips its East Coast competitor for top tech honors.

6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (4) – The former ‘Boston Tech’ rejected Harvard’s repeated entreaties to merge in the late 19th century.

7. Stanford University (11) – The former ‘Harvard of the West’ has long emerged from Cantabrigia’s fabled shadow.

8. University of Chicago (2) – Dropped out of the Big Ten in the late 1930s; loss of big-time football doesn’t seem to have hurt their rankings.

9. University of Texas, Austin (10) – It new branding, “What starts here, changes the world’ is more than a slogan.

10. Cornell University (7) – Few know that the Ivy titan is also a Land Grant institution.

11. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (6) – Took top honors twice in previous surveys.

12. University of Washington (17) – U Dub, as it is affectionately known, is the emerging powerhouse of the Northwest.

13. Pennsylvania State University (24) — Penn State’s new identity campaign has evidently been quite successful.

14. Yale University (9) – Vassar declined an invitation to merge with Yale in 1966.

15. University of Wisconsin, Madison (1) – Had a very strong global media run during the previous cycle.

16. Princeton University (12) – The First Lady’s Alma Mater was originally known as the College of New Jersey.

17. University of Pennsylvania (22) – The Wharton School greatly strengthens Penn’s brand equity.

18. University of California, Los Angeles (16) – Tops in LaLa Land, though USC is making great strides forward.

19. University of California, Davis (13) – Originally established as the agricultural extension of UC Berkeley known as the University Farm.

20. Georgia Institute of Technology (27) – The Yellow Jackets ramble into the Top 20.

21. Georgetown University (14) – Once again, the Top Catholic University in the land.

22. New York University (18) – Growing global ambitions reflected in the global media.

23. Indiana University, Bloomington (46) – Steadily gaining in prestige and the rankings reflect it.

24. Boston College (39) – A generation ago, the Flutie Effect launched the school on its present stellar trajectory.

25. University of California, San Diego (23) – UCSD receives about a billion dollars a year in research grants.

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The Top 25 Colleges by TrendTopper MediaBuzz

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Williams College of Massachusetts as a strong No. 1 in the College Division. (Little Three companion schools Amherst and Wesleyan claimed the No. 7 and thirteen spots, respectively.)

Williams is the fifth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began, which now have been represented by the South (Davidson), the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

In another first, three of the Claremont Colleges finished in the Top Ten: No. 4 Claremont McKenna, No. 5 Harvey Mudd, and No. 6 Pomona. In addition, another Claremont College, Scripps — the Women’s College, finished at No. 18.

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Rank / Colleges Fall 2011

1. Williams College – The Ephs (or is it Blue Cows?) set the standard, once again, however a first in Internet MediaBuzz..

2. University of Richmond — Richmond looking stronger and stronger in the classroom, the athletic field and the media.

3. Union College – A sometimes overlooked gem of a school making strides in the Internet age.

4. Claremont McKenna College – CMC marks the beginning of the Claremont Colleges surge.

5. Harvey Mudd College – One of the top technical schools in the nation finally getting it due.

6. Pomona College – Perhaps the most akin to Williams on the list (minus the SoCal climate and beaches).

7. Wesleyan University – Firmly wedged between Williams and Amherst, as is its usual fate.

8. The Juilliard School – A school that truly deserves to be in the nation’s Top Ten, though it is often relegated to ‘Unranked’ or ‘Other’ categories.

9. Carleton College – A past No.1 that continues to gain in global reputation.

10. Bates College – With Colby and Bowdoin, one of the three little Ivies from the state of Maine.

11. Pratt Institute – Pratt’s mission is to educate artists and creative professionals and, indeed, that is what it does.

12. Amherst College – Always lurking near the top of the Liberal Arts College rankings.

13. Wellesley College – The only Woman’s College to achieve No. 1 in any comprehensive national rankings.

14. Bryn Mawr College – Katy Hepburn would be proud of how the little school has come of age (125thanniversary).

15. Middlebury College – Such a large global footprint for such a small school.

16. Bowdoin College – Used to boast of being the first US college to witness the sunrise.

17. Smith College – The women’s school of the Five Colleges Consortium around Amherst, Massachusetts.

18. Scripps College – Yet another of the Claremont Colleges to emerge into the top ranks.

19. Bucknell University – Bucknell is the largest private Liberal Arts college in the nation and its outsized reputation is beginning to reflect this fact.

20. Oberlin College – From the Arb to the Arch the college holds many firsts in American academic history, such as the first co-ed college to graduate a woman.

21. Colorado College – CC, of Block Plan fame, was the first No. 1 west of the Mississippi.

22. School of the Art Institute of Chicago – SAIC deserves to be in the top reaches of any serious collegiate ranking.

23. Babson College – Specialized in entrepreneurship before entrepreneurship was cool.

24. United States Military Academy – Army and Navy were considered part of the traditional Ivy League a century before the Ivy Group sports conference was formed.

25. United States Air Force Academy – Service Academies are amazingly unranked by US News and others

The Top Specialty Schools.

Top Engineering Schools: CalTech, MIT, Georgia Tech (College: Harvey Mudd)

Top Online/For Profit Schools: the University of Phoenix.

Top Business School: Babson College

Top Christian School: Wheaton College, IL

Top Military Academy: United States Military Academy

Top Multi-disciplinary Art & Design School: Pratt Institute

Top School of Art: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)

Top Music School: the Julliard School

Top Catholic University: Georgetown University

Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross

 

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the Blogosphere, Social Media as well as the Top 75,000 print and electronic media sites.

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2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet “Brand Equity” Rankings

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wisconsin Tops Chicago and Harvard in Universities; Davidson over Occidental and Williams in Colleges

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Historic Re-alignment of what is considered an ‘elite’ school

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AUSTIN, Texas December 30, 2010 — The University of Wisconsin at Madison, one of the nation’s most storied land-grant institutions, leapt over Chicago, Harvard, MIT, Columbia and two-time defending No. 1 (and fellow Big Ten academic powerhouse) Michigan, as the Top University according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet analysis released by the Global Language Monitor.

There have now had three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin. As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten. Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, each moving up ten or more spots.

“The ‘flight to quality’ continues unabated. The savvy consumer of the education marketplace appears centered on the price-sensitive ‘public ivies’ and technology-centered schools, as well as on-line alternatives. The solidly performing ‘little Ivies’ are now now fairly well distributed across the country– and are holding their own,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.” One aftermath of the recent recession is that consumers understand that it is smart not to accept ‘retail pricing’ and that colleges are no different in this regard from any other institution.”

For Previous TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings go here

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of December with a mid-year snapshot, and the last day of 2009 as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes Narrative Tracking technology that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 75,000 print and electronic media. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

The Top Twenty Universities by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

1. Univ. of Wisconsin—Madison

2. University of Chicago

3. Harvard University

4. Mass. Institute of Technology

5. Columbia University

6. Univ. of Michigan—Ann Arbor

7. Cornell University

8. University of California–Berkeley

9. Yale University

10. University of Texas—Austin

11. Stanford University

12. Princeton University

13. University of California — Davis

14. Georgetown University

15. Duke University

16. University of California—Los Angeles

17. University of Washington

18. New York University

19. California Institute of Technology

20. Johns Hopkins University

The Top Ten Universities now include four Ivy League schools, four Public Ivy’s (two from the Big Ten), one technological institute and the always formidable University of Chicago.

We have now three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three Years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin.

As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten.

Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, all moving up ten or more spots.

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Davidson College of North Carolina. This is the fourth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began which now have been represented by the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

Davidson, as well as L.A.’s Occidental College (where President Obama spent his first year in college) both leapt over the Little Three (Amherst, Williams and Wesleyan University) as well as all three previous No. 1’s: Carleton College, Wellesley College, and Colorado College.

The Top Twenty Colleges by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

1. Davidson College

2. Occidental College

3. Williams College

4. Wesleyan University

5. Carleton College

6. Amherst College

7. Bucknell University

8. Oberlin College

9. United States Air Force Academy

10. Pomona College

11. Wellesley College

12. Juilliard School of Music

13. Vassar College

14. Pratt Institute

15. United States Military Academy

16. Smith College

17. Bowdoin College

18. College of the Holy Cross

19. Claremont McKenna College

20. Bryn Mawr College

The Top Ten among colleges included Bucknell, Oberlin, Pomona and the US Air Force Academy. The Top Twenty included the Little Three, four of the former Seven Sisters (though Vassar is now co-ed), two Patriot League schools, two US Service Academies, the top Catholic College in the US (College of the Holy Cross), two of the Claremont Colleges, and two schools that are not included in the traditional college rankings: the Juilliard School and Pratt Institute, both in New York City.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are the only to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Design, Music, as well as Internet-based (and for-profit) All these were included in the College category with the exception of the online university, which was assigned to the University category.

In addition, the BOC notation signifies Best of Class; it is noted for those schools that are either first in the overall ranking, or first in a specific classification.

Top in the US/Best of Class (BOC) designation was awarded for:

• Top University: University of Wisconsin, Madison

• Top College: Davidson College

• Top Engineering Hybrid School: The Cooper Union

• Top Business: Babson College

• Top Art and Design School: Pratt Institute

• Top Art School: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)

• Top Music School: The Juilliard School

• Top Online University: University of Phoenix

• Top Christian School: Wheaton College, Illinois

• Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross

• Top Catholic University: Georgetown University

• Top Service Academy: United States Air Force Academy

• Top Outré College (New Category): Oberlin

The rankings also include the Biggest Movers for both colleges and universities and the Top States for Top Colleges.

The Universities that gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

1. Worcester Polytechnic Institute

2. Miami University—Oxford

3. Lehigh University

4. Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

5. University of California—Irvine

6. CUNY-Queens

7. Georgetown University

8. Mills College

9. University of Denver

10. Rice University

The Colleges that have gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

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1. Smith College

2. Trinity College CT

3. St. John’s College MD

4. School of Visual Arts (NY)

5. Fashion Institute of Technology

6. St Lawrence University

7. Swarthmore College

8. Hampshire College

9. Gettysburg College

10. Oberlin College

In addition, each of the forty-two states with top colleges is listed with the combined rankings of colleges and universities within the state.

The top five states for top colleges, along with the number of top colleges within the states include:

1. New York (45)

2. California (30)

3. Massachusetts (25)

4. Pennsylvania (22)

5. Illinois (12)

The 2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet Rankings contains all of the above information on the Top 300 US Colleges and Universities, with added detail.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

The 53 page guide includes the following:

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

GLM’s College Reputation Management Services are part of our TrendTopper Branding Services.

To learn more, click here.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz University Rankings for Spring/Summer 2012

Five Universities were added to the list on April 6th.

Below are the top 215 University and Master-degree granting institutions for Spring/Summer 2012 ranked by their Internet Brand Equity as determined by GLM’s analytical methodologies.

 

The Top 215 Universities by Internet MediaBuzz for Spring/Summer 2012

Rank / University

1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2 Harvard University
3 University of Chicago
4 Columbia University
5 University of Wisconsin—Madison
6 Cornell University
7 University of California—Los Angeles
8 Stanford University
9 Yale University
10 University of Texas—Austin
11 University of Washington
12 University of Pennsylvania
13 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor
14 University of California–Berkeley
15 Princeton University
16 Ohio State University—Columbus
17 University of California — Davis
18 Indiana University—Bloomington
19 Virginia Tech
20 New York University
21 Duke University
22 University of California—San Diego
23 Georgia Institute of Technology
24 Johns Hopkins University
25 University of Virginia
26 Georgetown University
27 Boston College
28 University of Georgia
29 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill
30 Boston University
31 George Washington University
32 Northwestern University
33 University of Southern California
34 University of Pittsburgh
35 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign
36 University of Minnesota
37 Brown University
38 University of Miami
39 University of Phoenix
40 University of California—Santa Barbara
41 Michigan State University
42 California Institute of Technology
43 Purdue University
44 University of California—Irvine
45 University of Iowa
46 Carnegie Mellon University
47 Vanderbilt University
48 Texas A&M University
49 University of Maryland—College Park
50 Syracuse University
51 Pennsylvania State University
52 University of Rochester
53 University of California—Santa Cruz
54 University of Notre Dame
55 University of Missouri—Columbia
56 University of California—Riverside
57 Iowa State University
58 Rutgers, the State University of NJ
59 University of Colorado—Boulder
60 Emory University
61 University of Oregon
62 University of Florida
63 University of Massachusetts—Amherst
64 Brigham Young University—Provo
65 Auburn University
66 University of Delaware
67 Washington University in St. Louis
68 Case Western Reserve University
69 University of Kentucky
70 University of Tennessee
71 University of South Carolina—Columbia
72 Tufts University
73 Rice University
74 Dartmouth College
75 Baylor University
76 Northeastern University
77 University of Connecticut
78 Wake Forest University
79 University of Kansas
80 Missouri U. of Science and Technology
81 University of Arizona
82 North Carolina State University—Raleigh
83 University of Vermont
84 University of Oklahoma
85 Fordham University
86 Arizona State University
87 Tuskegee University
88 Tulane University
89 Southern Methodist University
90 Howard University
91 Villanova University
92 Xavier University
93 Loyola University, Chicago
94 Lehigh University
95 Miami University—Ohio
96 Drexel University
97 University of Denver
98 Marquette University
99 College of William and Mary
100 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
101 Texas Christian University
102 Brandeis University
103 University of Dayton
104 James Madison University
105 DePaul University
106 Washington State University
107 Santa Clara University
108 Colorado State University
109 University of New Hampshire
110 Kansas State University
111 American University
112 Rochester Inst. of Technology
113 Truman State University
114 University of Alabama
115 University of Arkansas
116 St. Mary’s College of California
117 University of San Diego
118 Liberty University
119 Hofstra University
120 Catholic University of America
121 SUNY—Stony Brook
122 St Louis University
123 CUNY-Queens
124 Worcester Polytechnic Institute
125 St. Catherine University
126 Creighton University
127 Illinois Institute of Technology
128 Towson University
129 Californis State U — Long Beach
130 Kaplan University
131 Providence College
132 Pepperdine University
133 Yeshiva University
134 Drake University
135 Butler University
136 St. Joseph’s University
137 Texas State U — San Marcos
138 Loyola University New Orleans
139 CUNY-Brooklyn
140 University of the Pacific
141 Clemson University
142 Gonzaga University
143 CUNY-Hunter College
144 CUNY-Baruch
145 Walden University
146 Seattle University
147 Ithaca College
148 St Johns University NY
149 Montclair State University
150 Binghamton– SUNY
151 Clark University
152 Capella University
153 Stevens Institute of Technology
154 Emerson College
155 Colorado School of Mines
156 Chapman University
157 University of Tulsa
158 Loyola Marymount University
159 Loyola College Maryland
160 Quinnipiac University
161 University of Redlands
162 New Jersey Institute of Technology
163 Manhattan College
164 Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
165 Mills College
166 Elon University
167 Bradley University
168 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U.
169 John Carroll University
170 Stetson University
171 CUNY-City College
172 The Citadel
173 Bentley University
174 University at Buffalo—SUNY
175 Abilene Christian University
176 Valparaiso University
177 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo
178 Clarkson University
179 Fairfield University
180 University of San Francisco
181 Rider University
182 Morgan State University
183 Iona College
184 University of Scranton
185 Michigan Technological University
186 Xavier University of Louisiana
187 Simmons College
188 Sacred Heart University
189 Western Governors University
190 University of Dallas
191 Springfield College
192 Oral Roberts University
193 St. Mary’s University of San Antonio
194 Ramapo College
195 College of Charleston
196 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
197 Evergreen State
198 Florida A&M University
199 Wagner College
200 University of Portland
201 Alfred University
202 St Edward’s University
203 Rollins College
204 Baldwin – Wallace College
205 Dillard University (LA)
206 Rowan University
207 University of Mary Washington
208 LaSalle University
209 Manhattanville College
210 University of Northern Iowa
211 St. Bonaventure University
212 Hamline University
213 Hood College
214 Whitworth University
215 Augsburg College

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 210 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.

Unlike other college rankings, specialty schools such as Julliard, SAIC, and the Cooper Union, the service academies, business, tech schools are included in the rankings. Also incorporated into the rankings are ‘for profit” (University of Phoenix) and online institutions, such as Capella and Walden. This is to provide true comparisons between and among the various types of post-secondary institutions now available to the discerning educational consumers. The full rankings include positive or negative movement, and MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that reveal how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other competitors.

Methodology

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of March 2012, with a December snapshot as well as the last day of the previous surveys as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 175,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

What Others are Saying:

Colleges, Ranked by ‘Media Buzz’

By Eric Hoover

A savvy enrollment manager once told me that a crucial part of his job was getting his college’s name in newspapers and magazines. After all, he said, the more people see an institution’s name, the more familiar it becomes, and the more attractive it seems to prospective students.

He was describing “buzz,” something most colleges crave. In case you didn’t know, the Global Language Monitor will measure it for you.

 

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For the numbers behind the rankings,the why and wherefore, including the numerical analysis of the Top Colleges and Universities, the rankings and numerical analysis for the top gainers and losers, colleges ranked by velocity andmomentum (short-term and longer-term movement), click here.

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The Top Colleges by Internet MediaBuzz for Spring/Summer 2012

 

TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings Spring/Summer 2012

Below are the top 200 Liberal Arts and Colleges focusing on baccalaureate instruction for Spring/Summer 2012 ranked by their Internet Brand Equity as determined by GLM’s analytical methodologies.

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The Top Colleges by Internet MediaBuzz for Spring/Summer 2012

Rank / College

2012 Top Colleges
1 University of Richmond
2 Williams College
3 Smith College
4 Bucknell University
5 Union College
6 Amherst College
7 Colorado College
8 Oberlin College
9 The Cooper Union
10 Pratt Institute
11 Colgate University
12 Wellesley College
13 Occidental College
14 Middlebury College
15 The Juilliard School
16 Davidson College
17 School of the Art Institute of Chicago
18 Pomona College
19 United States Military Academy
20 Vassar College
21 Emerson College
22 Bowdoin College
23 Carleton College
24 United States Naval Academy
25 Hamilton College
26 Swarthmore College
27 Babson College
28 Barnard College
29 Trinity College CT
30 Lafayette College
31 Fashion Institute of Technology
32 School of Visual Arts
33 Claremont McKenna College
34 Wesleyan University
35 United States Air Force Academy
36 Virginia Military Institute
37 Rhode Island School of Design
38 St. Mary-of-the-Woods College IN
39 Guilford College
40 Reed College
41 Morehouse College
42 Bryn Mawr College
43 Bard College
44 Connecticut College
45 Concordia University Texas
46 Lawrence University
47 Southwestern University
48 Hampshire College
49 Ohio Wesleyan University
50 College of the Holy Cross
51 Mount Holyoke College
52 Gustavus Adolphus
53 Haverford College
54 Colby College
55 SUNY—Purchase
56 Dickinson College
57 Macalester College
58 Furman University
59 Drew University
60 Calvin College
61 Kenyon College
62 Minneapolis College of Art and Design
63 Washington and Lee University
64 St Lawrence University
65 Bentley College
66 Augustana College IL
67 DePauw University
68 Hobart William Smith College
69 Bates College
70 SUNY College of Technology, Alfred
71 Gettysburg College
72 Siena College
73 Harvey Mudd College
74 Simmons College
75 US Coast Guard Academy
76 Bethune-Cookman University FL
77 Skidmore College
78 St Olaf College
79 Denison University
80 Presbyterian College
81 Willamette University
82 Knox College
83 Spelman College (GA)
84 Milwaukee School of Engineering
85 Scripps College
86 Grinnell College
87 Bethel College IN
88 Augustana College SD
89 Ohio Northern University
90 Messiah College
91 Erskine College
92 Transylvania University KY
93 Sarah Lawrence College
94 Beloit College
95 Roger Williams University
96 Fisk University
97 University of Puget Sound
98 Hillsdale College
99 Alfred University
100 Randolph College (Macon) VA
101 St. Michael’s College
102 University of the Arts PA
103 Wheaton College IL
104 Centre College
105 High Point University
106 Whitman College
107 Cornell College
108 Illinois Wesleyan University
109 Muhlenberg College
110 College of St. Benedict/St John University
111 Trinity Washington University
112 San Francisco Art Institute
113 Allegheny College
114 Goucher College
115 Baldwin – Wallace College
116 Albion College
117 Florida Southern College
118 Flagler College FL
119 California Institution of the Arts
120 Wabash College
121 Rowan University
122 Pitzer College
123 Kalamazoo College
124 Wittenberg University
125 Linfield College
126 Rhodes College
127 Ursinus College
128 Earlham College
129 Wofford College
130 Hampden – Sydney College
131 Stonehill College
132 Marietta College OH
133 Coe College
134 Moravian College
135 Buena Vista University IA
136 Oklahoma Baptist College
137 Lake Forest College
138 St. John’s College MD
139 Corcoran College of Art and Design
140 Bennington College
141 Agnes Scott College
142 Lenoir-Rhyne University SC
143 Sewanee—University of the South
144 Ripon College
145 Birmingham Southern College
146 California College of the Arts
147 Elmira College
148 Loras College IA
149 Carthage College
150 Adrian College
151 Wheaton College MA
152 Susquehanna University
153 Boston Conservatory
154 Berklee College of Music
155 Endicott College
156 Cleveland Institute of Music
157 Lebanon Valley College
158 Hendrix College
159 St Mary’s College IN
160 Hanover College, IN
161 University of the Ozarks AR
162 Olin College
163 Juniata College
164 Hartwick College
165 Elizabethtown College
166 US Merchant Marine Academy
167 University of North Carolina School of the Arts
168 Westminster College PA
169 SUNY—Geneseo
170 Millsaps College
171 Franklin and Marshall College
172 United States Coast Guard Academy
173 South Dakota School of Mines
174 San Francisco Conservatory of Music
175 Lewis and Clark College
176 Berea College
177 Hood College
178 Morningside College IA
179 Sweet Briar College
180 New England Conservatory of Music
181 McMurry University TX
182 Westmont College
183 Curtis Institute of Music
184 College of New Jersey
185 Hollins University VA
186 University of Minnesota Morris
187 St Michael’s College
188 Ouachita Baptist University
189 Elizabeth City State University
190 Simon’s Rock College
191 St. John’s College NM
192 New College of Florida
193 Berry College
194 Howard Payne University TX
195 Eugene Lang College of New School U.
196 Austin College
197 United States Merchant Marine Academy
198 Washington and Jefferson College
199 LeGrange University
200 College of Wooster

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The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure near real-time movements of an institution’s reputation or ‘brand equity’, using the same techniques used to measure the appeal of any other branded product, such as luxury automobiles, or consumer electronics. For the first time GLM expanded the Rankings to over 400 schools, 210 in the University Division with another 200 in the College Division to widen the bases of comparison for the education marketplace.

