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Zika Virus’ Growing Impact on the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics

 

First Independant Measurement of the Impact of the Zika Virus on the Rio Games

Impact on the Games Themselves  Growing Steadily

Significant Impact on Sponsors Varies by Sponsor

 

March 22, 2016 Austin, Texas — In the first independant analysis of the impact of the Zika Virus on the Rio Summer Games, the Global Language Monitor (GLM) has found two significant trends:

  • There is a significant and growing impact on the Games themselves, and
  • There is a greater impact on individual sponsors.

This analysis is part of GLM’s longitudinal study stretching back to the Summer Games in Beijing (2008) and  forward to the Winter Games in Beijing in 2022.  The ongoing study uses GLM’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) to track how often brand names were linked to the Olympics in global print and electronic media and social networks.

When tracking non-branded entities, such as the Zika Virus, GLM uses a slightly modified variation of the BAI called the Entity Tracking Index (EAI).

Read the Story Here
Read the Story Here

 

The graphic below shows the increasing Zika Virus’ Entity Tracking Index (EAI) numbers over the last six weeks.


Zika EAI Rio Olympics

 

Below is a different view of  the  Zika Virus’ Entity Tracking Index (EAI) numbers over the last six weeks.

 

Zika Rio Olympics Bar Charts

 

“Of particular interest is the wide variation found in the EAIs between Major Sponsors.

“When tracking brand equity, the early numbers provide strong indicators of actual performance during the Games, providing a snapshop of the intense battle already being waged between the Official Olympic Sponsors and the Non-affiliated Marketers, also called Ambush Marketers or Ambushers,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief world Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

“With the EAI, we are masking the sponsors’ numbers at this point, though these are available immediately by subscription to our service by the sponsor.”

Request the EAI analysis for your organization now:   info@LanguageMonitor.com or call +1.512.815.8836 .

The customized report is available with individual details for your sponsorship;  the report will be delivered to you within 24 hours of receipt of your order.

 

Zika Virus Impacts Individual Sponsors to Various Degrees Zika Virus Impacts Individual Sponsors to Various Degrees
Zika Virus Impacts Individual Sponsors to Various Degrees

 

For the Rio Summer Games 2016 there are eleven Official Top Sponsors:

Coca-cola, Bridgestone, McDonald’s, P&G, GE, Omega, Samsung, Panasonic, Dow, Visa Card, and Atos Origin.  Currently GLM is tracking some eleven  Non-affiliated Marketers competing against the Top Sponsors, including:  IBM Global Services, Siemens AG, Pepsi, Nike, DuPont, Starbucks, Red Bull, Rolex, Philips, Unilever, and Subway, among others.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has strict regulations in place to protect its official international partners and prevent ambushing official Olympic partners and sponsors, such as Rule 40 of the Olympic Charter which prohibits athletes working with non-affiliated marketers during the Games, though there are reports that the rule is being modified for RIO.

Methodology.  Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 350,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

For more information call +1.512.815.8836 or email: Info@LanguageMonitor.com

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Final Hollywood Awards of the 2015 Season — Top HollyWords

Revenant Takes Top Honors

Thirteenth Annual Survey

The Year in Film as Reflected in the English Language

 

Austin, Texas, March 21, 2016.   ‘Revenant’ from The Revenant has been named the Top HollyWord of the Year by the Global Language Monitor in its thirteenth annual global survey