Unlike other college rankings, specialty schools such as Julliard, SAIC, and the Cooper Union, the service academies, business, tech schools are included in the rankings. Also incorporated into the rankings are ‘for profit” (University of Phoenix) and online institutions, such as Capella and Walden. This is to provide true comparisons between and among the various types of post-secondary institutions now available to the discerning educational consumers. The full rankings include positive or negative movement, and MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that reveal how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other competitors.

Methodology

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of March 2012, with a December snapshot as well as the last day of the previous surveys as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 175,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

 

What Others are Saying:

Colleges, Ranked by ‘Media Buzz’

By Eric Hoover

A savvy enrollment manager once told me that a crucial part of his job was getting his college’s name in newspapers and magazines. After all, he said, the more people see an institution’s name, the more familiar it becomes, and the more attractive it seems to prospective students.

He was describing “buzz,” something most colleges crave. In case you didn’t know, the Global Language Monitor will measure it for you.

The Summer / Spring 2012 Edition now includes over 400 schools, including specialty, Art, Design, Music, online, and for-profit institutions. It includes positive or negative movement vs the competition. It also ranks school by MediaBuzz Velocity and Momentum that tells how a school’s (short-term and long-term) brand equity is increasing or decreasing against its peer group, and the other colleges.

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Harvard Returns to the top, beating Northwestern and Berkeley

But Big Ten Beats Ivies: 8-6 in the Top 50

 

Williams Tops Richmond as No.1 in the College Category

 

Austin, Texas, September 3, 2011 – After four tries, Harvard returned to the top ranking of American universities by Internet Media Buzz, edging out a strong challenge by Northwestern. The University of California, Berkeley, Columbia, Caltech, and MIT – all finishing within 1% of each other – took the No. 3 through No. 6 positions. Stanford returned to the Top Ten at No. 7, followed by the ever-strong Chicago, the University of Texas, and Cornell.

Memorial Church, Harvard
Memorial Church, Harvard

Following were Michigan, the University of Washington, Penn State, Yale, and Wisconsin. Rounding out the Top Twenty were Princeton, Penn, UCLA, Cal Davis, and Georgia Tech.

“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings measure an institution’s perceived value using the same methodologies used to compare any other products of value, such as BMW vs. Mercedes,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.”

In a remarkable demonstration of the growing influence of the Public Ivies, some fourteen of the Top Thirty schools are public institutions, and now include eight Big Ten schools, six from the Ivy League (Brown and Dartmouth were the exceptions), three Technological Institutes – and four from California’s fabled University system.

Overall, the University of California system, as a whole continues to dwarf all other academic associations, leagues and conferences. This is a fine tribute to a system that has had to endure a continued series of budget cuts and cutbacks.

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).

 

Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference

The Top 25 Universities by Internet Media Buzz

Rank/University/Last/Comment

1. Harvard University (3) – Dr. Faust sets things aright and Harvard again assumes the No. 1 spot in the survey.

2. Northwestern University (31) – Catapults to No.2 while leading the Big Ten charge up the rankings.

3. University of California, Berkeley (8) – Cal considers itself THE University of California and the rankings back this up.

4. Columbia University (5) – Columbia has never finished out of the Top 10 in the TrendTopper rankings.

5. California Institute of Technology (19) – CalTech nips its East Coast competitor for top tech honors.

6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (4) – The former ‘Boston Tech’ rejected Harvard’s repeated entreaties to merge in the late 19th century.

7. Stanford University (11) – The former ‘Harvard of the West’ has long emerged from Cantabrigia’s fabled shadow.

8. University of Chicago (2) – Dropped out of the Big Ten in the late 1930s; loss of big-time football doesn’t seem to have hurt their rankings.

9. University of Texas, Austin (10) – It new branding, “What starts here, changes the world’ is more than a slogan.

10. Cornell University (7) – Few know that the Ivy titan is also a Land Grant institution.

11. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (6) – Took top honors twice in previous surveys.

12. University of Washington (17) – U Dub, as it is affectionately known, is the emerging powerhouse of the Northwest.

13. Pennsylvania State University (24) — Penn State’s new identity campaign has evidently been quite successful.

14. Yale University (9) – Vassar declined an invitation to merge with Yale in 1966.

15. University of Wisconsin, Madison (1) – Had a very strong global media run during the previous cycle.

16. Princeton University (12) – The First Lady’s Alma Mater was originally known as the College of New Jersey.

17. University of Pennsylvania (22) – The Wharton School greatly strengthens Penn’s brand equity.

18. University of California, Los Angeles (16) – Tops in LaLa Land, though USC is making great strides forward.

19. University of California, Davis (13) – Originally established as the agricultural extension of UC Berkeley known as the University Farm.

20. Georgia Institute of Technology (27) – The Yellow Jackets ramble into the Top 20.

21. Georgetown University (14) – Once again, the Top Catholic University in the land.

22. New York University (18) – Growing global ambitions reflected in the global media.

23. Indiana University, Bloomington (46) – Steadily gaining in prestige and the rankings reflect it.

24. Boston College (39) – A generation ago, the Flutie Effect launched the school on its present stellar trajectory.

25. University of California, San Diego (23) – UCSD receives about a billion dollars a year in research grants.

The Top 25 Colleges by TrendTopper MediaBuzz

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Williams College of Massachusetts as a strong No. 1 in the College Division. (Little Three companion schools Amherst and Wesleyan claimed the No. 7 and thirteen spots, respectively.)

Williams is the fifth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began, which now have been represented by the South (Davidson), the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

In another first, three of the Claremont Colleges finished in the Top Ten: No. 4 Claremont McKenna, No. 5 Harvey Mudd, and No. 6 Pomona. In addition, another Claremont College, Scripps — the Women’s College, finished at No. 18.

The Top 25 Colleges by TrendTopper MediaBuzz

Rank / Colleges Fall 2011

Williams College Museum
Williams College Museum

1. Williams College – The Ephs (or is it Blue Cows?) set the standard, once again, however a first in Internet MediaBuzz..

2. University of Richmond — Richmond looking stronger and stronger in the classroom, the athletic field and the media.

3. Union College – A sometimes overlooked gem of a school making strides in the Internet age.

4. Claremont McKenna College – CMC marks the beginning of the Claremont Colleges surge.

5. Harvey Mudd College – One of the top technical schools in the nation finally getting it due.

6. Pomona College – Perhaps the most akin to Williams on the list (minus the SoCal climate and beaches).

7. Wesleyan University – Firmly wedged between Williams and Amherst, as is its usual fate.

8. The Juilliard School – A school that truly deserves to be in the nation’s Top Ten, though it is often relegated to ‘Unranked’ or ‘Other’ categories.

9. Carleton College – A past No.1 that continues to gain in global reputation.

10. Bates College – With Colby and Bowdoin, one of the three little Ivies from the state of Maine.

11. Pratt Institute – Pratt’s mission is to educate artists and creative professionals and, indeed, that is what it does.

12. Amherst College – Always lurking near the top of the Liberal Arts College rankings.

13. Wellesley College – The only Woman’s College to achieve No. 1 in any comprehensive national rankings.

14. Bryn Mawr College – Katy Hepburn would be proud of how the little school has come of age (125th anniversary).

15. Middlebury College – Such a large global footprint for such a small school.

16. Bowdoin College – Used to boast of being the first US college to witness the sunrise.

17. Smith College – The women’s school of the Five Colleges Consortium around Amherst, Massachusetts.

18. Scripps College – Yet another of the Claremont Colleges to emerge into the top ranks.

19. Bucknell University – Bucknell is the largest private Liberal Arts college in the nation and its outsized reputation is beginning to reflect this fact.

20. Oberlin College – From the Arb to the Arch the college holds many firsts in American academic history, such as the first co-ed college to graduate a woman.

21. Colorado College – CC, of Block Plan fame, was the first No. 1 west of the Mississippi.

22. School of the Art Institute of Chicago – SAIC deserves to be in the top reaches of any serious collegiate ranking.

23. Babson College – Specialized in entrepreneurship before entrepreneurship was cool.

24. United States Military Academy – Army and Navy were considered part of the traditional Ivy League a century before the Ivy Group sports conference was formed.

25. United States Air Force Academy — Service Academies are amazingly unranked by US News and others

The Top Specialty Schools.

Top Engineering Schools: CalTech, MIT, Georgia Tech (College: Harvey Mudd)

Top Online/For Profit Schools: the University of Phoenix.

Top Business School: Babson College

Top Christian School: Wheaton College, IL

Top Military Academy: United States Military Academy

Top Multi-disciplinary Art & Design School: Pratt Institute

Top School of Art: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)

Top Music School: the Julliard School

Top Catholic University: Georgetown University

Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings, twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Wisconsin, Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the Blogosphere, Social Media as well as the Top 75,000 print and electronic media sites.

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2011 Top 300 Colleges and Universities Ranked by Internet ‘Brand Equity’

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Wisconsin Tops Chicago and Harvard in Universities; Davidson over Occidental and Williams in Colleges

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Historic Re-alignment of what is considered an ‘elite’ school

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AUSTIN, Texas January 11, 2011 (Updated) — The University of Wisconsin at Madison, one of the nation’s most storied land-grant institutions, leaped over Chicago, Harvard, MIT, Columbia and two-time defending No. 1 (and fellow Big Ten academic powerhouse) Michigan, as the Top University according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet analysis released by the Global Language Monitor.

There have now had three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin. As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten. Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, each moving up 10 or more spots.

“The ‘flight to quality’ continues unabated. The savvy consumer of the education marketplace appears centered on the price-sensitive ‘public ivies’ and technology-centered schools, as well as on-line alternatives. The solidly performing ‘little ivies’ are now now fairly well distributed across the country– and are holding their own,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.” One aftermath of the recent recession is that consumers understand that it is smart not to accept ‘retail pricing’ and that colleges are no different in this regard from any other institution.”

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of December with a mid-year snapshot, and the last day of 2009 as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 75,000 print and electronic media. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

The Top Ten Universities by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

1. Univ. of Wisconsin—Madison

2. University of Chicago

3. Harvard University

4. Mass. Institute of Technology

5. Columbia University

6. Univ. of Michigan—Ann Arbor

7. Cornell University

8. University of California–Berkeley

9. Yale University

10. University of Texas—Austin

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The Top Twenty Universities now include four Ivy League schools, four Public Ivy’s (two from the Big Ten), one technological institute and the always formidable University of Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Davidson College of North Carolina. This is the fourth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began which now have been represented by the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

 

Davidson, as well as L.A.’s Occidental College (where President Obama spent his first year in college) both leaped over the Little Three (Amherst, Williams and Wesleyan University) as well as all three previous No. 1’s.

The Top Ten Colleges by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

1. Davidson College

2. Occidental College

3. Williams College

4. Wesleyan University

5. Carleton College

6. Amherst College

7. Bucknell University

8. Oberlin College

9. United States Air Force Academy

10. Pomona College

The Top Ten among colleges included Bucknell, Oberlin, Pomona and the US Air Force Academy. The Top Twenty included the Little Three, four of the former Seven Sisters (though Vassar is now co-ed), two Patriot League schools, two US Service Academies, the top Catholic College in the US (College of the Holy Cross), two of the Claremont Colleges, and two schools that are not included in the traditional college rankings: the Juilliard School and Pratt Institute, both in New York City.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are the only to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Design, Music, as well as Internet-based (and for-profit) All these were included in the College category with the exception of the online university, which was assigned to the University category.

Top Colleges Winter 2011

2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet “Brand Equity” Rankings

Wisconsin Tops Chicago and Harvard in Universities; Davidson over Occidental and Williams in Colleges

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Historic Re-alignment of what is considered an ‘elite’ school

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AUSTIN, Texas December 30, 2010 — The University of Wisconsin at Madison, one of the nation’s most storied land-grant institutions, leapt over Chicago, Harvard, MIT, Columbia and two-time defending No. 1 (and fellow Big Ten academic powerhouse) Michigan, as the Top University according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet analysis released by the Global Language Monitor.

There have now had three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin. As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten. Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, each moving up ten or more spots.

“The ‘flight to quality’ continues unabated. The savvy consumer of the education marketplace appears centered on the price-sensitive ‘public ivies’ and technology-centered schools, as well as on-line alternatives. The solidly performing ‘little Ivies’ are now now fairly well distributed across the country– and are holding their own,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.” One aftermath of the recent recession is that consumers understand that it is smart not to accept ‘retail pricing’ and that colleges are no different in this regard from any other institution.”

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of December with a mid-year snapshot, and the last day of 2009 as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 75,000 print and electronic media. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

The Top Twenty Universities by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Univ. of Wisconsin—Madison
  2. University of Chicago
  3. Harvard University
  4. Mass. Institute of Technology
  5. Columbia University
  6. Univ. of Michigan—Ann Arbor
  7. Cornell University
  8. University of California–Berkeley
  9. Yale University
  10. University of Texas—Austin
  11. Stanford University
  12. Princeton University
  13. University of California — Davis
  14. Georgetown University
  15. Duke University
  16. University of California—Los Angeles
  17. University of Washington
  18. New York University
  19. California Institute of Technology
  20. Johns Hopkins University

The Top Ten Universities now include four Ivy League schools, four Public Ivy’s (two from the Big Ten), one technological institute and the always formidable University of Chicago.

We have now three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three Years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin.

As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten.

Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, all moving up ten or more spots.

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Davidson College of North Carolina. This is the fourth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began which now have been represented by the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

Davidson, as well as L.A.’s Occidental College (where President Obama spent his first year in college) both leapt over the Little Three (Amherst, Williams and Wesleyan University) as well as all three previous No. 1’s: Carleton College, Wellesley College, and Colorado College.

The Top Twenty Colleges by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Davidson College
  2. Occidental College
  3. Williams College
  4. Wesleyan University
  5. Carleton College
  6. Amherst College
  7. Bucknell University
  8. Oberlin College
  9. United States Air Force Academy
  10. Pomona College
  11. Wellesley College
  12. Juilliard School of Music
  13. Vassar College
  14. Pratt Institute
  15. United States Military Academy
  16. Smith College
  17. Bowdoin College
  18. College of the Holy Cross
  19. Claremont McKenna College
  20. Bryn Mawr College

The Top Ten among colleges included Bucknell, Oberlin, Pomona and the US Air Force Academy. The Top Twenty included the Little Three, four of the former Seven Sisters (though Vassar is now co-ed), two Patriot League schools, two US Service Academies, the top Catholic College in the US (College of the Holy Cross), two of the Claremont Colleges, and two schools that are not included in the traditional college rankings: the Juilliard School and Pratt Institute, both in New York City.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are the only to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Design, Music, as well as Internet-based (and for-profit) All these were included in the College category with the exception of the online university, which was assigned to the University category.

In addition, the BOC notation signifies Best of Class; it is noted for those schools that are either first in the overall ranking, or first in a specific classification.

Top in the US/Best of Class (BOC) designation was awarded for:

  • Top University: University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Top College: Davidson College
  • Top Engineering Hybrid School: The Cooper Union
  • Top Business: Babson College
  • Top Art and Design School: Pratt Institute
  • Top Art School: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)
  • Top Music School: The Juilliard School
  • Top Online University: University of Phoenix
  • Top Christian School: Wheaton College, Illinois
  • Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross
  • Top Catholic University: Georgetown University
  • Top Service Academy: United States Air Force Academy
  • Top Outré College (New Category): Oberlin

The rankings also include the Biggest Movers for both colleges and universities and the Top States for Top Colleges.

The Universities that gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

  1. Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  2. Miami University—Oxford
  3. Lehigh University
  4. Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo
  5. University of California—Irvine
  6. CUNY-Queens
  7. Georgetown University
  8. Mills College
  9. University of Denver
  10. Rice University

The Colleges that have gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

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  1. Smith College
  2. Trinity College CT
  3. St. John’s College MD
  4. School of Visual Arts (NY)
  5. Fashion Institute of Technology
  6. St Lawrence University
  7. Swarthmore College
  8. Hampshire College
  9. Gettysburg College
  10. Oberlin College

In addition, each of the forty-two states with top colleges is listed with the combined rankings of colleges and universities within the state.

The top five states for top colleges, along with the number of top colleges within the states include:

  1. New York (45)
  2. California (30)
  3. Massachusetts (25)
  4. Pennsylvania (22)
  5. Illinois (12)

The 2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet Rankings contains all of the above information on the Top 300 US Colleges and Universities, with added detail.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

The 53 page guide includes the following:

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

GLM’s College Reputation Management Services are part of our TrendTopper Branding Services.

To learn more, click here.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

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For more information, call 1.512.801.6823 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu.

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

Why you need the TrendTopper MediaBuzz rankings

Simply put:

  • The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.
  • We are Up-to-date, as in, we are an on-going, longitudinal study. Our rankings are fresh, current and updated continually throughout the year. You will never need to wait until the first week in September to see how your schools are ranking.
  • We Provide Brand Analysis. Schools are either hot, or they’re not. We tell you how your schools rank, as brands. Every school on our list has made the cut! Every school is considered a good school, if not a great school.
  • We Measure Brand Equity; the perceived value of your school. Penn is a great (Ivy League) school, but Penn State (before the scandal) was nearly equivalent (No. 22 vs No. 24) in brand equity. After reading our report you can then ask yourself, is it worth the difference in price?
  • The World vs. The Deans. Other rankings are inherently biased. You need to stop and think – does my future employer really care about how other deans rank my school? Get real. The only question he or she actually cares about is can you do the work?
  • We continually update the Top 300 Colleges and Universities Guide throughout the year, so the information that you receive is always fresh and up-to-date.

We are Inclusive, listing Internet and Specialty Schools. It’s important to understand the rankings for Julliard and Cooper Union, as well as schools like the University of Phoenix, historical Black Colleges, and the notoriously underrepresented City University of New York. We even rank schools that opt-out of traditional rankings, such as Bard.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

How TrendTopper enhances college reputation by differentiating ‘brand’ among peers

The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year. The next Internet Rankings will be announced in April, 2009

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email pauljjpayack@gmail.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

 

Spring 2010 Edition

 

Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

.

.

Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

NY Named Top State for Top Colleges for 2010

Calif, Mass, Pa, Ill, Ohio, Va, Texas, NC and Minn follow

AUSTIN, Texas. (August 26, 2010) — New York state has been named the Top State for Top Colleges followed by California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Illinois. Ohio, Virginia, Texas, North Carolina and Minnesota rounded out the Top Ten. The list was assembled by the Global Language Monitor in its twice yearly TrendTopper Media Buzz analysis of the nation’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities.

“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. We survey social media such as Twitter, as well as the Internet, blogosphere, and the global print and electronic media.” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “As such, we remove the biases inherently built into each of the other published rankings. For example, US News recently announced that it has changed a key component to their rankings thereby lowering the value of year-by-year comparisons.”

The Top Ten States with the Most Top Colleges are listed below. Listings include Ranking, the number of top schools in parentheses, the Top University and College, National Best of Class Institutions and Top Surprises for each state.

Asterisks (*) indicate National Best-in-Class

State Rank
No. 1 New York (44)
Top College Vassar College
Top University Columbia University
Top Academy United States Military Academy *
Top Music School Juilliard School *
Top Design School Pratt Institute *
Top Surprise NY as the No. 1 State

No. 2
California (29)
Top College Pomona College
Top University University of California—Los Angeles
Top Surprise Stanford & UC San Diego top Berkeley

No. 3
Massachusetts (25)
Top University Harvard University
Top College Williams College
Top Business College Babson College *
Top Engineering School Massachusetts Institute of Technology *
Top Catholic School College of the Holy Cross *
Top Surprise Amherst falls out of Top 10

No. 4
Pennsylvania (22)
Top University Pennsylvania State University
Top College Bucknell University
Top Surprise Penn State over U of Pennsylvania

No. 5
Illinois (13)
Top University University of Chicago
Top College Wheaton College
Top Christian College Wheaton College *
Top Surprise Northwestern University at No. 39

No. 6
Ohio (11)
Top University Ohio State University—Columbus
Top College Kenyon College
Top Surprise Oberlin College Slips

No. 7
Virginia (10)
Top College University of Richmond
Top University Virginia Tech
Top Surprise VT over UVA

No. 8
Texas (10)
Top University University of Texas—Austin
Top College Austin College
Top Surprise UT breaks into the Top Ten

No. 9
North Carolina (8)
Top University Duke University
Top College Davidson College
Top Surprise UNC falls out of Top Ten

No. 10
Minnesota (8)
Top College Carleton College *
Top University University of Minnesota
Top Surprise Capella now No. 2 Internet School

.

The complete listings of all the states can be found here.

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

 

College Rankings Top 150 – Summer/Spring 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Colleges

Rank

1 Carleton College

2 Williams College

3 Pomona College

4 Middlebury College

5 University of Richmond

6 Wellesley College

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

14 Colorado College

15 College of the Holy Cross

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

18 Bucknell University

19 Reed College

20 Drew University

21 Harvey Mudd College

22 Davidson College

23 Occidental College

24 Skidmore College

25 Claremont McKenna College

26 United States Naval Academy

27 DePauw University

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

30 Barnard College

31 United States Air Force Academy

32 Furman University

33 Morehouse College

34 Macalester College

35 SUNY—Purchase

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

38 Colby College

39 Juilliard School

40 Lafayette College

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

43 Haverford College

44 Alfred University

45 Juniata College

46 Calvin College

47 Ithaca College

48 University of Puget Sound

49 Spelman College (GA)

50 Amherst College

51 Rhode Island School of Design

52 Siena College

53 Wesleyan University

54 Emerson College

55 St Olaf College

56 Bates College

57 Dickinson College

58 University of Northern Iowa

59 Knox College

60 Kenyon College

61 Pitzer College

62 Grinnell College

63 Austin College

64 Scripps College

65 Bryn Mawr College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

67 Oberlin College

68 Presbyterian College

69 Bentley College

70 California Institution of the Arts

71 Ursinus College

72 Bowdoin College

73 College of Charleston

74 Kalamazoo College

75 Augustana College

76 Connecticut College

77 Willamette University

78 Agnes Scott College

79 Rollins College

80 Simmons College

81 Fisk University

82 Sweet Briar College

83 Rowan University

84 Centre College

85 Coe College

86 Earlham College

87 Berklee College of Music

88 Wofford College

89 Denison University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

91 Beloit College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

93 Goucher College

94 Hampshire College

95 Swarthmore College

96 Berry College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

99 Rhodes College

100 Wittenberg University

101 Hobart College

102 Lewis and Clark

103 Berea College

104 Hartwick College

105 Manhattanville College

106 Lake Forest College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

108 California College of the Arts

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

110 New College of South FL

111 Sewanee—University of the South

112 Birmingham Southern college

113 Linfield College

114 College of Wooster

115 Allegheny College

116 Wabash College

117 United States Coast Guard Academy

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

119 Corcoran College of Art and Design

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Hood College

124 Elizabethtown College

125 Millsaps College

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

127 St Michael’s College

128 Gustavus Aldolphus

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 New England Conservatory of Music

131 Gettysburg College

132 Hendrix College

133 Smith College

134 Whitman College

135 Olin College

136 Guilford College

137 School of Visual Arts

138 Trinity College

139 Southwestern University

140 St. John’s College

141 College of New Jersey

142 Wheaton College MA

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

145 Susquehanna University

146 Westmont College

147 Lawrence University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

149 Hillsdale College

150 Bennington College

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available for $998. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

University Rankings Top 150 in the U.S.– Spring/Summer 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Universities

Rank

1 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor

2 Harvard University

3 University of Chicago

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

7 University of Texas—Austin

8 Princeton University

9 Yale University

10 Columbia University

11 Washington University in St. Louis

12 Cornell University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

15 University of Wisconsin—Madison

16 Pennsylvania State University

17 University of Washington

18 Duke University

19 University of Pennsylvania

20 Johns Hopkins University

21 New York University

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

24 University of Minnesota

25 University of Rochester

26 Michigan State University

27 University of California — Davis

28 Boston University

29 Purdue University

30 University of Connecticut

31 University of Florida

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

34 University of Kentucky

35 California Institute of Technology

36 Indiana University—Bloomington

37 University of Arizona

38 Rutgers, the State University of NJ

39 Northwestern University

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

41 Arizona State University

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 University of Southern California

44 University of Colorado—Boulder

45 University of Georgia

46 University of Iowa

47 Georgia Institute of Technology

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

49 Boston College

50 Georgetown University

51 University of Notre Dame

52 Tufts University

53 University of Pittsburgh

54 Emory University

55 University of South Carolina—Columbia

56 Vanderbilt University

57 University of Delaware

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

59 Texas A&M University

60 Dartmouth College

61 Syracuse University

62 University of Phoenix

63 Brown University

64 American University

65 Iowa State University

66 University of Missouri—Columbia

67 University of Miami

68 University of New Hampshire

69 George Washington University

70 University of Kansas

71 University of Oregon

72 University of California—Irvine

73 University of Oklahoma

74 University of Maryland—College Park

75 Loyola University Chicago

76 Tulane University

77 Washington State University

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

79 Case Western Reserve University

80 Kansas State University

81 Northeastern University

82 Auburn University

83 University of Alabama

84 Drexel University

85 Baylor University

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

87 Fordham University

88 Wake Forest University

89 DePaul University

90 Villanova University

91 Rice University

92 Brigham Young University—Provo

93 University of Vermont

94 Howard University

95 University of California—Riverside

96 Clemson University

97 Colorado State University

98 Chapman University

99 University of Tennessee

100 Brandeis University

101 University of Arkansas

102 Santa Clara University

103 Marquette University

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Southern Methodist University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 University of Dayton

109 Hofstra University

110 Lehigh University

111 St Louis University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

114 Pepperdine University

115 Gonzaga University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

117 Tuskegee University

118 University of Denver

119 College of William and Mary

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

121 James Madison University

122 Howard University (DC)

123 Kaplan University

124 Stetson University

125 University of the Pacific

126 CUNY-City College

127 Texas Christian University

128 Fairfield University

129 Loyola University New Orleans

130 Binghamton University

131 Catholic University of America

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

133 Elon University

134 Seattle University

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

136 New Jersey Institute of Technology

137 Stevens Institute of Technology

138 Colorado School of Mines

139 Capella University

140 Morgan State University

141 Truman State University

142 Evergreen State

143 Clarkson University

144 Mills College

145 University of Tulsa

146 Clark University

147 Rose-Hulman

148 Quinnipiac University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

150 CUNY-Baruch

152 Miami University—Oxford

153 Michigan Technological University

154 University of Dallas

155 University of Missouri—Rolla

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

157 Dillard University (LA)

158 University of San Francisco

159 Florida A&M University

160 Xavier University of Louisiana

161 Loyola Marymount University

162 CUNY-Hunter College

163 The Citadel

164 CUNY-Queens

165 University of Utah

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

Pomona College Ranked Sixth in Media Awareness

Pomona College is currently ranked sixth out of all colleges on The Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings.

The report, released biannually, ranks colleges and universities in terms of their presence in international print and electronic media. The report is meant to assess schools’ media awareness and global reputations.

Pomona rose from its position of 21 in the spring 2009 college rankings to sixth this previous fall. The top-ranked college was Wellesley College, while the University of Michigan topped the university rankings.

“During 2008-09, Pomona College was mentioned more than 2,800 times in print, broadcast, and on online news sites, a record for the nine years we’ve been tracking,” said Cynthia Peters, Director of Media Relations at Pomona College. (Read More.)

GLM’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities Spring 2010 Edition will be released Week of May 24th.

See November Rankings here.

Read more

First Internet-based College Guide Now Available

For Immediate Release

Top 225 Colleges and Universities Ranked

by TrendTopper MediaBuzz™

Austin, TX December 8, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced the immediate availability of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings. Unlike other college guides, it is published twice a year, with spring and fall editions. This means that readers can make crucial decisions using information from near real time rankings. The data for the current edition is accurate as of November 1, 2009. The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site.

The guide uses exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz™ analyses of the nation’s colleges and universities according their appearance in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet throughout the blogosphere, and including social media such as Twitter. The GLM rankings are also the first to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Music and Engineering schools, as well as online universities.

“TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left or right-leaning professors, and all the rest,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor.“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.”

Institutions are ranked by overall presence, and how quickly they are moving over the short and long-term. In addition, the study reveals the actual scores that separate the Top 225 Colleges and Universities from one another. In addition, the schools are ranked by their position in their state.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

Since TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranks overall media awareness and strength of a school’s ‘brand’ or reputation, the Global Language Monitor included specialty schools, which were included in the College category with the exception of the online universities, which was assigned to the University category.

In the University category, the University of Michigan moved up three places to the top spot, while Harvard saw a decline in Media Buzz citations of some 20%. Other major movers include MIT jumping from No. 16 to No. 2 and North Carolina, another public ivy, movinginto the Top Ten, with California—Berkeley moving from No.10 to No. 6.

In the College category, Wellesley overtook Colorado College, Williams and Amherst to claim the No. 1 position, a first for a women’s college. Pomona College, one of California’s Claremont Colleges re-emerged in the Top Ten, and Eugene Lang College of New School University debuted at a very strong No. 9.

The Top Specialty schools listed in their categories as well as overall rank are listed below.

  • Top Business school was Babson College was the Top Business (67 overall, college).
  • Top Art and Design schools were Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) (27 overall, college), Pratt Institute (28 overall, college), and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (47 overall, college).
  • Top Engineering school was The Cooper Union (38 overall, college).
  • Top Music Schools were the Julliard School (50 overall, college), the New England Conservatory of Music (96 overall, college), and Berklee College (99 overall, college).
  • Top Online/For Profit University was the University of Phoenix, USA (37 overall, university).
  • Top Christian was Wheaton College, IL (16 overall, college),
  • Top Military Academies were the United States Naval Academy (20 overall, college), the United States Military Academy (48 overall, college) and the United States Air Force Academy (61 overall, college).

The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site. The cost is $29.95.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

English has become the first truly global language with some 1.53 billion speakers as a first, second or auxiliary language. Paul JJ Payack examines its impact on the world economy, culture and society in A Million Words and Counting (Citadel Press, New York, 2009).

The current estimate for the number of words in the English Language stands at 1,002,116.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, send email to info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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University Rankings Top 125 – Fall 2009

The Top 125 Universities ranked by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

Return to main College Rankings page.

 

 

Universities
Rank
1 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, MI
2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA
3 Harvard University, MA
4 Columbia University, NY
5 University of Chicago, IL
6 University of California-Berkeley, CA
7 University of Wisconsin-Madison , WI
8 Stanford University, CA
9 University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, NC
10 Cornell University, NY
11 Yale University, CT
12 Princeton University, NJ
13 University of Pennsylvania, PA
14 University of California-Los Angeles, CA
15 University of Washington, WA
16 University of Minnesota, MN
17 New York University, NY
18 University of California-San Diego, CA
19 Johns Hopkins University, MD
20 Ohio State University-Columbus, OH
21 University of Virginia, VA
22 U. of California, Davis, CA
23 Georgia Institute of Technology, GA
24 Duke University, NC
25 Boston University, MA
26 University of Texas-Austin, TX
27 University of Florida, FL
28 University of California-Santa Barbara, CA
29 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, IL
30 Boston College, MA
31 U. of California, Irvine, CA
32 University of Georgia, GA
33 Northwestern University, IL
34 Pennsylvania State University, PA
35 Rutgers University, NJ
36 Purdue University, IN
37 University of Phoenix, AZ
38 University of Southern California, CA
39 University of Pittsburgh, PA
40 SUNY Stony Brook, NY
41 University of Indiana–Bloomington, IN
42 University of Iowa, IA
43 California Institute of Technology, CA
44 Georgetown University, DC
45 Brown University, RI
46 Washington University in St. Louis, MO
47 Syracuse University, NY
48 George Washington University, DC
49 University of Connecticut, CT
50 Texas A&M University, TX
51 Emory University, GA
52 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY
53 Vanderbilt University,TN
54 The Citadel, SC
55 University of Notre Dame, IN
56 Case Western Reserve, OH
57 University of Colorado–Boulder, CO
58 Carnegie Mellon University, PA
59 University of Arizona, AZ
60 University of Nebraska–Lincoln, NB
61 Dartmouth College, NH
62 University of Miami, FL
63 University of Rochester, NY
64 University of Maryland-College Park, MD
65 Tufts University, MA
66 American University, DC
67 Michigan State University
68 Clemson University, SC
69 Brigham Young University, UT
70 Auburn University, AL
71 Rice University, TX
72 Tulane University, LA
73 University of Delaware, DE
74 University of Kansas
75 Fordham University, NY
76 Baylor University, TX
77 Lehigh University , PA
78 SUNY Buffalo, NY
79 Virginia Tech, VA
80 Southern Methodist University, TX
81 University of Oklahoma, OK
82 Miami University, OH
83 New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ
84 Wake Forest University, NC
85 University of Missouri–Columbia, MO
86 Brandeis University, MA
87 Marquette University, WI
88 Santa Clara University, CA
89 North Carolina State University, NC
90 Loyola Marymount, CA
91 Northeastern University, MA
92 Florida State University, FL
93 College of William and Mary, VA
94 University of San Diego. CA
95 Providence College, RI
96 CUNY Queens College, NY
97 College of New Jersey, NJ
98 Iowa State University, IA
99 Villanova University, PA
100 Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
101 CUNY Brooklyn College, NY
101 James Madison, VA
102 SUNY Purchase, NY
103 Creighton University, NE
104 Texas Christian University, TX
105 Yeshiva University, NY
106 Drexel University, PA
107 Pepperdine University, CA
108 Stevens Institute of Technology, NJ
109 SUNY Binghamton, NY
110 SUNY Albany, NY
111 Drake University, IA
112 University of Vermont, VT
113 CUNY Baruch College, NY
114 SUNY Albany, NY
115 University of Redlands, CA
116 University of Tulsa, OK
117 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA
118 Butler University, IN
119 Gonzaga University, WA
120 Valpariso University, IN
121 Bradley University, IL
122 Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CA
123 CUNY City College, NY
124 Xavier University, LA

Misc. VII

Top Colleges Winter 2011

2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet “Brand Equity” Rankings

Wisconsin Tops Chicago and Harvard in Universities; Davidson over Occidental and Williams in Colleges

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Historic Re-alignment of what is considered an ‘elite’ school

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AUSTIN, Texas December 30, 2010 — The University of Wisconsin at Madison, one of the nation’s most storied land-grant institutions, leapt over Chicago, Harvard, MIT, Columbia and two-time defending No. 1 (and fellow Big Ten academic powerhouse) Michigan, as the Top University according to the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet analysis released by the Global Language Monitor.

There have now had three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin. As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten. Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, each moving up ten or more spots.

“The ‘flight to quality’ continues unabated. The savvy consumer of the education marketplace appears centered on the price-sensitive ‘public ivies’ and technology-centered schools, as well as on-line alternatives. The solidly performing ‘little Ivies’ are now now fairly well distributed across the country– and are holding their own,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.” One aftermath of the recent recession is that consumers understand that it is smart not to accept ‘retail pricing’ and that colleges are no different in this regard from any other institution.”

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Analysis uses the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s classifications as the basis to distinguish between Universities and Liberal Arts Colleges. The schools were ranked in the last week of December with a mid-year snapshot, and the last day of 2009 as the base.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz utilizes a mathematical model that ‘normalizes’ the data collected from the Internet, social media, and blogosphere as well as the top 75,000 print and electronic media. The end result is a non-biased analytical tool that provides a gauge of relative values among various institutions, as well as measures of how that value changes over time.

The Top Twenty Universities by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Univ. of Wisconsin—Madison
  2. University of Chicago
  3. Harvard University
  4. Mass. Institute of Technology
  5. Columbia University
  6. Univ. of Michigan—Ann Arbor
  7. Cornell University
  8. University of California–Berkeley
  9. Yale University
  10. University of Texas—Austin
  11. Stanford University
  12. Princeton University
  13. University of California — Davis
  14. Georgetown University
  15. Duke University
  16. University of California—Los Angeles
  17. University of Washington
  18. New York University
  19. California Institute of Technology
  20. Johns Hopkins University

The Top Ten Universities now include four Ivy League schools, four Public Ivy’s (two from the Big Ten), one technological institute and the always formidable University of Chicago.

We have now three different schools taking the top spot for Universities in the last three Years: Harvard, Michigan and now Wisconsin.

As for Harvard, it slipped to No. 3, while the University of Chicago moved into the No. 2 spot. Cornell University and the University of California at Berkeley broke into the Top Ten, knocking out Stanford and Princeton. UCLA also fell out of the Top Ten.

Other big movers included Georgetown, California-Davis and CalTech, all moving up ten or more spots.

The College category also produced a new No. 1, Davidson College of North Carolina. This is the fourth different college to take the top spot since these rankings began which now have been represented by the West (Colorado College), the East (Wellesley College) and the Midwest (Carleton College). Wellesley was also the only Women’s College to top a general college ranking.

Davidson, as well as L.A.’s Occidental College (where President Obama spent his first year in college) both leapt over the Little Three (Amherst, Williams and Wesleyan University) as well as all three previous No. 1’s: Carleton College, Wellesley College, and Colorado College.

The Top Twenty Colleges by the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet rankings follow.

  1. Davidson College
  2. Occidental College
  3. Williams College
  4. Wesleyan University
  5. Carleton College
  6. Amherst College
  7. Bucknell University
  8. Oberlin College
  9. United States Air Force Academy
  10. Pomona College
  11. Wellesley College
  12. Juilliard School of Music
  13. Vassar College
  14. Pratt Institute
  15. United States Military Academy
  16. Smith College
  17. Bowdoin College
  18. College of the Holy Cross
  19. Claremont McKenna College
  20. Bryn Mawr College

The Top Ten among colleges included Bucknell, Oberlin, Pomona and the US Air Force Academy. The Top Twenty included the Little Three, four of the former Seven Sisters (though Vassar is now co-ed), two Patriot League schools, two US Service Academies, the top Catholic College in the US (College of the Holy Cross), two of the Claremont Colleges, and two schools that are not included in the traditional college rankings: the Juilliard School and Pratt Institute, both in New York City.

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are the only to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Design, Music, as well as Internet-based (and for-profit) All these were included in the College category with the exception of the online university, which was assigned to the University category.

In addition, the BOC notation signifies Best of Class; it is noted for those schools that are either first in the overall ranking, or first in a specific classification.

Top in the US/Best of Class (BOC) designation was awarded for:

  • Top University: University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Top College: Davidson College
  • Top Engineering Hybrid School: The Cooper Union
  • Top Business: Babson College
  • Top Art and Design School: Pratt Institute
  • Top Art School: School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)
  • Top Music School: The Juilliard School
  • Top Online University: University of Phoenix
  • Top Christian School: Wheaton College, Illinois
  • Top Catholic College: College of the Holy Cross
  • Top Catholic University: Georgetown University
  • Top Service Academy: United States Air Force Academy
  • Top Outré College (New Category): Oberlin

The rankings also include the Biggest Movers for both colleges and universities and the Top States for Top Colleges.

The Universities that gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

  1. Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  2. Miami University—Oxford
  3. Lehigh University
  4. Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo
  5. University of California—Irvine
  6. CUNY-Queens
  7. Georgetown University
  8. Mills College
  9. University of Denver
  10. Rice University

The Colleges that have gained the most ‘media momentum’ since our last analysis were:

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  1. Smith College
  2. Trinity College CT
  3. St. John’s College MD
  4. School of Visual Arts (NY)
  5. Fashion Institute of Technology
  6. St Lawrence University
  7. Swarthmore College
  8. Hampshire College
  9. Gettysburg College
  10. Oberlin College

In addition, each of the forty-two states with top colleges is listed with the combined rankings of colleges and universities within the state.

The top five states for top colleges, along with the number of top colleges within the states include:

  1. New York (45)
  2. California (30)
  3. Massachusetts (25)
  4. Pennsylvania (22)
  5. Illinois (12)

The 2011 TrendTopper MediaBuzz Internet Rankings contains all of the above information on the Top 300 US Colleges and Universities, with added detail.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

The 53 page guide includes the following:

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

GLM’s College Reputation Management Services are part of our TrendTopper Branding Services.

To learn more, click here.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

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For more information, call 1.512.801.6823

  1. Why another college guide; why TrendTopper MediaBuzz?
  2. Introduction – A New Reality
  3. Highlights for Winter/Spring 2011
  4. About TrendTopper MediaBuzz™
  5. Top Universities for Winter/Spring 2011
  6. Top Colleges for Winter/Spring 2011
  7. Universities with Greatest Change
  8. Biggest Movers – Universities
  9. Biggest Movers – Colleges
  10. Top States for Top Schools
  11. TrendTopper MediaBuzz Backgrounder

Why you need the TrendTopper MediaBuzz rankings

Simply put:

  • The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.
  • We are Up-to-date, as in, we are an on-going, longitudinal study. Our rankings are fresh, current and updated continually throughout the year. You will never need to wait until the first week in September to see how your schools are ranking.
  • We Provide Brand Analysis. Schools are either hot, or they’re not. We tell you how your schools rank, as brands. Every school on our list has made the cut! Every school is considered a good school, if not a great school.
  • We Measure Brand Equity; the perceived value of your school. Penn is a great (Ivy League) school, but Penn State (before the scandal) was nearly equivalent (No. 22 vs No. 24) in brand equity. After reading our report you can then ask yourself, is it worth the difference in price?
  • The World vs. The Deans. Other rankings are inherently biased. You need to stop and think – does my future employer really care about how other deans rank my school? Get real. The only question he or she actually cares about is can you do the work?
  • We continually update the Top 300 Colleges and Universities Guide throughout the year, so the information that you receive is always fresh and up-to-date.

We are Inclusive, listing Internet and Specialty Schools. It’s important to understand the rankings for Julliard and Cooper Union, as well as schools like the University of Phoenix, historical Black Colleges, and the notoriously underrepresented City University of New York. We even rank schools that opt-out of traditional rankings, such as Bard.

About The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings

GLM created the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings to remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

We found it highly interest that many institutions used our rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions:

Harvard University: “Rankings highlight correlation between university prestige and media coverage … Indeed, the study seems to validate the Harvard Kennedy School’s recent decision to rebrand itself. Known as the Kennedy School of Government until last spring, the public policy and administration changed its shorthand so that it includes the word “Harvard”.

Boston College: “University Spokesman Jack Dunn said, “Boston College’s ranking in this study serves as an affirmation of what we have long believed. Academic research and accomplishments along with media citations and this recent ranking are all affirmations of the growing steam of this university.” The major factors that contributed to BC’s high ranking were a well-published academic community, a strong public relations office, and a successful sports program in recent years.

Vanderbilt University: “… when prospective students, faculty, friends and neighbors hear ‘Vanderbilt’ they associate it with excellent academic programs, innovative research, world class health care, the best students, a gorgeous campus, a dynamic hometown, rockin’ athletics and more. And, by one measure at least, we’re succeeding.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: “[GLM’s TrendTopper analysis] is at least one measure of wealth, success and prestige,” Hoover said. “Even on campuses where presidents do not put too much stock into rankings themselves, it is something they must think about” because alums and top students pay attention to them. – Eric Hoover, marketing strategies, Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted in Harvard Crimson.

How TrendTopper enhances college reputation by differentiating ‘brand’ among peers

The Global Language Monitor today announced TrendTopper MediaBuzz Reputation Management (TMRM) solution for higher education. Using TrendTopper, colleges and universities can enhance their standings among peers by assessing their strengths and weaknesses in any number of areas. TrendTopper measures what is important to colleges’ and their various constituencies on the Internet, in social media, the blogosphere, as well as the global print and electronic media. TrendTopper can help colleges and universities distinguish themselves among peers – as well as helping ensure that key messages are getting though the clutter.

“At a time when a few students more or less can change an institution’s revenue stream from positive to negative, or mean an even bigger bite out of the endowment, brand equity moves from an interesting concept to an imperative,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of TrendTopper Technologies. “Movement within a Peer Group, expanding an institution’s Peer Group, or, even, moving from one Peer Group to another can spell ultimate success, or failure, for that particular institution.”

Colleges and universities have one more element that is critical to their ultimate success — the fact that they are linked to other colleges by reputation (Peer Groups or Cohorts), which extend in many ways beyond and across conferences and leagues. These include geographic proximity, religious affiliation, similar test scores, political outlook, or long-time sports rivalries,

Institutions can use TrendTopper methodologies to determine strengths and weaknesses vs. their peer group or any other criteria they find relevant, answering questions, such as:

  • We have little knowledge of how we are perceived in Social Media. What we don’t know can’t be shaped. Can you help us there?
  • How is our institution perceived by the public at large? We have a strong reputation among high school guidance counselors and peer assessments, but parents (and students) want to know about potential employers?
  • We are known for our excellent liberal arts programs, but we feel our information technology offering lags in recognition. Our competitors annually enroll about 20% more students for what we see an equal (or even lesser) curriculum. What can we do?
  • We know that we receive a large share of voice with our monthly survey from the econ department, what can we do to replicate this success?
  • We don’t have a football [or lacrosse or dance or bioengineering] program. Everyone else in our peer group has one. Does it make a difference?
  • Most students now go first to Wikipedia to find an answer. This applies Colleges and Universities, as well. We don’t agree with our Wikipedia assessment. What do we do here?

College and University Rankings

Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper College and University Internet Rankings is published twice a year. The next Internet Rankings will be announced in April, 2009

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.

TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left-leaning professors, and all the rest.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email pauljjpayack@gmail.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

 

Spring 2010 Edition

 

Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

 

Top 10 States for Top Colleges Spring 2010

For Current Edition Summer/Spring 2012 (April 2012), Click here

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Key: State Rank, School Rank (c0llege or university), Name of School

Rankings:

No. 1 New York (44)

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Columbia University

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

12 Cornell University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

21 New York University

24 Skidmore College

25 University of Rochester

30 Barnard College

35 SUNY—Purchase

39 Juilliard School

44 Alfred University

47 Ithaca College

52 Siena College

61 Syracuse University

87 Fordham University

101 Hobart College

104 Hartwick College

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Manhattanville College

109 Hofstra University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Kaplan University

126 CUNY-City College

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 Binghamton University

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

137 School of Visual Arts

143 Clarkson University

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

150 CUNY-Baruch

162 CUNY-Hunter College

164 CUNY-Queens

No. 2 California (29)

3 Pomona College

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

21 Harvey Mudd College

23 Occidental College

25 Claremont McKenna College

27 University of California — Davis

35 California Institute of Technology

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

43 University of Southern California

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

61 Pitzer College

64 Scripps College

70 California Institution of the Arts

72 University of California—Irvine

95 University of California—Riverside

98 Chapman University

102 Santa Clara University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 California College of the arts

114 Pepperdine University

125 University of the Pacific

144 Mills College

146 Westmont College

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

158 University of San Francisco

161 Loyola Marymount University

No. 3 Massachusetts (25)

2 Harvard University

2 Williams College

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

6 Wellesley College

15 College of the Holy Cross

28 Boston University

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

49 Boston College

50 Amherst College

52 Tufts University

54 Emerson College

69 Bentley College

80 Simmons College

81 Northeastern University

86 Berklee College of Music

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

94 Hampshire College

100 Brandeis University

130 New England Conservatory of Music

133 Smith College

135 Olin College

142 Wheaton College MA

146 Clark University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

No. 4 Pennsylvania (22)

16 Pennsylvania State University

18 Bucknell University

19 University of Pennsylvania

40 Lafayette College

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 Haverford College

45 Juniata College

53 University of Pittsburgh

57 Dickinson College

65 Bryn Mawr College

71 Ursinus College

84 Drexel University

90 Villanova University

95 Swarthmore College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

110 Lehigh University

115 Allegheny College

124 Elizabethtown College

131 Gettysburg College

145 Susquehanna University

No. 5 Illinois (13)

3 University of Chicago

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

39 Northwestern University

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

59 Knox College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

75 Augustana College

75 Loyola University Chicago

89 Depaul University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

105 Lake Forest College

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

No. 6 Ohio (11)

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

60 Kenyon College

67 Oberlin College

79 Case Western Reserve University

89 Denison University

100 Wittenberg University

108 University of Dayton

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

114 College of Wooster

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

152 Miami University—Oxford

No. 7 Virginia (10)

5 University of Richmond

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

82 Sweet Briar College

119 College of William and Mary

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

121 James Madison University

No. 8 Texas (10)

7 University of Texas—Austin

59 Texas A&M University

63 Austin College

85 Baylor University

91 Rice University

105 Southern Methodist University

127 Texas Christian University

140 Southwestern University

154 University of Dallas

165 Trinity University

No. 9 North Carolina (8)

18 Duke University

22 Davidson College

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

68 Presbyterian College

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

88 Wake Forest University

133 Elon University

136 Guilford College

No. 10 Minnesota (8)

1 Carleton College

24 University of Minnesota

34 Macalester College

55 St Olaf College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

129 Gustavus Aldolphus

139 Capella University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

 

NY Named Top State for Top Colleges for 2010

Calif, Mass, Pa, Ill, Ohio, Va, Texas, NC and Minn follow

AUSTIN, Texas. (August 26, 2010) — New York state has been named the Top State for Top Colleges followed by California, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and Illinois. Ohio, Virginia, Texas, North Carolina and Minnesota rounded out the Top Ten. The list was assembled by the Global Language Monitor in its twice yearly TrendTopper Media Buzz analysis of the nation’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities.

“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions. We survey social media such as Twitter, as well as the Internet, blogosphere, and the global print and electronic media.” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “As such, we remove the biases inherently built into each of the other published rankings. For example, US News recently announced that it has changed a key component to their rankings thereby lowering the value of year-by-year comparisons.”

The Top Ten States with the Most Top Colleges are listed below. Listings include Ranking, the number of top schools in parentheses, the Top University and College, National Best of Class Institutions and Top Surprises for each state.

Asterisks (*) indicate National Best-in-Class

State Rank
No. 1 New York (44)
Top College Vassar College
Top University Columbia University
Top Academy United States Military Academy *
Top Music School Juilliard School *
Top Design School Pratt Institute *
Top Surprise NY as the No. 1 State

No. 2
California (29)
Top College Pomona College
Top University University of California—Los Angeles
Top Surprise Stanford & UC San Diego top Berkeley

No. 3
Massachusetts (25)
Top University Harvard University
Top College Williams College
Top Business College Babson College *
Top Engineering School Massachusetts Institute of Technology *
Top Catholic School College of the Holy Cross *
Top Surprise Amherst falls out of Top 10

No. 4
Pennsylvania (22)
Top University Pennsylvania State University
Top College Bucknell University
Top Surprise Penn State over U of Pennsylvania

No. 5
Illinois (13)
Top University University of Chicago
Top College Wheaton College
Top Christian College Wheaton College *
Top Surprise Northwestern University at No. 39

No. 6
Ohio (11)
Top University Ohio State University—Columbus
Top College Kenyon College
Top Surprise Oberlin College Slips

No. 7
Virginia (10)
Top College University of Richmond
Top University Virginia Tech
Top Surprise VT over UVA

No. 8
Texas (10)
Top University University of Texas—Austin
Top College Austin College
Top Surprise UT breaks into the Top Ten

No. 9
North Carolina (8)
Top University Duke University
Top College Davidson College
Top Surprise UNC falls out of Top Ten

No. 10
Minnesota (8)
Top College Carleton College *
Top University University of Minnesota
Top Surprise Capella now No. 2 Internet School

.

The complete listings of all the states can be found here.

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

 

College Rankings Top 150 – Summer/Spring 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Colleges

Rank

1 Carleton College

2 Williams College

3 Pomona College

4 Middlebury College

5 University of Richmond

6 Wellesley College

7 Vassar College

8 Union College

9 Cooper Union

10 Hamilton College

11 United States Military Academy

12 Colgate University

13 Sarah Lawrence University

14 Colorado College

15 College of the Holy Cross

16 Pratt Institute

17 Bard College

18 Bucknell University

19 Reed College

20 Drew University

21 Harvey Mudd College

22 Davidson College

23 Occidental College

24 Skidmore College

25 Claremont McKenna College

26 United States Naval Academy

27 DePauw University

28 Wheaton College IL

29 Augustana College

30 Barnard College

31 United States Air Force Academy

32 Furman University

33 Morehouse College

34 Macalester College

35 SUNY—Purchase

36 Mount Holyoke College

37 Babson College

38 Colby College

39 Juilliard School

40 Lafayette College

41 Virginia Military Institute

42 Washington and Lee University

43 Haverford College

44 Alfred University

45 Juniata College

46 Calvin College

47 Ithaca College

48 University of Puget Sound

49 Spelman College (GA)

50 Amherst College

51 Rhode Island School of Design

52 Siena College

53 Wesleyan University

54 Emerson College

55 St Olaf College

56 Bates College

57 Dickinson College

58 University of Northern Iowa

59 Knox College

60 Kenyon College

61 Pitzer College

62 Grinnell College

63 Austin College

64 Scripps College

65 Bryn Mawr College

66 School of the Art Institute of Chicago

67 Oberlin College

68 Presbyterian College

69 Bentley College

70 California Institution of the Arts

71 Ursinus College

72 Bowdoin College

73 College of Charleston

74 Kalamazoo College

75 Augustana College

76 Connecticut College

77 Willamette University

78 Agnes Scott College

79 Rollins College

80 Simmons College

81 Fisk University

82 Sweet Briar College

83 Rowan University

84 Centre College

85 Coe College

86 Earlham College

87 Berklee College of Music

88 Wofford College

89 Denison University

90 Illinois Wesleyan University

91 Beloit College

92 Minneapolis College of Art and Design

93 Goucher College

94 Hampshire College

95 Swarthmore College

96 Berry College

97 Muhlenberg College

98 Franklin and Marshall College

99 Rhodes College

100 Wittenberg University

101 Hobart College

102 Lewis and Clark

103 Berea College

104 Hartwick College

105 Manhattanville College

106 Lake Forest College

107 Curtis Institute of Music

108 California College of the Arts

109 Cleveland Institute of Music

110 New College of South FL

111 Sewanee—University of the South

112 Birmingham Southern college

113 Linfield College

114 College of Wooster

115 Allegheny College

116 Wabash College

117 United States Coast Guard Academy

118 United States Merchant Marine Academy

119 Corcoran College of Art and Design

120 University of Mary Washington

121 Hampden – Sydney College

122 Fashion Institute of Technology

123 Hood College

124 Elizabethtown College

125 Millsaps College

126 Baldwin – Wallace College

127 St Michael’s College

128 Gustavus Aldolphus

129 SUNY—Geneseo

130 New England Conservatory of Music

131 Gettysburg College

132 Hendrix College

133 Smith College

134 Whitman College

135 Olin College

136 Guilford College

137 School of Visual Arts

138 Trinity College

139 Southwestern University

140 St. John’s College

141 College of New Jersey

142 Wheaton College MA

143 St Lawrence University

144 Eugene Lang College of New School U.

145 Susquehanna University

146 Westmont College

147 Lawrence University

148 University of Minnesota Morris

149 Hillsdale College

150 Bennington College

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available for $998. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

University Rankings Top 150 in the U.S.– Spring/Summer 2010

The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. It is a democratic, self-generating ratings system, since it captures the brand equity associated with each of these fine institutions,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor. “GLM’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings actually removes all bias inherent in each of the other published rankings, since they actually reflect what is being said and stated on the billions of web pages that we measure.

Summer/Spring 2010

Top 150 Universities

Rank

1 University of Michigan—Ann Arbor

2 Harvard University

3 University of Chicago

4 University of California—Los Angeles

5 Stanford University

6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology

7 University of Texas—Austin

8 Princeton University

9 Yale University

10 Columbia University

11 Washington University in St. Louis

12 Cornell University

13 University of California—San Diego

14 University of California–Berkeley

15 University of Wisconsin—Madison

16 Pennsylvania State University

17 University of Washington

18 Duke University

19 University of Pennsylvania

20 Johns Hopkins University

21 New York University

22 Virginia Tech

23 University of Virginia

24 University of Minnesota

25 University of Rochester

26 Michigan State University

27 University of California — Davis

28 Boston University

29 Purdue University

30 University of Connecticut

31 University of Florida

32 University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill

33 Ohio State University—Columbus

34 University of Kentucky

35 California Institute of Technology

36 Indiana University—Bloomington

37 University of Arizona

38 Rutgers, the State University of NJ

39 Northwestern University

40 University of California—Santa Cruz

41 Arizona State University

42 Carnegie Mellon University

43 University of Southern California

44 University of Colorado—Boulder

45 University of Georgia

46 University of Iowa

47 Georgia Institute of Technology

48 University of Illinois—Urbana – Champaign

49 Boston College

50 Georgetown University

51 University of Notre Dame

52 Tufts University

53 University of Pittsburgh

54 Emory University

55 University of South Carolina—Columbia

56 Vanderbilt University

57 University of Delaware

58 University of California—Santa Barbara

59 Texas A&M University

60 Dartmouth College

61 Syracuse University

62 University of Phoenix

63 Brown University

64 American University

65 Iowa State University

66 University of Missouri—Columbia

67 University of Miami

68 University of New Hampshire

69 George Washington University

70 University of Kansas

71 University of Oregon

72 University of California—Irvine

73 University of Oklahoma

74 University of Maryland—College Park

75 Loyola University Chicago

76 Tulane University

77 Washington State University

78 North Carolina State University—Raleigh

79 Case Western Reserve University

80 Kansas State University

81 Northeastern University

82 Auburn University

83 University of Alabama

84 Drexel University

85 Baylor University

86 University of Massachusetts—Amherst

87 Fordham University

88 Wake Forest University

89 DePaul University

90 Villanova University

91 Rice University

92 Brigham Young University—Provo

93 University of Vermont

94 Howard University

95 University of California—Riverside

96 Clemson University

97 Colorado State University

98 Chapman University

99 University of Tennessee

100 Brandeis University

101 University of Arkansas

102 Santa Clara University

103 Marquette University

104 Rochester Inst. of Technology

105 Southern Methodist University

106 University of Redlands

107 University of San Diego

108 University of Dayton

109 Hofstra University

110 Lehigh University

111 St Louis University

112 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

113 Yeshiva University

114 Pepperdine University

115 Gonzaga University

116 SUNY—Stony Brook

117 Tuskegee University

118 University of Denver

119 College of William and Mary

120 Illinois Institute of Technology

121 James Madison University

122 Howard University (DC)

123 Kaplan University

124 Stetson University

125 University of the Pacific

126 CUNY-City College

127 Texas Christian University

128 Fairfield University

129 Loyola University New Orleans

130 Binghamton University

131 Catholic University of America

132 University at Buffalo—SUNY

133 Elon University

134 Seattle University

135 CUNY-Brooklyn

136 New Jersey Institute of Technology

137 Stevens Institute of Technology

138 Colorado School of Mines

139 Capella University

140 Morgan State University

141 Truman State University

142 Evergreen State

143 Clarkson University

144 Mills College

145 University of Tulsa

146 Clark University

147 Rose-Hulman

148 Quinnipiac University

149 Worcester Polytechnic Institute

150 CUNY-Baruch

152 Miami University—Oxford

153 Michigan Technological University

154 University of Dallas

155 University of Missouri—Rolla

156 Cal Poly—San Luis Obispo

157 Dillard University (LA)

158 University of San Francisco

159 Florida A&M University

160 Xavier University of Louisiana

161 Loyola Marymount University

162 CUNY-Hunter College

163 The Citadel

164 CUNY-Queens

165 University of Utah

The Global Language Monitor publishes the TrendTopper Media Buzz College and University Rankings. twice a year, with spring and fall editions. Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

The complete report, including short term and long term change, rankings by state, and complete PQI index is available. For more information, call 1.925.367.7557 or email pjjp@post.harvard.edu

 

Pomona College Ranked Sixth in Media Awareness

Pomona College is currently ranked sixth out of all colleges on The Global Language Monitor’s TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings.

The report, released biannually, ranks colleges and universities in terms of their presence in international print and electronic media. The report is meant to assess schools’ media awareness and global reputations.

Pomona rose from its position of 21 in the spring 2009 college rankings to sixth this previous fall. The top-ranked college was Wellesley College, while the University of Michigan topped the university rankings.

“During 2008-09, Pomona College was mentioned more than 2,800 times in print, broadcast, and on online news sites, a record for the nine years we’ve been tracking,” said Cynthia Peters, Director of Media Relations at Pomona College. (Read More.)

GLM’s Top 300 Colleges and Universities Spring 2010 Edition will be released Week of May 24th.

See November Rankings here.

Read more

First Internet-based College Guide Now Available

For Immediate Release

Top 225 Colleges and Universities Ranked

by TrendTopper MediaBuzz™

Austin, TX December 8, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor today announced the immediate availability of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College and University Rankings. Unlike other college guides, it is published twice a year, with spring and fall editions. This means that readers can make crucial decisions using information from near real time rankings. The data for the current edition is accurate as of November 1, 2009. The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site.

The guide uses exclusive TrendTopper MediaBuzz™ analyses of the nation’s colleges and universities according their appearance in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet throughout the blogosphere, and including social media such as Twitter. The GLM rankings are also the first to include specialty schools, such as Art, Business, Music and Engineering schools, as well as online universities.

“TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings remove all bias that we saw as inherent in each of the other published rankings, be they peer assessments, the opinion of high school guidance counselors, the ratio of endowment to number of students, number of left or right-leaning professors, and all the rest,” said Paul JJ Payack, the president of Global Language Monitor.“The TrendTopper MediaBuzz Rankings are a way of seeing the schools through the eyes of the world at large. As with any brand, prospective students, alumni, employers, and the world at large believe that students who are graduated from such institutions will carry on the all the hallmarks of that particular school.”

Institutions are ranked by overall presence, and how quickly they are moving over the short and long-term. In addition, the study reveals the actual scores that separate the Top 225 Colleges and Universities from one another. In addition, the schools are ranked by their position in their state.

Many institutions of higher education, including Harvard, Boston College, and Vanderbilt have used the rankings as a validation of their recent reputation management decisions.

Since TrendTopper MediaBuzz ranks overall media awareness and strength of a school’s ‘brand’ or reputation, the Global Language Monitor included specialty schools, which were included in the College category with the exception of the online universities, which was assigned to the University category.

In the University category, the University of Michigan moved up three places to the top spot, while Harvard saw a decline in Media Buzz citations of some 20%. Other major movers include MIT jumping from No. 16 to No. 2 and North Carolina, another public ivy, movinginto the Top Ten, with California—Berkeley moving from No.10 to No. 6.

In the College category, Wellesley overtook Colorado College, Williams and Amherst to claim the No. 1 position, a first for a women’s college. Pomona College, one of California’s Claremont Colleges re-emerged in the Top Ten, and Eugene Lang College of New School University debuted at a very strong No. 9.

The Top Specialty schools listed in their categories as well as overall rank are listed below.

  • Top Business school was Babson College was the Top Business (67 overall, college).
  • Top Art and Design schools were Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) (27 overall, college), Pratt Institute (28 overall, college), and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (47 overall, college).
  • Top Engineering school was The Cooper Union (38 overall, college).
  • Top Music Schools were the Julliard School (50 overall, college), the New England Conservatory of Music (96 overall, college), and Berklee College (99 overall, college).
  • Top Online/For Profit University was the University of Phoenix, USA (37 overall, university).
  • Top Christian was Wheaton College, IL (16 overall, college),
  • Top Military Academies were the United States Naval Academy (20 overall, college), the United States Military Academy (48 overall, college) and the United States Air Force Academy (61 overall, college).

The 73-page guide is available for download from the Global Language Monitor site. The cost is $29.95.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

English has become the first truly global language with some 1.53 billion speakers as a first, second or auxiliary language. Paul JJ Payack examines its impact on the world economy, culture and society in A Million Words and Counting (Citadel Press, New York, 2009).

The current estimate for the number of words in the English Language stands at 1,002,116.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, send email to info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

-30-30-30-

 

University Rankings Top 125 – Fall 2009

The Top 125 Universities ranked by TrendTopper MediaBuzz.

Return to main College Rankings page.

 

 

Universities
Rank
1 University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, MI
2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA
3 Harvard University, MA
4 Columbia University, NY
5 University of Chicago, IL
6 University of California-Berkeley, CA
7 University of Wisconsin-Madison , WI
8 Stanford University, CA
9 University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, NC
10 Cornell University, NY
11 Yale University, CT
12 Princeton University, NJ
13 University of Pennsylvania, PA
14 University of California-Los Angeles, CA
15 University of Washington, WA
16 University of Minnesota, MN
17 New York University, NY
18 University of California-San Diego, CA
19 Johns Hopkins University, MD
20 Ohio State University-Columbus, OH
21 University of Virginia, VA
22 U. of California, Davis, CA
23 Georgia Institute of Technology, GA
24 Duke University, NC
25 Boston University, MA
26 University of Texas-Austin, TX
27 University of Florida, FL
28 University of California-Santa Barbara, CA
29 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign, IL
30 Boston College, MA
31 U. of California, Irvine, CA
32 University of Georgia, GA
33 Northwestern University, IL
34 Pennsylvania State University, PA
35 Rutgers University, NJ
36 Purdue University, IN
37 University of Phoenix, AZ
38 University of Southern California, CA
39 University of Pittsburgh, PA
40 SUNY Stony Brook, NY
41 University of Indiana–Bloomington, IN
42 University of Iowa, IA
43 California Institute of Technology, CA
44 Georgetown University, DC
45 Brown University, RI
46 Washington University in St. Louis, MO
47 Syracuse University, NY
48 George Washington University, DC
49 University of Connecticut, CT
50 Texas A&M University, TX
51 Emory University, GA
52 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY
53 Vanderbilt University,TN
54 The Citadel, SC
55 University of Notre Dame, IN
56 Case Western Reserve, OH
57 University of Colorado–Boulder, CO
58 Carnegie Mellon University, PA
59 University of Arizona, AZ
60 University of Nebraska–Lincoln, NB
61 Dartmouth College, NH
62 University of Miami, FL
63 University of Rochester, NY
64 University of Maryland-College Park, MD
65 Tufts University, MA
66 American University, DC
67 Michigan State University
68 Clemson University, SC
69 Brigham Young University, UT
70 Auburn University, AL
71 Rice University, TX
72 Tulane University, LA
73 University of Delaware, DE
74 University of Kansas
75 Fordham University, NY
76 Baylor University, TX
77 Lehigh University , PA
78 SUNY Buffalo, NY
79 Virginia Tech, VA
80 Southern Methodist University, TX
81 University of Oklahoma, OK
82 Miami University, OH
83 New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ
84 Wake Forest University, NC
85 University of Missouri–Columbia, MO
86 Brandeis University, MA
87 Marquette University, WI
88 Santa Clara University, CA
89 North Carolina State University, NC
90 Loyola Marymount, CA
91 Northeastern University, MA
92 Florida State University, FL
93 College of William and Mary, VA
94 University of San Diego. CA
95 Providence College, RI
96 CUNY Queens College, NY
97 College of New Jersey, NJ
98 Iowa State University, IA
99 Villanova University, PA
100 Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
101 CUNY Brooklyn College, NY
101 James Madison, VA
102 SUNY Purchase, NY
103 Creighton University, NE
104 Texas Christian University, TX
105 Yeshiva University, NY
106 Drexel University, PA
107 Pepperdine University, CA
108 Stevens Institute of Technology, NJ
109 SUNY Binghamton, NY
110 SUNY Albany, NY
111 Drake University, IA
112 University of Vermont, VT
113 CUNY Baruch College, NY
114 SUNY Albany, NY
115 University of Redlands, CA
116 University of Tulsa, OK
117 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA
118 Butler University, IN
119 Gonzaga University, WA
120 Valpariso University, IN
121 Bradley University, IL
122 Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CA
123 CUNY City College, NY
124 Xavier University, LA

 

 

Misc. VIII

Katrina Rewind: September 7, 2005

– Originally Published September 7, 2005 –

In commemoration of the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina making landfall on the city of New Orleans and environs, we are republishing our original report about the impact of the disaster on the English Language.

Media Abounds With Apocalyptic-type References in Coverage of Katrina

Disaster, Biblical, Global Warming, Hiroshima Top List

‘Refugee’ vs. ‘Evacuee’

San Diego, Calif. September 7, 2005. In an exclusive analysis by The Global Language Monitor, the worldwide media was found to abound in Apocalyptic-type terminology in its coverage of the unfolding disaster of Hurricane Katrina in the American Gulf States. Using its proprietary PQI (Predictive Quantities Indicator) algorithm, GLM found the ominous references to include: Disaster, Biblical, Global Warming, Hiroshima/Nuclear bomb, Catastrophe, Holocaust, Apocalypse, and End-of-the-World.

“These alarmist references are coming across the spectrum of print and electronic media, and the internet,” said Paul JJ Payack, president of GLM. “The world appears stunned that the only remaining super power has apparently been humbled, on its own soil, by the forces of nature.”

The global media are mesmerized by the constant bombardment of television images of apparently rampaging, out-of-control elements, apparently in control of a good part of New Orleans, as well as the inability of the authorities to keep their own people fed, sheltered, evacuated, and, even, from dying on the street.

‘Refugee vs. ‘Evacuee’

GLM’s analysis found, for example, that the term for the displaced, refugees, that is usually associated with places like the Sudan and Afghanistan, appeared 5 times more frequently in the global media than the more neutral ‘evacuees,’ which was cited as racially motivated by some of the Black leadership. Accordingly, most of the major media outlets in the U.S. eliminated the usage of the word ‘refugees’ with a few exceptions, most notably, the New York Times.

The September 3 edition of The Times (London) has a story to illustrate the current state of affairs. The head: “Devastation that could send an area the size of England back to the Stone Age.”

The first 100 words sum up the pervasive mood found in the GLMs analysis of the Global Media.

AMERICA comes to an end in Montgomery, Alabama.For the next 265 miles to the Gulf Coast, it has been replaced by a dangerous and paranoid post-apocalyptic landscape, short of all the things fuel, phones, water and electricity needed to keep the 21st century switched on. By the time you reach Waveland, Mississippi, the coastal town of 6,800 where corpses lie amid a scene of Biblical devastation, any semblance of modern society has gone. “

According to GLM’s analysis, the most frequently used terms associated with Hurricane Katrina in the global media with examples follow. The terms are listed in order of relative frequency.

  • Disaster — The most common, and perhaps neutral, description. Literally ‘against the stars’ in Latin. Example: ” Disaster bares divisions of race and class across the Gulf states”. Toronto Globe and Mail.
  • Biblical — Used as an adjective. Referring to the scenes of death, destruction and mayhem chronicled in the Bible. ” …a town of 6,800 where corpses lie amid a scene of Biblical devastation”. (The Times, London)
  • Global Warming — The idea that the hand of man was directly responsible for the catastrophe, as opposed to the more neutral climate change. “…German Environmental Minister Jrgen Trittin remains stolid in his assertion that Hurricane Katrina is linked to global warming and America’s refusal to reduce emissions.” (Der Spiegel)
  • Hiroshima/Nuclear Destruction — Fresh in the mind of the media, following the 60th anniversary of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. “Struggling with what he calls Hurricane Katrina’s nuclear destruction, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour shows the emotional strain of leading a state through a disaster of biblical proportions”. (Associated Press).
  • Catastrophe — Sudden, often disastrous overturning, ruin, or undoing of a system. “In the Face of Catastrophe, Sites Offer Helping Hands”. (Washington Post)
  • Holocaust — Because of historical association, the word is seldom used to refer to death brought about by natural causes. ” December’s Asian catastrophe should have elevated “tsunami” practically to the level of “holocaust” in the world vocabulary, implying a loss of life beyond compare and as callous as this might make us seem, Katrina was many things, but “our tsunami” she wasn’t. (Henderson [NC] Dispatch)
  • Apocalypse — Referring to the prophetic visions of the imminent destruction of the world, as found in the Book of Revelations. ” Call it apocalyptic. Whatever you want to call it, take your pick. There were bodies floating past my front door. ” said Robert Lewis, who was rescued as floodwaters invaded his home. (Reuters)
  • End of the World — End-time scenarios which presage the Apocalypse. ” “This is like time has stopped Its like the end of the world.” (Columbus Dispatch)

Then there are those in the media linking Katrina with the direct intervention of the hand of an angry or vengeful God, though not necessarily aligned with Americas enemies. “The Terrorist Katrina is One of the Soldiers of Allah, But Not an Adherent of Al-Qaeda,” was written by a high-ranking Kuwaiti official, Muhammad Yousef Al-Mlaifi, director of the Kuwaiti Ministry of Endowment’s research center. It was published in Al-Siyassa. (Kuwait).

List of Top Ten Hurricanes

Etymology of the Name Katrina > Catriona > Katherine

Top Ten Disasters in US History

The Climate Change Question

Retired Hurricane Names

Future Hurricane Names (Global)

Note: Hurricane Alpha has now been named marking the busiest Atlantic Hurricane season on record … therefore the tropical ‘events’ were named beta, then gamma, delta … and it seemed they would go on through the Greek Alphabet. Here’s the entire Greek Alphabet:

Katrina Disaster Buzzword Explainer

San Diego, Calif. September 2, 2005. MetaNewswire. The Global Language Monitorin response to worldwide demand, has created this Hurricane Disaster Buzzword Explainer to help readers understand the many buzzwords, acronyms, and odd turns of phrase that are being employed in relation to the Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans as it unfolds.

GLM’s List is an ongoing compilation, updated daily; we welcome contributions from around the globe.

The current list with associated commentary follows:

Acadians — French-speaking people who were expelled from Nova Scotia exactly 250 years ago and settled in the bayou. Subject of the epic poem, Evangeline, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. See Cajun.

Army Corps of Engineers — The USACE is responsible for investigating, developing and maintaining the nation’s water and related environmental resources.

Astrodome — The first enclosed stadium in the US; refugees from the SuperDome will be transported 350 miles to the Astrodome.

Bayou — A slow moving stream or river that runs through the marshlands surrounding New Orleans; home of Cajun Culture.
Big Easy — The nickname for the city of New Orleans, from the laidback lifestyle one finds there.

Breach — Sudden overpowering of a levee, or a floodwall, that allows water to seep or rush in.

Cajun — Literally, Louisianan who descends from French-speaking Acadians, who in 1755 were expelled from Nova Scotia.

Category — The intensity of a hurricane using various measurements including velocity of sustained wind. Categoies range from 1 (weakest) to 5 (strongest). Katrina peaked at Category 5.

Climate Change — The warming of the Earths atmosphere due to natural cycles (politically sensitive; believed to be primarily outside the control of man.) See Global Warming.

Creole — Derives from the Latin creare, meaning “to create.” By the nineteenth century, black, white, and mixed-race Louisianans used the term to distinguish themselves from foreign-born and Anglo-American settlers.

Cyclone — A developing tropical storm, rotating counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. Often confused with but NOT a tornado.

Eye — The center of the hurricane where the skies are clear and the wind is nearly calm.

FEMA — Federal Emergency Management Agency, branch of the US Homeland Security Department. FEMA coordinates the US Federal government’s response to national disasters.

Floating Casinos — Casinos located along the Mississippi coast bringing an annual average revenue of $2.7 billion a year to that state.

Flood Control — The building of levees, pumping stations, sea walls, etc. to keep a city safe from flooding.

Flood Stage — Flood stage is reached when the water in a stream or river over-tops the banks or levees along the banks.

Flood Wall — Narrow, steel and concrete barrier erected to keep the Mississippi River out of New Orleans.

French Quarter — The original living area of the city, now known for Jazz, Cajun cuisine, and Carnival. Located at the highest point of the city.

Global Warming — In theory, the warming of the Earths atmosphere caused primarily by human use of fossil fuels (Politically sensitive; believed to be primarily in the control of man.) See Climate Change.

Hurricane Names — Hurricanes have been named since 1953. Currently, the World Meteorological Organization maintains the alphabetically sorted list of alternating men’s and women’s names. The list was exclusively female until 1979. Names are recycled every 6 years. Influential hurricanes have their names retired.

Hurricane — A tropical cyclone with a sustained surface wind is 74 mph (118 kmh) or more. A hurricane is called a typhoon in the Pacific Ocean.

Hurricane Scale — See Categories.

Hurricane Season — The hurricane season in the Atlantic runs from June 1 to November 30; in the Eastern Pacific, the season begins on May 15 and ends on November 30.

Hurricane Watch/Warning — An official warning that a hurricane is expected to hit a specific area of the coast with 36 hours (watch) or within 24 hours (warning).

Isobar — Isobars around a cyclone are lines on a map that signify the same barometric pressure.

Katrina — The 11th tropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season.

Knot — Wind speed equal to 1.15 Miles Per Hour (MPH) or 1.9 Kilometers Per Hour (KM/HR).

Lake Pontchatrain — Actually, an arm of the sea that borders on New Orleans. Lake Pontchatrain is half the size of the state of Rhode Island.

Levee — Colossal earthen barriers erected to keep water out of the city. Once breeched, levees hinder relief efforts by holding the water inside the city. New Orleans has 350 miles of hurricane levees; they were built to withstand a fast-moving Category 3 storm. Katrina was a Category 4+ storm.

National Guard — Military units organized at the state level to protect the citizens of an individual state.

Norlins — Local pronunciation of the name of the city of New Orleans.

Public Health Emergency — Cholera and typhoid are among the concerns caused by contaminated water.

Pumping Stations — Massive, yet old and inefficient pump houses that would keep any seepage out of New Orleans.

Recovery — To recover the dead after search and rescue operations are complete.

Relief and Response Effort — To provide food, medical supplies and shelter to refuges of a disaster.

Sandbag — Three- to twenty-thousand pound burlap-type containers dropped from Chinook helicopters to plug breaches in levee.

Saffir-Simpson Scale — Used to give an estimate of potential damage and flooding along the coast. Wind speed is the determining factor in the scale. See Category.

Search and Rescue — To search for survivors.

Storm Surge — Sudden rising of the sea over its usual level, preceding the arrival of a hurricane. The Thirty-foot surge on the Mississippi coastline was the highest ever recorded for North America.

Superdome — Home to the New Orleans Saints football team, the Sugar Bowl and numerous professional football championships (Super Bowls).

Tropical Depression — An area of intense thunderstorms becomes organized into a cyclone. Maximun sustained winds reach 34 knots. There is at least one ‘closed’ isobar with a decrease in barometric pressure in the center of the storm.

Tropical Storm — Sustained winds increase to up to 64 knots and the storm begins to look like a hurricane.

Vertical Evac — Vertical evacuation, taking refuge in the top floors of a high-rise building. In this case, this sort of evacuation often proved fatal.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

Map of the United One Hundred Years in the Future

 

 

 

 

Continuing Story Lines

Martin van Buren: Old Kinderhook is OK

OK, the most widely understood word in the world

Read More

Number of Words in the English Language: 1,030,475.3 (January 1, 2015 estimate)

A New English Word Every 98 minutes. 14.7 New Words a Day

Read More

 

Recent Headlines

.

The idea of the fashion city is now a feature of the global competition between cities

..

Fashion has become increasingly intertwined with city status, domestically and globally according to recent studies. The growing competition among global cities for fashion and design as well as finance and commerce is detailed by Christopher Breward and David Gilbert in their book, Fashion’s World Cities:

The idea of the fashion city is now a feature of the global competition between cities, and has become a part of broader strategies of metropolitan boosterism that give prominence to what have become known as the ‘cultural industries.’…Permutations of [London, Paris, New York, Milan and Tokyo] and a few others have been routinely incorporated into the advertising of high fashion, after the name of a designer or brand, or etched into the glass of a shop window. In some cases the name of the fashion capital is incorporated into a brand name itself (as perhaps most famously in the case of DKNY – Donna Karan New York).

 

Hurricane Sandy: ‘Frankenstorm’ floods the English language

CNN didn’t like the nickname, saying that it “trivializes” a dangerous weather system. It banned it from CNN broadcasts. But there’s no stopping “Frankenstorm.” As this beast “barrels” up the coast and gets ready to “slam” the East Coast, “Frankenstorm” is also taking the English language by storm.

.

And the Top TV Words of the Year Are…

Television can do strange things to our speech. After watching Game of Thrones, for example, it’s hard not to talk about people in the fashion of creator George R.R. Martin. “Please meet my co-worker. This is Jim of House Finklestein, keeper of accounts, slayer of budget discrepancies, wielder of the office stapler.” In the wake of the Emmys, a media analytics company has helped quantify how popular programs and personalities are shaping our language—with a list of this year’s Top 10 television buzzwords.

Read more: http://entertainment.time.com/2012/09/25/and-the-top-television-words-of-the-year-are/#ixzz2DCK0aOFX

 

The Development of China a Concern to Western Countries

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Big Data. Ou melhor, Big Challenge

Neste ano um dos assuntos mais falados foi Big Data. Uma pesquisa no Google Trends mostra um crescimento exponencial no interesse sobre o tema. Participei também de diversas palestras e reuniões com executivos para debater o assunto, e concluí que ainda estamos discutindo muito e fazendo relativamente pouco.

Claro que existem diversos casos de sucesso, mas a maioria das empresas ainda não tem uma visão clara do que é Big Data, do seu potencial e de como alavancar esta potencialidade. O próprio conceito de Big Data ainda está um pouco nebuloso. Veja, por exemplo, o que diz o Global Language Monitor em relação ao assunto: Big Data e Cloud estão entre os conceitos de tecnologia mais confusos da década – todo mundo usa, mas sequer sabe o que significa.

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Kate Middleton spend 160,000 dollars per year to be pretty

 

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Duchess of Cambridge, darling of fashion magazines, annually spends $ 160 000 for each of its glamorous public appearances. She must pay clothing and cosmetics, not to mention the gym, according to an estimate by the magazine L’OFFICIEL (Australia). Last year, Kate Middleton reportedly spent 56,000 dollars to buy cute outfits. This year, the amount is expected to rise to 114,000 dollars depending on the magazine.

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Obscure words and London Olympics

What is common among the Dead Rubber, Eggbeater, Fletching and Pheidippidean Pheat?

These are some of the most obscure words and phrases related to the ongoing London Olympics selected by the Global Language Monitor (GLM). “The history of the Olympic Games spans over 2800 years, with the Games themselves persisting for over 1,000 years in the ancient world,” says Paul J J Payack, President of GLM. “The Games have garnered a rich tapestry of linguistic innovation concerning the nature of the Games, the individual sports, and the rituals surrounding the quadrennial festival,” he said.

‘Citius, Altius, Fortius’ (Olympic History); the Olympic motto in Latin for faster, higher, stronger; tops the list of words and phrases.

 

 

Obama election tops all news stories since Year 2000

Obama election tops all news stories since Year 2000

 

More than double all the other major news events COMBINED

 

Does a new decade begin January 20th?

 

Austin, TX December 29, 2008 (MetaNewswire) – The election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States tops all major news stories since the year 2000 according to a analysis released by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com). In fact citations of Barack Obama in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, and throughout the blogosphere more than double the other main stories of the last decade combined. These include in descending order: the Iraq War, the Beijing Olympics, the Financial Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the death of Pope John Paul II, the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the Asian Tsunami.

Media, Internet & Blogosphere
Rank Story
1 Obama
2 Iraq War
3 Beijing Olympics
4 Financial Tsunami
5 Hurricane Katrina
6 Pope John Paul II
7 9/11 Terrorist Attacks
8 S. Asian Tsunami

 

 

When separating out the global print and electronic media alone, GLM found that more stories have appeared about the election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States than the number of stories about Hurricane Katrina (No. 2), the Financial Tsunami (No. 3), and the Iraq War (No. 4) combined. Next on the list of top stories since the Year 2000 include The 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (No. 5), the Beijing Olympics (No. 6), the Death of Pope John Paul II (No.7), and the South Asian Tsunami (No.8)

The stories were measured in the print and electronic media for a one year period after the event.

Print and Electronic Media
Rank Story
1 Obama
2 Hurricane Katrina
3 Financial Tsunami
4 Iraq War
5 9/11 Terrorist Attacks
6 Beijing Olympics
7 Pope John Paul II
8 S. Asian Tsunami

““The historical confluence of events in the year 2008 is unprecedented. Aside from Obama’s election, we witnessed the Financial Tsunami which appears to be a vast restructuring of the world economic order, and the Beijing Olympics, which can be viewed as the unofficial welcoming of China into the world community as a nation of the first rank,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “This lends some credence to the idea that on January 20th, 2009 we are about to embark on the second decade of the second millennium.

To the popular mind, History rarely follows chronology: the Fifties ended with JFK’s Assassination in 1963; the Sixties with the Nixon’s resignation in ‘74; the Eighties with the fall of the Berlin Wall; while the Nineties, as well as the 20th century persisted until 9/11/2001.

 

 

 

Top Word of 2009: Twitter

Followed by Obama, H1N1, Stimulus, and Vampire

“King of Pop” is Top Phrase; “Obama” is top name

Austin, TX November 29, 2009 – The Global Language Monitor has announced that Twitter is the Top Word of 2009 in its annual global survey of the English language. Twittered was followed by Obama, H1N1, Stimulus, and Vampire. The near-ubiquitous suffix, 2.0, was No. 6, with Deficit, Hadron the object of study of CERN’s new atom smasher, Healthcare, and Transparency rounded out the Top 10.

“In a year dominated by world-shaking political events, a pandemic, the after effects of a financial tsunami and the death of a revered pop icon, the word Twitter stands above all the other words. Twitter represents a new form of social interaction, where all communication is reduced to 140 characters,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of The Global Language Monitor. “Being limited to strict formats did wonders for the sonnet and haiku. One wonders where this highly impractical word-limit will lead as the future unfolds.”

Read about it in the Guardian: Twitter declared top word of 2009

WHY twitter is the most popular word of 2009 at the Huffington Post

CNET’s Don Reisinger on twitter

Mashable’s take: what else does social media have to conquer?

What it means that twitter is the 2009 Word of the Year (WeberShandwick)

The Poetry of Social Networks

The Top Words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.58 billion speakers.

The Top Words of 2009

Rank/Word/Comments

  1. Twitter — The ability to encapsulate human thought in 140 characters
  2. Obama — The word stem transforms into scores of new words like ObamaCare
  3. H1N1 — The formal (and politically correct) name for Swine Flu
  4. Stimulus — The $800 billion aid package meant to help mend the US economy
  5. Vampire — Vampires are very much en vogue, now the symbol of unrequited love
  6. 2.0 — The 2.0 suffix is attached to the next generation of everything
  7. Deficit — Lessons from history are dire warnings here
  8. Hadron — Ephemeral particles subject to collision in the Large Hadron Collider
  9. Healthcare — The direction of which is the subject of intense debate in the US
  10. Transparency — Elusive goal for which many 21stc. governments are striving
  11. Outrage — In response to large bonuses handed out to ‘bailed-out’ companies
  12. Bonus — The incentive pay packages that came to symbolize greed and excess
  13. Unemployed — And underemployed amount to close to 20% of US workforce
  14. Foreclosure — Forced eviction for not keeping up with the mortgage payments
  15. Cartel — In Mexico, at the center of the battle over drug trafficking

The Top Phrases of 2009

Rank/Phrase/Comments

  1. King of Pop –Elvis was ‘The King;’ MJ had to settle for ‘King of Pop’
  2. Obama-mania — One of the scores of words from the Obama-word stem
  3. Climate Change — Considered politically neutral compared to global warming
  4. Swine Flu — Popular name for the illness caused by the H1N1 virus
  5. Too Large to Fail — Institutions that are deemed necessary for financial stability
  6. Cloud Computing — Using the Internet for a variety of computer services
  7. Public Option — The ability to buy health insurance from a government entity
  8. Jai Ho! — A Hindi shout of joy or accomplishment
  9. Mayan Calendar — Consists of various ‘cycles,’ one of which ends on 12/21/2012
  10. God Particle — The hadron, believed to hold the secrets of the Big Bang

The Top Names of 2009

Rank/Name/Comments

  1. Barack Obama — It was Obama’s year, though MJ nearly eclipsed in the end
  2. Michael Jackson — Eclipses Obama on internet though lags in traditional media
  3. Mobama — Mrs. Obama, sometimes as a fashion Icon
  4. Large Hadron Collider — The Trillion dollar ‘aton smasher’ buried outside Geneva
  5. Neda Agha Sultan — Iranian woman killed in the post-election demonstrations
  6. Nancy Pelosi –The Democratic Speaker of the US House
  7. M. Ahmadinejad — The president of Iran, once again
  8. Hamid Karzai — The winner of Afghanistan’s disputed election
  9. Rahm Emmanuel — Bringing ‘Chicago-style politics’ to the Administration
  10. Sonia Sotomayor — The first Hispanic woman on the US Supreme Court

The analysis was completed in late November using GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI), the proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the media and on the Internet, now including blogs and social media. The words are tracked in relation to frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, factoring in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum and velocity.

The Top Words of the Decade were Global Warming, 9/11, and Obama outdistance Bailout, Evacuee, and Derivative; Google, Surge, Chinglish, and Tsunami followed. “Climate Change” was top phrase; “Heroes” was top name.

For Previous Words of the Year, go here.

 

  • Contents

    Select Category 2016 Politics (3) 9/11 (3) About (1) Ambush Marketing (1) BAI (26) BBC (1) Brand Affiliation Index (15) Business Buzzwords (3) China (3) Chinglish (6) CNN (1) Collage Art (1) Decline of English (4) Dictionaries (4) Earth Day (1) emoji (2) Eyjafjallajokull (2) Fashion (24) Fashion Capitals (23) Global English (56) High Tech Buzz (9) Hollywords (1) Kate Middleton (15) Katrina (3) Mathematics (1) MetaThought Commentary (1) NarrativeTracker (90) Business Intelligence (27) New Words (32) Number of Words (9) Obama (57) Obama-tracker (1) OK (1) Olympics (26) Paul JJ Payack (7) Pesidential Fashion (2) Political Buzzword (16) Politically Incorrect (18) Politics (80) 2008 Election (38) 2012 Election (20) PQI (23) Predictive Quantities Indicator (35) Re=Federalised US (RFUS) (1) Sarah Palin (5) Science (4) Social Media (22) Sports (4) Technical Communications (5) The Future (3) The Stonehenge Watch (1) ThoughtTopper Institute (9) Top Colleges (46) Top Stories (6) Trending Words (43) TrendTopper MediaBuzz (56) Twitter (1) Vancouver (3) Weather (1) Word of the Year (8) Words of the Century (3) Zika Virus (1)

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  • Top Words and Names Too

    Pope Francis Tops Most Talked About List by GeoBeats

  • Top Names: Pope Francis, Snowden & Kate

  • Top High Tech Words 2013

    The top tech buzzwords of 2013 from JeffJedras

  • Most Confusing Tech Buzz of 21st C.

  • Obama’s Favorite Buzzwords

  • Top HollyWords 2013

    Barry Ronge of The Times Comments

  • Top Fashion Buzz 2012/13

    Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

  • Top Words: ‘404’, Fail! and #Hashtag

That Unpronounceable Symbol Used by Prince as the World’s First Emoji

Prince Symbol

The Unpronounceable Symbol Used by Prince as the World’s First Emoji

 

April 22, 2016, Austin, Texas — There is a strong argument that yet another of Prince’s major achievements was to create either the world’s first emoji or a strong predecessor to the current Emoji phenomenon.

In 2014, the Global Language Monitor announced that the heart-shaped emoji was the top global Word of the Year, recorded in excess of 300,000,000 times.

In 2015, the Oxford Dictionary in turn, named the ‘laughing into crying’ emoji at the top of its annual word list.

However, it was in 1993, that one Prince Rogers Nelson changed his name to an unpronounceable symbol of his own devising:

Though it came to be called the ‘love symbol’ Prince soon became known as The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, or even TAFKAP.

Prince also performed, produced or managed under a number pf pseudonyms, including:

Jamie Starr
Christopher
Alexander Nevermind
The Purple One
Joey Coco

The definition of the word emoji is, according to the Oxford Dictionaries is:

“A small digital image or icon used to express an idea, emotion, etc., in electronic communication.”
Origin: 1990s: Japanese, from e ‘picture’ + moji ‘letter, character’.

Of course, this definition has already been supplanted since we are all well aware of emojis now appearing in all forms of communication and not simply the electronic kind.

Yet

Prince Symbol

certainly meets the criteria of the Oxford Dictionaries definition as an image expressing an idea, image, etc., in the case the complex reality of the Artist Formerly Known as Prince”, said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Symbol Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Microaggression is Top Word, Trump the Top Name, Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase for Worldwide English for 2015

Documenting the year 2015 through English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 16th Annual Survey of Global English

here

Top Words Pic 2015

AUSTIN, Texas, December 28, 2015 — Microaggression is the Top Word, Donald J. Trump the Top Name, and Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase, of 2015. This is the 16th Annual survey of the English language by the Global Language Monitor.

Microaggression is an academic term, related to the ‘white privilege’ movement that has moved into widespread circulation over the last generation. Donald J Trump is the US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing thr rules of American political decorum. Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
In 2014 the heart emoji was named the Top Word, the first time any emoji captured any Word of the Year honors. The Oxford Dictionaries followed in 2015 by naming the ‘laughing until tears of joy’ emoji as it top word of 2015, though there is scant evidence that any place on the planet was so afflicted.
“The English language continues its ever deeper penetration into global consciousness. Some are wary of the consequences of a single language (of the 7,000 extant human tongues) dominating the Linguasphere.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “The English Language is continuing a remarkable transformation driven by new word formations not witnessed since the Bard created nearly 2000 new words during his lifetime (1564-1616). However, this time the words are bubbling up from the entire planetary linguasphere”.
GLM’s top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.

The Top Words of 2015 follow.

Rank / Word / Comments

  1. Microaggression — The brief, everyday exchanges that send mostly unintended derogatory messages to members of various minority groups. Related to the following terms:
    1. Safe Space — In universities protecting students feelings by warnng of subject matter that might elicit discomfit or distress.
    2. Trigger — Any action that might elicit feelings of discomfit or distress.
    3. Unsafe — The feelings a student encounters when without warning they are confronted with subject matter or situations that have elicited feelings of discomfit or distress.
    4. Snowflake — What unconcerned students call those with the need for safe spaces and warnings about possible trigger events.
    5. White Privilege — Societal privileges that benefit people identified as white in Western countries, beyond what is commonly experienced by non-white people under the same social, political, or economic circumstances.
  2. Climate Changing — GLM will now use the the gerund form of the verb ‘change’ to recogize the fact of on-going, continuous change in the Earth’s Climate. Related terms:
    1. Anthropocene — the current geological age, viewed as the period during in which human activity has been a significant influence on climate and the environment;
    2. Anthropogenic — used to describe the effect of humans on the climate and the environment
  3. Refugee — A term used to describe migrants that were forced from their homeland by war or civil unrest.
  4. Migrant — A term that includes refugees from economic, climatalogical changes, and others issues not directly related to war.
  5. Thug — Brought to renewed attention by President Obama; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
  6. Trans — Abbreviation for transgender, people who identify with the opposite of their physical characteristics.
  7. Content — The Top Business Buzzword of 2015
  8. Afluenza — A theoretical malaise affecting wealthy young people, symptoms of which include a lack of motivation, feelings of guilt, and a sense of isolation.
  9. Opioids — In the US, opioid painkillers and heroin are responible for as more deaths than from automobiles and gun violence combined.
  10. Evolve — The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in political jargon. More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it only occurs until the voters first shift their views ona particular subject.
OK is the most understood word of Global English in the world, again. See more.

The Top Names of 2015

Rank /Name / Comments

  1. Donald J. Tump — The US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing the rules of American political decorum
  2. Alan Kurdi — The Syrian three-year-old whose dead body washed ashore in Bodrum, Turkey, the photo of which caused global outrage.
  3. Pope Francis — The most highly cited name, again.
  4. Xi Jinping — “Steady as she goes,” as his term proceeds as China’s paramount leader.
  5. Middle East Terrorists — Exporting death squads into the West with impunity.
  6. Putin — Short of stature, long on action.
  7. Angela Merkel — Under Merkel, Germany has accomlished its erstwhile goal of dominating Europe.
  8. Falcon 9 — The safe landing of its initial stage has been described as marking a historic step in the history of Humanity
  9. El Nino — Already there is 5x the normal snowpack in the Sierra.
  10. Princess Charlotte of Cambridge. 10-a. HRH Georgie — Nickname of Prince George of Cambridge, son of ‘Wills and Kate.
.

The Top Phrases of 2015

Rank / Phrase / Comment

  1. Migrant Crisis — Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
  2. Je Suis Charlie — Representing the universal outcry against terrorist violence, such as witnessed most recently in San Bernardino.
  3. Almond Shaming — Forty gallons of water to grow a single almond?
  4. Nation State — The migrant Crisis in Europe and the Middle East are examples of trans-national crises that transcend the idea of the Nation State. (The Nation State arose in the late 15th century with the rise of capitalism, geography, and cartography.
  5. Rogue nukes — Despite the new treaty, the fact reains that Iran can now assemble a bomb in a fortnight.
  6. Anatomically Modern Human — A class of homonids that lived as recently as 12,000 years ago.
  7. Beast Mode — Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch (American football).
  8. End of World Scenarios — A switch from previous years where clarion calls are being issued by the likes of Steven Hawking and other scientists.
  9. Digital Darkness — What happens if we can no longer access digital information? A distinct possibility at some future point. Unsolicited Advice: Keep hard copies of beloved photos.
  10. Evolve — The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in political jargon. More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it never occurs until the voters first shift their position.
  11. Two Child Policy — To the relief of much of the world, China officially relaxed its One-Child Policy.

 

Methodology: GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria: 1) found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular professional or social group or geography. The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 275,000 print and electronic global media (not limited to the English-language-based media), as well as new social media sources as they emerge.
The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century
2014:
Top Words: No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) , No. 2 Hashtag , No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases: No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot; No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names: No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War I

2013:
Top Words: No. 1 ‘404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:

Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:

Top Word: Misunderestimate

Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture. GLM analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

& the Trends They Portend" href="http://www.languagemonitor.com/word-of-the-year/top-words-for-the-first-15-years-of-the-21st-century-the-trends-they-portend/">Top Words for the First 15 Years of the 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

 

Austin, Texas, November 7, 2015 — One hundred years ago, in the year 1915 to be precise, a number of historical trends had already been set in motion that would come to dominate the rest of the century, for better or for ill. The Global Language Monitor, which tracks global trends though the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed a three-year study to better ascertain what trends are we now tracking that will portend future events.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

Find the Top Words of A.D 2115, 100 Years in the Future here.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

Find the Map of the Re-Federalized US in 2076 (and the Back Story) Here.

Re-Federated United States 2014

The results for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, C0mment, and Trend.

Top Words for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

Rank Word or Phrase Comment 21st Century Trend
1 Web/Internet (2000) Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance — also reflected in language usage Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance. Web 2.0 was the tipping point where the Internet became embedded into everyday life.
2 China (2009) 2015 is the year that China surpasses the US as the Earth’s economic engine in terms of PPE. If China holds the title for as long as the US, it will be the year 2139 before it turns over the reigns. The Rise of China will dominate 21st century geopolitical affairs like US in the 20th
3 Selfie (2013) Evidently an ego-manical madness gripped the world in 2013-14. The more people populate the planet, the greater the focus on the individual.
4 404 (2013) The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet. 404 will not merely signify the loss of an individual connection but the shutdown of whole sectors of society
5 9/11 (2001) An inauspicious start to the 21st Century. The early 20th c. saw the seeds of Bolshevism, German Nationalism, and Fascism. The seeds thus planted in the 21st c. are equally foreboding
6 OMG (2008) One of the first texting expressions (Oh my God!), another was BFF as in Best Friend Forever First sign that the Internet would change language. Basically the successor to Morse’s ‘What hath God Wrought?
7 Sustainable (’06) The key to ‘Green’ living where natural resources are wisely conserved and thus never depleted. Made small impact in 2006; its importance grows every year and will continue to do so as resources ARE depleted.
8 Hella (2008) An intensive in Youthspeak, generally substituting for the word ‘very’ as in ‘hella expensive’ The world is being subdivided into the various tribes of youth (Trans national to follow.)
9 N00b (2009) A beginner or ‘newbie’, with numbers (zeroes) replacing the letter Os, emphasizing a new trend in written English The Geeks will inherit the Earth
10 Futebol (2011) Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer was on display in Brasil Sports become an evermore global business
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
11 Nanobots and Grey Goo (’07) Have we already witnessed the most horrifying forms of warfare? Not if you haven’t envisioned … … self-replicating nanobots spewing forth ever mounting piles of grey goo might tend to dampen prospects for living things
12 Climate Change (’00) Near the top of word usage list since day one of the century. Focusing on data from the last hundred years actually obscures the magnitude of climate change; paleohistory suggests sea level changes of 300 feet
13 Derivative (’07) Financial instrument or analytical tool that engendered the Meltdown Intertwined global financial institutions have the ability to bring down the entire global electronic system if they falter
14 Apocalypse, Armageddon & variations thereof (2012) The word Apocalypse has been in ascendance in English for some 500 years. However, recent years has witnessed an unprecedented resurgence Wars and rumors of war appear to be the least of it
15 Occupy (2011) ‘Occupy’ has risen to pre-eminence through Occupy Movement, the occupation of Iraq, and the so-called ‘Occupied Territories’ The gulf between the haves and have nots, the North and the South, the 1% and all the rest has only worsened through a century of unprecedented economic, scientific and social progress
16 Tsunami (2004/5) Southeast Asian Tsunami took 250,000 lives The Southeast Asian Tsunami was a thirty-foot swell that resulted in a quarter of a million deaths. Might a 300-foot rise in sea-level engender a ‘slow Tsunami with deaths in the millions?
17 Inflation (Cosmic) (2014) OK, so that the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact. Way Cool. At the beginning of the 20th c., scientists thought our local galaxy was the entire universe; since then our view of the universe has expanded a billion billion times
18 Singularity (2015) Singularity was originally the name for Cosmic Genesis Event (the Big Bang), Spoiler Alert: Now used to describe when computer intelligence surpasses that of humans (Possibly before mid-century).
19 Global Warming (2000) Rated highly from Day One of the decade The next few hundred (or few thousand) years are gong to be a longer haul than we can now imagine
20 Refugee (2005) After Katrina, refugees became evacuees After Syria, evacuees became migrants.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
21 Emoticon (2013) Words without letters conveying emotional responses, such as smileys

:-)
Emoticons. Smileys, Emoji’s communication continues to evolve in unexpected ways
22 Emoji (2014) In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet (the alphaBIT): Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words). The arrival of the new English Alphabet (the AlphaBIT) is apparently at hand
23 Pope Francis (2013) Also Top Name of the Year for 2013. A new type of Pontiff sets the stage for all those Popes who follow …
24 WMD (2002) Iraq’s (Non-existent) Weapons of Mass Destruction The nuclear device dropped Hiroshima weighed tons, the new backpack versions, mere pounds.
25 Telomeres (2015) Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. When telomeres wear away, the chromosomes are destroyed, and death ensues. The goal: protect telomeres, extend life
26 German Ascendance (2015) One of the architects of the European Union, German Chancellor Angela Merkel continues her reign as the most powerful woman on the planet Germany’s tragic misadventures of the 20th c., belie its dominance of the Euro Zone in the 21st.
27 Anthropocene (2015) A proposed geologic epoch when humans began to impact natural processes An impact that will only grow for better or ill throughout the century.
28 God Particle (2011) The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues its quest for the Higgs boson, popularly known as the God Particle. Scientists have calculated a one in fifty million chance that the LHC will generate a small black hole that could devour the Earth.
29 Denier (2014) An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended). Political discourse continues to sink to unprecedented levels
30 Carbon Footprint (2008) The amount of carbon released in a process or activity Burning a gallon of petrol produces enough CO² to melt 400 gallons of ice at the poles.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
31 Slumdog (2008) Child inhabitants of Mumbai’s slums Slumdogs continue to multiply as MegaCities continue to seemingly endlessly expand
32 Truthiness (2006) Steven Colbert’s addition to the language appears to be a keeper; While something may not meet the standard of truth, it certainly appears to be true Truthiness seems to set the new standard, unfortunately
33 Change (2008) The top political buzzword of the 2008 US Presidential campaign Change will continue as a top word into the 22nd century — and beyond
34 Chinglish (2005) The Chinese-English Hybrid language growing larger as Chinese influence expands Chinese-English will inevitably cross-fertilize as the two great economic powers contend into the 22nd Century
35 Google (2007) Founders misspelled actual word ‘googol’ Is Google the prototype of the a new “Idea foundry’
36 Twitter (2009) The ability to encapsulate human thought in 140 characters The ability to encapsulate human thought in wisps of wind (or electron streams) will almost certainly follow
37 H1N1 (2009) More commonly known as Swine Flu Swine Flu, Bird Flu, Ebola, it will only get worse with the hand of man only abetting the enemy
38 Bubble (2007) One financial bubble after another as we move into the 21st century Let’s see: Communism, socialism, fascism, command economies, the silent hand of the market, China’s hybrid — evidently the business cycle will persist
39 The Great War (2014) The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed continue to ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c. As the Great War (and the ravages thereof} continue into the 21st c., what at the odds that its ramifications will continue throughout the 21st
40 Political Transparency (2007) A noble idea from the Campaign that was among the first casualties of the Obama Administration The explosion of knowledge portends less transparency not more …
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
To see the Top Words of 2014

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

30 -30 – 30

 

 

 

The Top Words of the Year A.D. 2115, a Hundred Years Hence

Attention: Embargoed until Tuesday, November 3, 2115. Call for exceptions. info@LanguageMonitor.com or 001 512 815 8836
Austin, Texas Federation, November 3, 2115 — The Galactic Language Monitor (GLM), which tracks global trends though the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed its 112th annual global survey.
The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 3.83 billion speakers (January 2113 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

The words 2115 came from six continents, and Earth Outposts on the Chinese Moon base, the US station on Mars, and the Titan and Ganymede field stations. The Joint Interstellar Mission are in the deep space silence period.

The results follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, and Comment.

1 RFUS Since the Great Re-federalization of the 2060s into 14 Federations (hence the new name).
2 Extinction The fourth Global extinction has been declared over, with species apparently stabilization, a loss of some 400,000 species since the beginning of the 21st Century.
3 Global Warming/Climate Change Common sense actually takes hold after the atmospheric temperature chart of the last 400,000 years and the land chart of 25,000-15,000 BCE (when the seas were some 300 feet lower as evidenced by the Bering Land Bridge) are accepted as the basis of discussion.
5 Pope Francis V After the relatively short reign of Pope Francis I, the following four pontiffs, attempt to recapture the ‘magic’.
Doomsday Asteroid Extra attention since Rogue 23 struck Inavit in 2087.
6 JNZE Contention over the Jerusalem Neutral Zone Enclave continues; however all religions still enjoy freedom of worship.
7 Nuclear Proliferation Spread of weapons beyond the Nuclear 10 continues (current Nuclear 10: US, UK, France, China, Russia, India, Pakistan, Israel, Iran, and Saudi Arabia).(North Korea was disarmed in 2039).
8 Same-old, Same old Phrase is popularized after US Presidential Election seems to be shaping up as Paul Walker Bush vs. Joseph James Obama for 2116 (after Joseph P. Kennedy IV and William Rodman “Bill” Clinton III withdrew.)
9 China Unbound China’s economy has stabilized after its economy resumed robust growth after several decades of stagnation. There is talk of it replacing the US Federation as the largest world economy, again.
10 Supervolcano After the close call with the Yellowstone Cauldron where only 1.3M died, the nations of the world begin take necessary actions.
11 Polar Vortex Since the first Internet-age struck in 2014, the phenomenon has been repeated dozens of times around the world.
12 Scots Style A new term introduced after Free Scotland asks to join the RFUS after being shunned by England for most of the 21st century.
13 World War I World War I is finally after it lasting reverberations disappear at the 200 year mark.
14 524 Million Total body count from the hemorrhagic fever outbreaks early in the century are now approaching 524 million persons. The WHO estimates that they are confident it will be in control in the next 6 months or so.
15 Sykes-Picot Lines The “lines in the sand” are still raising havoc after 200 years
Copyright ©2115 Galactic Language Monitor

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.
30 -30 – 30

 

Map of the Re-Federalised United States, AD 2076

The Back Story to The Re-Federalised United States (RFUS) in AD 2076

Attention: Embargoed until Tuesday, November 3, 2115. Call for exceptions. info@LanguageMonitor.com or 001 512 815 8836
Austin, Texas Federation, November 3, 2115 — As a public service GLM (Galactic Language Monitor, nee the Global Language Monitot) provides this overview on the birth of the Re-Federalised United States.

16th Annual Survey of the Top Words, Names and Phrases for Global English for 2015 Will be Announced December 28th.

Preliminary Top Trending Words of 2015 can be found here.

The Top Words of 2014 can be found here

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

Find the Top Words of A.D 2115, 100 Years in the Future here.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

The ‘Re-Federalists’ convinced the majority of the US electorate to call a Constitutional Convention after decades of hat came to be called ‘the Great Gridlock’.
In the aftermath, the US was ‘re-federalised’ into fourteen ‘Federations,’ the former District was made into a politics-free ‘National Monument’.
and the federal government moved into the range of Thomas Jefferson’s early estimates (extrapolated from thirty or forty into some 300,000 employees), who were equally divided among the Fourteen Federations.
The new federations were more politically, culturally and economically united, so the so-called “culture wars” of the 21st C. quickly faded away. Another interesting note: VanCity of British Columbia, and ScotsLand, of the former United Kingdom were both annexed by the RFUS, without apparent opposition.
This also lit the economic engines of most of the new states, the the US Federation jumped into a sizable lead economically over China,
again. However, China re-captured its lead as the world’s top economy later in the 21st c. and into the 22nd.
Re-Federated United States 2014

About the Galactic Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

 

Farewell to David Letterman!

Top Ten Words of 2010 on Letterman

Over the years the Global Language Monitor and David Letterman have crossed paths a number of times. This Top Ten List send-up remains among our favorites!

& ‘Thugs’" href="http://www.languagemonitor.com/global-english/the-top-trending-words-of-2015-beast-mode-for-convenience-thugs/">The Top Trending Words of 2015: ‘Beast Mode’, ‘for convenience’, & ‘Thugs’

Princess Charlotte is already Top Name

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,080,646.4 (May 8, 2015 estimate)

 

AUSTIN, Texas May 8, 2015 – Beast Mode, ‘for convenience’, and Thugs lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2015, followed by Deflate Gate, and Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor, the big data, trend tracking consultancy. This is preliminary to GLM’s thirteenth annual Word of the Year (#WOTY) rankings that will be released at year-end.

“By the fifteenth year of the 20th century, the world was already awash in the trends that would influence the rest of the century, reaching all the way into the early 21st century.” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “The twenty-first century trends that accompany these words might similarly portend far greater events than we can ever imagine today.”

The Top Trending Words of 2015 are listed below (Rank, Word, and Comment).

 

Top Trending Words for 2015

Rank Word Commentary
1 Beast Mode Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch os the Seattle Seahawks (American football}.
2 For convenience Hillary Clinton’s explanation on why she used a private email address for State Department business.
3 Thugs President used ‘thugs’ to describe Baltimore rioters; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
4 Deflate Gate Pushing the rules to the limit, as in deflating the football to give an advantage to the home team.
5 Princess Charlotte Pound-for-pound, the biggest media sensation since the Kardashians broke the Internet.
6 Deep learning Techniques used to get machines closer to intelligence, artirfical or otherwise.
7 Anthropocene A proposed geologic epoch acknowledging humans influence upon the Earth.
8 Drone (as a verb) As in, ‘the enemy located, identified, and droned’.
9 Digital Darkness What happens if we can no longer access digital information? A distinct possibility at some future point.
10 Invisible Primaries Follow the money, that also seems to work …
11 Near-Nude Have you noticed the exposure on the runways and red carpets lately?
12 Migrant-electorate (from the UK) New migrant electorate numbering some 4 million non-Brits in the UK.
13 Evolve The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in US Political jargon. More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it never occurs until the voters first shift their position.
14 Intelligence Explosion Even France is loosening up regulations in this regard.
15 Almond Shaming Among the most visible water hogs of curent California drought, now entering its fourth year.
Copyright ©2015 The Global Language Monitor

Others under consideration: Billanthropy, #BLM, and Snowpochalypse (again) A number of trending words did not yet meet the triple threshold test, but might qualify as the year further unfolds.

In December 2014, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Smiley Emoji was the Global English Word of the Year for 2014.

To see the Top Words of 2014, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) is Top Word, Pope Francis topped by Ebola as Top Name, “Hands Up, No Shoot” is Top Phrase

Pope Francis Topped by Ebola for Top Name of 2014 (see below)

“Hands Up, No Shoot” is the Top Phrase of the Year of 2014 (see below)

 

Emoji Hearts and Smily face

Documenting the year 2014 through English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 15th Annual Survey of Global English

AUSTIN, Texas, December 2014 — The Emoji ideograph for Heart (and Love) is the Top Word for 2014 according to the 15th Annual survey of the English language by the the Global Language Monitor. The Heart and Love emoji, emoticon, and variations thereof appear billions of times a day around the world — across languages and cultures. This is the first time an ideograph has captured Word of the Year honors.
The GLM Word, Phrase, and Names of the Year lists are intended to provide a history of each year since 2000 through English-language word usage.

” Each emoji represents an emotion, expression, or state of mind, or a person, place or thing, so much so, that we see the birth of the AlphaBorg or AlphaBit.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

NY Times Logo Large

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/test-yourself-emoji/

“The English Language is now undergoing a remarkable transformation unlike any in its 1400 year history — its system of writing, the Alphabet, is gaining characters at amazing rate. These character are ideographs or pictographs that are called emoji and emoticons. There are about a thousand emoji characters now officially recognized by Unicode Consortium, the official keepers of coding that forms the basis of the Internet. They regularly review new suggestions with the next 37 or so being finalized for June 2015. Then the new emoji can be embedded in any number of devices for any number of languages.

“The AlphaBIT now includes letters, numbers, the diacritical marks that compose emoticons, as well as clever electronic solutions that provide real-time access to more than hundreds of emoji.”

GLM’s top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.

Example of Emoji Keyboard

The figure below shows an Emoji keyboard for Apple. When you select the Emoji keyboard, you will see a new key on the bottom row, which looks like an stylized globe.

Emoji-Keyboard

You click this key to access a number of emoji ideographic menus for differing classes of emoji. In this way the key doesn’t present a single letter, number, or diacritical mark but rather access to hundreds or thousands of emoji.

The following figures show the Top 7 Emojis on a specialized Twitter feed for 24 hours back in June 2014. Fourteen of the Top 100 were heart-based.

Top 7 Emoji with Numbers

At last count there are now some 722 characters, with another 250 being made available during the next year, and 37 more due for approval in June 2015.

The Top Words of 2014 follow.

Rank / Word / Comments

  1. The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) — The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) is the Top Word of 2014. Each emoji represents an emotion, expression, or state of mind, or a person, place or thing.
  2. Hashtag — The re-invented pound-sign becomes evermore powerful.
  3. Vape — Smoking an electronic or e-cigarette, shorthand for vaporize, or vaping. Vapers are banned from indoor vaping in New York and other locales.
  4. Blood Moon — Four total eclipses of the moon in eighteen-month span. Some Christians see it as the presaging a “lunar apocalypse”.
  5. Nano — From Greek for dwarf, small; now 1 billionth of a meter, and any number of words surrounding nano technology.
  6. Photo Bomb — Breaking into a ‘pre-arranged” photograph without authorization resulting in often humorous outcomes.
  7. Caliphate — Literally, a land ruled by an Islamic Caliph typically governed under Sharia Law.
  8. (White) privilege — The alleged advantages of having lighter colored skin in a diverse society.
  9. Bae — Term of endearment for one’s object of desire.
  10. “Bash” Tag — Using a hashtag to undermine your frenemies.
  11. Transparency — That state of government openness that is apparently unachievable in the Western World.
  12. Sustainable — The Jimmy Carter of words; keeps getting stronger since it was WOTY in 2006.
  13. Clickbait — A link you just have to click on, though its more of a paid-for bait-and-switch.
  14. Quindecennial — Fifteen year anniversary; 2014 is the quindecinnal of the 21st century.
  15. Comet — Comet 67p has a visitor from the Rosetta Spacecraft.
OK is most understood word in the world, again. See more.
.

The Top Phrases of 2014

Rank / Phrase / Comment

  1. Hands Up, Don’t Shoot — Demonstrators’ continued chant after shooting of unarmed suspect in Ferguson, Missouri.
  2. Cosmic Inflation — The explosive growth of the Universe from virtually nothing. OK, there was something nowadays called the Singularity, sized about a billionth of a billionth of an inch. More evidence emerges that the Big Bang is settled science.
  3. Global Warming — The past is prologue here. 15,000 years ago New York City was buried under 5,000 meters of ice.
  4. Climate Change – Add ‘anthropogenic’ warming to this fact: the existence of the Bering Land Bridge 20,000 years ago suggests that the Oceans were some 100 meters lower than today. (That’s about a football field.)
  5. War on Women — In the Islamic state, women and young girls (10 and older) are stolen and then sold into sexual slavery or forced into involuntary marriages. And this after watching the beheading of their husbands, sons and brothers.
  6. All Time High — Many see this all-too-prevalent description of many world markets as more of a warning that a cause for celebration.
  7. Rogue nukes — Sources state that Iran can now assemble a bomb in two weeks. This is going from hypothetical to reality. (If true, International Inspection Effort: Fail.)
  8. Near-Earth Asteroid — Admittedly more of a space rock than an asteroid but it did create significant property damage as well as injuries before crashing into a Russian lake.
  9. Big Data — No 1 on the current High Tech Buzzword list, ushering in a global transformation in how data is processed, analyzed, and transformed into solutions.
  10. Polar Vector — An unusually long-lived Polar Outbreak plunging deep in the Southern territories.

.

The Top Names of 2014

Rank /Name / Comments

  1. Ebola — The Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a highly contagious, often fatal, hemorrhagic disease. The current outbreak started in West Africa earlier this year and has claimed some 5,000 lives as of this writing.
  2. Pope Francis — The most highly cited name, again. The former Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church, born December 17, 1936 in Buenos Aires.
  3. World War One — A conflict from the early 20th century that many historians are beginning to understand as incomplete.
  4. Médecins Sans Frontières — Doctors Without Borders, is a Nobel Peace Prize winning NGO founded in 1971. Heroically, involved in current Ebola epidemic.
  5. MH370 — Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that disappeared on Saturday, 8 March 2014, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, with 239 passengers and crew.
  6. FIFA World Cup — Better known simply as the World Cup, in 2014 won by Germany over Argentina (and heavily favored Brasil).
  7. Ice Bucket Challenge — A popular charity-based fund-raising activity to generate funds for ALS. The stunt involves pouring buckets of water and ice over the heads of the participants.
  8. Crimea — Reminder to Mr. Putin and the history-conscious (and poetically inclined): The Charge of the Light Brigade did not end well.
  9. The Mid-terms — The US national election held during non-Presidential election years, hence the name, Mid-term.
  10. NSA — The National Security Agency of the US collects intelligence through clandestine means of both foreign and (to the surprise of many) domestic sources.
  11. Prince George of Cambridge. 5a. HRH Georgie — Nickname of Prince George of Cambridge, son of ‘Wills and Kate.” Watch this space as a ‘sister?’ enters the family.
  12. Malala Yousafzai — Two years ago named co-name of the Year by GLM, this year the co-winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.The Pakistani girl shot by terrorists for promoting the right to education for girls.
  13. Xi Jinping — “Steady as she goes,” as his term proceeds as China’s paramount leader.
  14. President Obama – ‘Hope and Change’ retreats even further into history as Obama’s second term troubles mount.
  15. Sochi Olympics — The XXII Olympic Winter Games that took place 7 to 23 February 2014, in Sochi, Russia.

Methodology: GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria: 1) found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular professional or social group or geography. The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 275,000 print and electronic global media (not limited to the English-language-based media), as well as new social media sources as they emerge.
The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century

2013:
Top Words: No. 1 ‘404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:

Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:

Top Word: Misunderestimate

Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture. GLM analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

30 – 30 – 30

The Various Global Language Monitor Word of the Year Schedules

GLM Words of the Year Schedules

No. 1, Words, Names and Phrases of 2014 will be announced during the US Thanksgiving Week, Tuesday November 25

No. 2, Top Business Buzzwords (50) will be announced in early December.

No.3, Top Words of the Quindecennial of the 21st century will be announced in mid-December.

No. 4, Top Words, One Hundred Years Hence & Map of the Re-federalized United States for 2114 A.D. later in December.

Words of the Year Already Announced:

 

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,027,770.5 (July 1, 2014 estimate)

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Shut out at the Emmys, True Detective’s “Time is a flat circle” Wins Top Television Words of the Year Award

11th Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

True Detective

AUSTIN, Texas, Labor Day Weekend, 2014 — “Time is a flat circle” from True Detective’s Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) are The Top Word(s) from Television that influenced the English language from the 2013-2014 season. The Top Telewords Awards are announced in conjunction with the Prime Time Emmy awards at the beginning of the Fall television season in the US. The Prime Time Emmy Awards were broadcast from the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles on August 25th, on the NBC television network.

This is the Eleventh annual analysis by Austin-based Global Language Monitor (GLM).

“It is a pleasure to announce that the Top Telewords of the 2013-14 season are from the articulate, intelligent (though often dark) scripts of True Detective.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. “This year’s list reflects the outpouring of quality programming from all points on the globe”streaming to billions of ‘endpoints’ around the globe, be they televisions, computer screens, smart phones and/or tablets”.

Following “Time is a flat circle,” were “Bitch” from Breaking Bad,” “Sherlocked” from Sherlock, “Black List” from The Black List, ‘polar votex’ which dominated US network news through the winter, and the “Wreaking Ball” YouTube video of Miley Cyrus. Rounding out the The Top Ten were “Mortality” from Game of Thrones, “Sochi” from the Winter Olympic programming, “‘scandal” from the 2014 World Cup Brasil, and the “‘Great War” from Downton Abbey. “Georgie”, from the birth of the British Royal Heir broadcasts was this season’s Bonus Word.

This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

The Top Telewords of the 2013-2014 Season follow:

Rank/Word/TV Show/Comment

1. “Time is a flat circle” (True Detective) — Rust Cohle’s (Matthew McConaughey) philosophy of life

2. Bitch (Breaking Bad) — The philosophy of life of Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) philosophy of life
3. Sherlocked (Sherlock) — Sherlock’s secret password hidden ‘in plain sight’
4. Black List (The Black List) — There are many Black Lists in history, few of which surpass that of ‘Red’ Reddington (James Spader) for pure evil
5. P0lar Vortex (Local weather Forecasts) — Massive low pressure systems that pumped frigid polar air into North America last winter
6. Wreaking Ball (YouTube) — Massively popular Miley Cyrus video with 600,000,000 hits on You’Tube thus far
7. Mortality (Game of Thrones) — Be careful not to love ((or even be faintly attracted to) a character; they just may meet their fate this week
8. Sochi (The Sochi Winter Olympics) — Putin’s Note to Myself: 1. Conquer Sochi, 2. Conquer Crimea, 3. Conquer Ukraine
9. Scandal (FIFA World Cup Brasil 2014) — The FIFA World Cup just a warm-up to Rio 2016 Summer Olympics
10. Great War (Downton Abbey) — 60,000 British servicemen killed in a single day is bound to cast a pall over the course of a season
Bonus Word: Georgie (The Wills and Kate Chronicles, Season Three) — The birth of the British Royal Heir
The Top Telewords of previous years:

2013 — “Twerk” (VMA) Miley Cyrus’s sexually-suggestive gyrations have many precedents in American popular music from Jazz, to the Jitterbug, Elvis’ swiveling hips to hip hop.2012 — “Adorkable” from New Girl, Big Bang & Modern Family, followed by Shell Shock, Bi-polar, and Dothraki.

2011 – “SpillCam” from the Gulf Oil Spill, followed by Guido (Jersey Shore) and Reality (TV).

2010 – “Royal Wedding” of Kate Middleton and Prince William, followed by Charlie Sheen’s ‘winner,’ and Arab Spring.

2009 – “ObamaVision” — All Obama, all the time, everywhere, followed by Financial Meltdown and the death of Michael Jackson.

2008 – ”Beijing” (from the Olympics), ObamaSpeak, followed by ‘facts are stubborn things’, ‘it is what it is,’ and Phelpsian.

2007 – “Surge” from the Iraq War political and military strategy, “That’s Hot®” Paris Hilton’s popular expression that is now a registered trademark, and “D’oh!” from The Simpsons and The Simpsons Movie.

2006 – “Truthiness” and ‘Wikiality’ from the Colbert Show followed by ‘Katrina’, ‘Katie,’ and ‘Dr. McDreamy’.

2005 – “Refugee” from the coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, followed by ‘Desperation’ from Desperate Housewives and ‘Camp Cupcake’ from the on-going Martha Stewart follies.

2004 – “You’re Fired!” edged “Mess O’ Potamia” followed by “Girlie Men,” “God,” and “Wardrobe Malfunction”.

About The Global Language Monitor

“We Tell the World What the Web is Thinking.” Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “No Justice, No Peace” and are the Top Trending Phrases of the Year

No Justice No Peace
“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “No Justice, No Peace” and are the Top Trending Phrases of the Year

New Haven, CT August 22, 2014 — “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “No Justice, No Peace” are the Top Trending Phrases of 2014, according to the Global Language Monitor, which has been tracking major shifts in English language word usage since 2003. The phrases emanate from the Ferguson, MO, shooting death of the unarmed Michael Brown. Over the last ten days, protesters shouting “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “No Justice, No Peace” while holding up their hands in the universal position of surrender, have appeared in cities across the nation, in NFL stadiums, on university and college campuses, and other venues.

Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “No Justice, No Peace” have melded into any number of memes as the power of memes has demonstrated an ever larger effect on global communication”, said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst for GLM.

Hands up, No shoot
The Global Language Monitor considers a new word or phrase to have entered the English language lexicon, once it crosses a number of thresholds including appearing a minimum of 25,000 appearances in major print and electronic media, with the requisite depth and variety of publications and geographic breadth.

Though both phrases have been around for decades, the events of August 9th and the following protests have been emulated around the nation (and now the world) at a rapid pace.

Some suggest that “No Justice, No Peace” phrasing was first used in relationship to the death of Michael Griffith in Howard Beach, New York in 1987. Local newspapers reported the phrase,at that time had become a “battle cry”. Earlier this year, “No justice, no peace” was heard at the George Zimmerman murder trial, held near Orlando, where Zimmerman was acquitted on all counts of the murder of Trayvon Martin. Many see a strong similarity between the two cases.

In April, The Global Language Monitor announced Emoji to be the top trending word of the year, thus far.

In November, 2013, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Internet error code ’404′ was the Top Word of the Year of 2013.

To see the Top Words of 2013, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2014 estimate).GLM employs its TrendTracking technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. TrendTopper is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. TrendTracking Technologies analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. In 2003, GLM first coined the term ‘ephemeral data’ as an attribute of ever-expanding Big Data. GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

 

Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words of 2014

 

Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words of 2014

 

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,027,770.5 (July 1, 2014 estimate)

 

AUSTIN, Texas April 16, (Updated July 16) 2014 – Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2014, according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor. This is a preliminary to GLM’s twelfth annual Word of the Year rankings that will be released at year-end.

Emoji Headline NYT

New York Times, July 25, 2014

Emoji Story
Emoji Color

“Not only is the English language adding a new word every 98 minutes, but it is also expanding the basis of word creation. The alphabet, itself, is now expanding beyond letters to numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words),” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor.

The Top Trending Words of 2014 are listed below (Rank, Word, and Comment).

  1. Emoji — Smilies beware! The Emojis are now here. In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet: Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words).
  2. Futebol — Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer is hurtling toward Brasil
  3. Climate Change — Two interesting points to add to the debate: 1) The Earth is now approaching the temps of the Medieval Warm Period circa 1100 c.e., and 2) 8,000 years ago oceans were some 100 meters lower than present level.
  4. Ghost Plane — Malaysian Flight 360, now has echoes of the 17th c. ‘ghost ship’, the ‘Flying Dutchman’.
  5. Inflation — OK, so the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact. Way Cool.
  6. Denier — An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended).
  7. Mid-Term Elections — The Perpetual Campaign of the US rolls into 2014, a mere speedbump on the way to ’16.
  8. Crimea — Remember, Charge of the Light Brigade though highly celebrated, was an unmitigated disaster.
  9. Pontiff — Francis keeps upending convention and papal protocol.
  10. Conscious De-Coupling — Oh Gwyneth Paltrow, what hath thou wrought to the language?
  11. Quinquennium — Or lustrum (either way five-year periods) — preparing for decade-and-a-half terminology as 2015 looms.
  12. The Great War — The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c.
  13. Blood Moon — Four total eclipses of the Moon in an 18-month span. Not yet referred to as the Lunar-aplyspe — but the year is young.
  14. V. V. Putin — Proving to no longer be a Pootie-Poot (etymology unknown), the nickname of George W. Bush bestowed on him.
  15. Chinese — All things Chinese are (still) on the rise Western Powers should be acclimated to this by now.

In November, 2013, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Internet error code ‘404’ was the Top Word of the Year of 2013.

To see the Top Words of 2013, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate).GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. In 2003, GLM first coined the term ‘ephemeral data’ as an attribute of ever-expanding Big Data. GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

The ‘f-word’ is (unfortunately) the Top Hollyword of 2013

The ‘f-word’ is (unfortunately) the Top Hollyword of 2013

The Year in Film as Reflected in the English Language

11th Annual Global Survey by the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas, March 11, 2013. The word euphemistically described as the ‘f-word‘ has been named the Top Hollyword of the 2013 season by the Global Language Monitor, in its eleventh annual survey. Gravity came in second followed by slavery, minion, and operating system (OS). Rounding out the Top Ten were melancholia, secret identity, Lone Star, ‘sense of place’, and recurrence. Each year, GLM announces the words after the Oscars at the conclusion of the awards season. The 86th Annual Academy Awards ceremony was held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, March 2, 2014. Ellen Degeneres was the host for the second time.

“The word euphemistically described as the ‘f-word’ is our Top Hollyword of the Year. The seemingly all-persuasive word can be found in all major Western Cinema, evidenced by the majority of this year’s Best Picture Nominees.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor. “Though the word was first introduced onto the screen in an apparent effort to shock the audience, the word is now used for various parts of speech with several dozen differing senses (or definitions). In literature, the word was identified in the mid-1600s peaking in the 1730s. The word then re-emerged in the 1960s and its use has increased exponentially ever since.”

The Oscars also introduced a new class of Ambush Marketing (Inverse-ambush Marketing), where the sponsor ambushes the audience. In this case Samsung paid a reported $20 million fee for product placement during the live broadcast, when Ellen used a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 for the ‘spontaneous’ selfie of the star-studded audience was re-tweeted some 871,000 times within an hour.

The Top Hollywords of the 2013 season with commentary follow.

Rank / Word or Phrase / Commentary

  1. The F-Word (Wolf of Wall Street, American Hustle, etc.) — Not an endorsement but can’t ignore the preponderance of the word in contemporary film-making. Historically it was first used extensively in the late 1600s and was revived in the early 1960s.
  2. Gravity (Gravity) — Unarticulated protagonist of the film defined: Any two bodies in the universe attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Just sayin’.
  3. Slavery (12 Years a Slave) — There are said to be more slaves in the 21st c. than anytime in history. Many conjecture what they would have done during the earlier periods of human trafficking. They have the same opportunity today for that time is now.
  4. Minion (Despicable Me 2) — Literally, a servile follower or inferior. Not the aspiration of any B-School grad but much more humorous.
  5. Operating System (Her) — Breaking new ground here; not an Operating System as a protagonist (that would be 2001: a Space Odyssey’s HAL), but, rather, the first OS as a romantic lead.
  6. Melancholia (Blue Jasmine) — Kate Blanchett’s masterful rendition of what the Ancient’s considered a preponderance of ‘black bile’: melancholia.
  7. Secret Identity (Hunger Games) — Plutarch Heavensbee’s secret identity was to the benefit of millions in the Hunger Games; in real life the secret identity of Philip Seymour Hoffman led to his untimely death.
  8. ‘Lone Star’ (Dallas Buyers Club) — Like Mr. McConaughey, all things Texas (to admire or disparage), the Lone Star State are hot.
  9. Sense of Place (American Hustle, Nebraska, August (Osage County) — The world may be ‘flat’ but the sense of place appears to getting stronger in film.
  10. Recurrence (About Time) — An equation that defines a sequence recursively; e.g., something occurring again and again, and so on. An old screen formula, applied gently and lovingly here.

Previous Top Hollyword Winners include:

  • 2012 ‘Emancipation — (Lincoln, Django, Argo) — Webster says ‘to free from restraint, control, or the power of another’.
  • 2011 ‘Silence’ – Silent movies, (the Artist), a wife’s silence (Descendants), a father’s silence (Extremely Loud), silence among the trenches of WWI (Warhorse).
  • 2010 ‘Grit’ — firmness, pluck, gritty, stubborn, indomitable spirit, courageous, and brave perseverance.
  • 2009 ‘Pandora’ — from Avatar
  • 2008 ‘Jai Ho!” — Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi from Slumdog Millionaire
  • 2007 “Call it, Friendo” — from No Country for Old Men
  • 2006 “High Five!!! It’s sexy time!” — from Borat!
  • 2005 ‘Brokeback’ — from Brokeback Mountain
  • 2004 ‘Pinot’ — from Sideways
  • 2003 ‘Wardrobe malfunction’ — Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson from Super Bowl XXXVIII

 

Methodology. Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Top Word of 2013: ‘404’ followed by fail!, hashtag, @pontifex, and The Optic

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Toxic Politics is the Top Phrase, and Pope Francis the Top Name

Documenting 2013 by English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 14th Annual Survey of Global English

Number of Words in the English Language: 1,025,109.8 (January 1, 2014 estimate)

OK is most understood word in the world, again.

AUSTIN, Texas November 6, 2013 — The Global Language Monitor has announced that ‘404’ is the Top Word, ‘Toxic Politics’ the Top Phrase and Pope Francis the Top Name of 2013 in its 14th annual global survey of the English language. 404 was followed by fail, hashtag, @pontifex, and the Optic. Rounding out the top ten were surveillance, drones, deficit, sequestration, and emancipate. 404 is the near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet, augmenting its original use as ‘page not found’. The single word fail is often used together with 404 to signify complete failure of an effort, project, or endeavor.

“404 has gained enormous attention the world over this year as systems in place since World War II, which many see as the beginning of the contemporary era, are in distress or even failure.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

“The recent ObamaCare launch debacle in the US is only a representative example of a much wider system fail, from the political deadlock in the US Government, to the decline of the dollar, to the global web of intrigue and surveillance by the NSA, to the uncertainty regarding the European Union, and the on-going integration of China and other rising powers, such as India and Brazil into the global economic system.

Our top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.”

The GLM Word, Phrase, and Names of the Year lists provide a history of each year since 2000 through English-language word usage.

Girl with Big Eyes Reading

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Click here for the Rediff Slide Show

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The Top Words of 2013 follow Rank / Word / Comments

  1. 404 — The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet.
  2. Fail — The single word fail, often used as a complete sentence (Fail!) to signify failure of an effort, project, or endeavor.
  3. Hashtag — The ‘number sign” and ‘pound sign’ reborn as the all-powerful Twitter hashtag.
  4. @Pontifex — The Hashage of the ever-more popular Pope Franciscus (Francis).
  5. The Optic — The ‘optic’ is threatening to overtake ‘the narrative’ as the Narrative overtook rational discourse. Does not bode well for an informed political discussion.
  6. Surveillance — The revelation of the unprecedented extent of spying by the NSA into lives of ordinary citizens to the leaders of the closest allies of the US.
  7. Drones — Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) that are piloted remotely or by on-board computers used for killing scores or even hundreds of those considered enemy combatants of the US.
  8. Deficit — Looks like deficit-spending will plague Western democracies for at least the next decade. Note to economists of all stripes: reducing the rate of increase of deficit spending still increases the deficit.
  9. Sequestration — Middle English sequestren, from Old French, from Latin sequestrare, to hide away or isolate or to give up for safekeeping.
  10. Emancipate — Grows in importance as worldwide more women and children are enslaved in various forms of involuntary servitude. Read more

Phony, the Optic, and Brycgwyrcende* join the battle for 2013 Top Word of the Year

Top Trending Words of 2013, Mid-year Edition

AUSTIN, Texas, August 8, 2013 – The words ‘phony’, ‘the Optic’, and ‘Brycgwyrcende’* have joined the battle for 2013 Top Word of the Year, according to the Global Language Monitor, the world leader in big data language analytics.

The Mid-year outlook for the Top Trending Words of 2013 already include words related to: Kate’s Royal Offspring, Near-Earth Objects including Comets, asteroids and/or meteors, Nukes (rogue or otherwise), a fascinating Internet meme (or two), China continuing in it role as the world’s economic engine, an unknown technical buzzword that will seemingly spring out of nowhere (ala #hashtag), and various catastrophic scenarios with names containing the prefix franken- or the suffix – pocalypse

These words have been compiled from word trends in global English currently tracked by the Global Language Monitor. In December 2012, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that ‘ Apocalypse’ was the Top Word, ‘Gangnam Style’ the Top Phrase; and ‘Newtown’ and ‘Malala (Yousafzai) the Top Names of 2012 in its annual global analysis of the English language.

“With 1.83 billion speakers and a new word created every 98 minutes or so, clever, interesting, and creative neologisms inevitably appear — and now from any point on the planet,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.

To see the Top Words of 2012, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate).

Read more

Top Trending Words of 2013, Spring Update

Kate’s Royal Offspring, Crazy New Weather Term, and Pontiff

Spring Update

AUSTIN, Texas March 13, 2013 – The Spring outlook for the Top Trending Words of 2013 include words related to: Kate’s Royal Offspring, Near-Earth Objects including Comets, asteroids and/or meteors, Nukes (rogue or otherwise), a fascinating Internet meme (or two), China continuing in it role as the world’s economic engine, an unknown technical buzzword that will seemingly spring out of nowhere (ala #hashtag), and various catastrophic scenarios with names containing the prefix franken- or the suffix – pocalypse

This is according to current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor. In December, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that ‘ Apocalypse’ was the Top Word, ‘Gangnam Style’ the Top Phrase; and ‘Newtown’ and Mala the Top Names of 2012 in its annual global analysis of the English language.

“The year 2013 looks to be another vibrant year for the English language with word creation again driven by events both scheduled and unanticipated,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. “With 1.83 billion speakers and a new word created every 98 minutes or so, clever, interesting, and creative neologisms inevitably appear — and now from any point on the planet.”

To see the Top Words of 2012, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate).
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Top Trending Words of 2013, Spring Update,

  1. Royal Birth — Come July, the opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympics will look like a garden party compared to the ensuing hubbub over the Royal Birth.
  2. Crazy New Weather Term — Derecho? Haboob? SuperStorm? As changes due to global warming become more pronounced, terms are emerging from the meteorologist’s jargon trove.
  3. -alypse — Top trending suffix on the list. Engenders the creation of catastrophic-related, apocalyptic terms.
  4. Pontiff — 1.2 Billion Catholics tweeting “The pontiff is dead (has resigned); long live the Pontiff!”
  5. Global Warming — Perennially a Top Five Word (when matched with Climate Change), on top of mind to millions around the planet.
  6. Globe Circulating Meme — Probably surpassing the Angelina Jolie Leg meme that resulted from her dramatic stance at the 2012 Oscars.
  7. MOOCs — Massive Online Open Courses. What’s a decent student:teacher ratio when there 170,000 students in one course
  8. Sustainable — Top Word of the Year in 2006 affecting the language in ever more aspects and senses.
  9. Franken — Top trending prefix on the list. Expanded in meaning to include any human-instigated or -influenced natural disaster.
  10. Comet — Replacing Near-Earth Asteroid: Yet another year, another celestial object, this comet may be the brightest in a thousand years (late ’13 rendezvous.)
  11. Twitflocker — Our annual stand-in The Next Big Thing in technology.
  12. Debt — The debt bomb inflicts ever more ‘collateral damage’ upon the Western democracies.
  13. Solar max — 2013 is the actual peak of the 11-year sunspot cycle; in 1854 solar storms melted telegraph wires.
  14. Rogue nukes — Iran and North Korea will be the focus of attention here
  15. Euro- — The prefix will be used for any number of terms, few (if any) favorable.
  16. China Rising — The Sun has not yet set on its economic expansion

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GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.
For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

The Battle for the Top Word of the Year (#WOTY)

MicroEssay: The Future of Global English (400 Years in the Future)

A Short Essay by Paul JJ Payack

The conquest of Global English is nearly complete. It is impossible to hold back this tide. The Tsunami of English has already swept over the earth. The question now is how to adjust to this new reality.

I have several suggestions. The first would be to master the language. Yes, acknowledge the sea-change, disassociate yourself from any political misgivings — and get on with it. Global English is here and now — and here to stay. Global English will reside, preside and thrive. At least in some form. Here are some possible threads of evolution (or devolution) of the language over the next 400 years. I chose this perspective because that is the same temporal distance we are from the days of Shakespeare and the King James Bible.

Keeping in mind that the best way to predict the future is to read the past, here are a number of differing scenarios, one of which will be the future of Global English

1. Cyber English: The robots take control of the language. This form of English would be ‘clipped’ and very precise (no ‘fuzzy’ logic here). Come to think of it, this would be a great leap backward to the time of the King’s English, as spoken in, say, Colonial India.

2. The Romanticization of English: The Language devolves into various local dialects that in time become robust languages in themselves. The precedent for this, of course, is Latin splintering into the Romance Languages (Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish). As Latin is still the Official Language of the Vatican City state, English will remain spoken in certain enclaves in North Carollina, western Virginia, and in the Desert Southwest.

3. Return to Proto-Indo-European. Not as outlandish as it might seem, as the Green movement decries the technological basis of much of Global English, and in a Back-to-Basics promotes the original P-I-E as a ‘green language’.

4. English captured by the Chinese: the Middle Kingdom strikes back and begins to stake a claim in English Language ownership, much as America has done so during the last century. The Chinese prove to be excellent caretakers of the language and develop many interesting ways to extend it throughout the Earth and beyond.

5. Revenge of the Nerds: Leetspeak Strikes Back. The Nerds control the language. All words have dozens of spellings and meanings. Letters, numbers and symbols intermix. Exposition is heavily encrypted. The precedent: The English language before the Noah Webster and the OED. Shakespeare’s many variations on his name is mere child’s play to the near-infinite variety of spelling your children’s children will be able to use for their names.

6. The Number of Words in the English Language
Academics will no longer fret at counting the number of words because the conquest of English will no longer be tainted by political, cultural, and social concerns. Once freed from these concerns, Everyone will be free to count words in the same manner that their scientific colleagues count the number of galaxies, stars and atomic nuclei.

We will then be able to count ALL the words: every name of every fungus, all the technical jargon, YouthSpeak, all the –Lishes, everything.

Dictionaries will not longer be the arbiters what’s a word? Questions of standing the test of time will be rendered inoperable. Words will bubble forth as a frothy sea-foam of insight and meaning. If a word is used by millions or even thousands of influential elites, regardless of class or any form of identity (gender, ethnic, class, national, or social) it will be deemed a word and recorded for posterity.

7. There will be no words only thoughts. This is a rather difficult scenario to explore, since words all but disappear. Dictionaries will be replaced by something much more ethereal, sort of like a directory of dreams, ideas and ideals.

The language will swell to tens of millions of ‘words’ and the fact of its crossing the 1,000,000, word barrier will be looked upon something quite quaint that happened in the ‘classic days’ of ‘Global English language (long before it assumed its then-current exalted position. In all probability, the words in this essay may seem closer to the works of Shakespeare and those of the King James Bible than those of the, say, twenty-fifth Century.

 

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& Non-binary" href="http://www.languagemonitor.com/olympics/top-trending-words-and-phrases-of-2016-bigly-brexit-non-binary/">Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016: Bigly, Brexit & Non-binary

Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016, Thus Far: Bigly, Brexit & Non-binary

AUSTIN, Texas July 15-17, 2016 – Bigly, Brexit, and ‘Non-binary’ lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2016 thus far, followed by the Prince Symbol, Zika, Gun Violence / Gun Culture, Safe Place, Heroin and fentanyl according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor, the big data, trend tracking consultancy.

This is preliminary to GLM’s fourteenth annual Word of the Year (#WOTY) rankings that will be released on November 16, 2016.

“By the sixteenth year of the 20th century, the world was already awash in the trends that would influence the rest of the century, reaching all the way into the early 21st century.” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor. “The twenty-first century trends that accompany these words might similarly portend far greater events than they represent today..”

The Top Trending Words of 2016 are listed below (Rank, Word, and Comment).

Top Trending Words for 2016, thus far.

Rank, Word, Commentary

1. Bigly — Things trending larger … bigly. Almost everything trended bigly thus far in 2016 from politics and foreign affairs, to terrorism and gun violence,
2, Brexit — The British Exit from the European Union provides a new vocabulary for future political breakups: Scotxit, Quebecxit and, even, Texit.
3. Non-binary — A legal term for a gender identity between male and female

4.

Perhaps the first emoji. The unpronounceable symbol representing the singer formerly known as Prince.

5. Zika — Please note that Rio is not on this list; its spot was taken by the Zika Virus. A potential global pandemic with Rio as its epicenter.
6. Gun Culture / Gun Violence — Gun Culture/Gun Violence are neck-and neck in the ranking here.
7. Safe Place — In the US, places where students can retreat to avoid hearing unpleasant words; in the world, places protected from rape, crucifixion, being sold into slavery, and the like.
8. Heroin and Fentanyl — More deaths from opioids in the US than gun violence and auto accidents combined. Where is the outrage?
9. Hooya ha tah iti bin — “Son please don’t smuggle yourself.” Transliteration of a Somali mother’s plea to her son not to join the refugee flow into Europe.
10. Memory Care — Current euphemism for Alzheimer care.
11. Presumptive — Presumptive Republican nominee, presumptive Democratic nominee, presumptive prime minister, etc. In 2016 the word ‘presumptive’ is bigly.
12. Texticate — Facebook, messaging, twitter, email … everything is reduced to text… the textication of the world as we know it.
13. Clintonworld — The private world of Hil and Bill where many of the laws of the political world seem to be suspended. Cf. Steve Job’s ‘reality distortion field’.
14. Trumpism — The emerging political philosophy of the presumptive Republican candidate,whatever that may be.

15. Tennessine — New element on the periodic table, with Atomic number 117 and the symbol Ts. Some wags say to honor Bluegrass, more likely the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.Others under consideration a number of trending words that not yet meet the triple threshold test, but might qualify as the year further unfolds.

In December 2015, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that Microaggression in its various manifestations was the Top Word of 2015.— The brief, everyday exchanges that send mostly unintended derogatory messages to members of various minority groups.

Related to the following terms:
Safe Space — In universities protecting students feelings by warning of subject matter that might elicit discomfit or distress.
Trigger — Any action that might elicit feelings of discomfit or distress.
Unsafe — The feelings a student encounters when without warning they are confronted with subject matter or situations that have elicited feelings of discomfit or distress.
Snowflake — What unconcerned students call those with the need for safe spaces and warnings about possible trigger events.Migrant Crisis was the Top Phrase of 2015, while Donald J. Trump, was the surprise Top Name of 2015.To see the Top Words of 2015, and the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st century go here.The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.About the Global Language MonitorIn 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, as well as the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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That Unpronounceable Symbol Used by Prince as the World’s First Emoji

Prince Symbol

The Unpronounceable Symbol Used by Prince as the World’s First Emoji

 

April 22, 2016, Austin, Texas — There is a strong argument that yet another of Prince’s major achievements was to create either the world’s first emoji or a strong predecessor to the current Emoji phenomenon.

In 2014, the Global Language Monitor announced that the heart-shaped emoji was the top global Word of the Year, recorded in excess of 300,000,000 times.

In 2015, the Oxford Dictionary in turn, named the ‘laughing into crying’ emoji at the top of its annual word list.

However, it was in 1993, that one Prince Rogers Nelson changed his name to an unpronounceable symbol of his own devising:

Though it came to be called the ‘love symbol’ Prince soon became known as The Artist Formerly Known as Prince, or even TAFKAP.

Prince also performed, produced or managed under a number pf pseudonyms, including:

Jamie Starr
Christopher
Alexander Nevermind
The Purple One
Joey Coco

The definition of the word emoji is, according to the Oxford Dictionaries is:

“A small digital image or icon used to express an idea, emotion, etc., in electronic communication.”
Origin: 1990s: Japanese, from e ‘picture’ + moji ‘letter, character’.

Of course, this definition has already been supplanted since we are all well aware of emojis now appearing in all forms of communication and not simply the electronic kind.

Yet

Prince Symbol

certainly meets the criteria of the Oxford Dictionaries definition as an image expressing an idea, image, etc., in the case the complex reality of the Artist Formerly Known as Prince”, said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Symbol Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Microaggression is Top Word, Trump the Top Name, Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase for Worldwide English for 2015

Documenting the year 2015 through English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 16th Annual Survey of Global English

here

Top Words Pic 2015

AUSTIN, Texas, December 28, 2015 — Microaggression is the Top Word, Donald J. Trump the Top Name, and Migrant Crisis the Top Phrase, of 2015. This is the 16th Annual survey of the English language by the Global Language Monitor.

Microaggression is an academic term, related to the ‘white privilege’ movement that has moved into widespread circulation over the last generation. Donald J Trump is the US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing thr rules of American political decorum. Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
In 2014 the heart emoji was named the Top Word, the first time any emoji captured any Word of the Year honors. The Oxford Dictionaries followed in 2015 by naming the ‘laughing until tears of joy’ emoji as it top word of 2015, though there is scant evidence that any place on the planet was so afflicted.
“The English language continues its ever deeper penetration into global consciousness. Some are wary of the consequences of a single language (of the 7,000 extant human tongues) dominating the Linguasphere.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor. “The English Language is continuing a remarkable transformation driven by new word formations not witnessed since the Bard created nearly 2000 new words during his lifetime (1564-1616). However, this time the words are bubbling up from the entire planetary linguasphere”.
GLM’s top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.

The Top Words of 2015 follow.

Rank / Word / Comments

  1. Microaggression — The brief, everyday exchanges that send mostly unintended derogatory messages to members of various minority groups. Related to the following terms:
    1. Safe Space — In universities protecting students feelings by warnng of subject matter that might elicit discomfit or distress.
    2. Trigger — Any action that might elicit feelings of discomfit or distress.
    3. Unsafe — The feelings a student encounters when without warning they are confronted with subject matter or situations that have elicited feelings of discomfit or distress.
    4. Snowflake — What unconcerned students call those with the need for safe spaces and warnings about possible trigger events.
    5. White Privilege — Societal privileges that benefit people identified as white in Western countries, beyond what is commonly experienced by non-white people under the same social, political, or economic circumstances.
  2. Climate Changing — GLM will now use the the gerund form of the verb ‘change’ to recogize the fact of on-going, continuous change in the Earth’s Climate. Related terms:
    1. Anthropocene — the current geological age, viewed as the period during in which human activity has been a significant influence on climate and the environment;
    2. Anthropogenic — used to describe the effect of humans on the climate and the environment
  3. Refugee — A term used to describe migrants that were forced from their homeland by war or civil unrest.
  4. Migrant — A term that includes refugees from economic, climatalogical changes, and others issues not directly related to war.
  5. Thug — Brought to renewed attention by President Obama; from the Hindi (and Sanskrit) words describing Aryan assassins.
  6. Trans — Abbreviation for transgender, people who identify with the opposite of their physical characteristics.
  7. Content — The Top Business Buzzword of 2015
  8. Afluenza — A theoretical malaise affecting wealthy young people, symptoms of which include a lack of motivation, feelings of guilt, and a sense of isolation.
  9. Opioids — In the US, opioid painkillers and heroin are responible for as more deaths than from automobiles and gun violence combined.
  10. Evolve — The evolution of the word ‘flip-flop’ in political jargon. More like ‘survival of the fittest,’ it only occurs until the voters first shift their views ona particular subject.
OK is the most understood word of Global English in the world, again. See more.

The Top Names of 2015

Rank /Name / Comments

  1. Donald J. Tump — The US presidential contender who appears to be re-writing the rules of American political decorum
  2. Alan Kurdi — The Syrian three-year-old whose dead body washed ashore in Bodrum, Turkey, the photo of which caused global outrage.
  3. Pope Francis — The most highly cited name, again.
  4. Xi Jinping — “Steady as she goes,” as his term proceeds as China’s paramount leader.
  5. Middle East Terrorists — Exporting death squads into the West with impunity.
  6. Putin — Short of stature, long on action.
  7. Angela Merkel — Under Merkel, Germany has accomlished its erstwhile goal of dominating Europe.
  8. Falcon 9 — The safe landing of its initial stage has been described as marking a historic step in the history of Humanity
  9. El Nino — Already there is 5x the normal snowpack in the Sierra.
  10. Princess Charlotte of Cambridge. 10-a. HRH Georgie — Nickname of Prince George of Cambridge, son of ‘Wills and Kate.
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The Top Phrases of 2015

Rank / Phrase / Comment

  1. Migrant Crisis — Migrant Crisis summarizes the movement of some one million migrants and/or refugees from the Middle East to Europe (predominately from Syria, Irag and , Afganistan), as well as North African countries. This is the largest human migration since World War II.
  2. Je Suis Charlie — Representing the universal outcry against terrorist violence, such as witnessed most recently in San Bernardino.
  3. Almond Shaming — Forty gallons of water to grow a single almond?
  4. Nation State — The migrant Crisis in Europe and the Middle East are examples of trans-national crises that transcend the idea of the Nation State. (The Nation State arose in the late 15th century with the rise of capitalism, geography, and cartography.
  5. Rogue nukes — Despite the new treaty, the fact reains that Iran can now assemble a bomb in a fortnight.
  6. Anatomically Modern Human — A class of homonids that lived as recently as 12,000 years ago.
  7. Beast Mode — Going all out, excessively so, in the take-no-prisioners style of Marshawn Lynch (American football).
  8. End of World Scenarios — A switch from previous years where clarion calls are being issued by the likes of Steven Hawking and other scientists.
  9. Digital Darkness — What happens if we can no longer access digital information? A distinct possibility at some future point. Unsolicited A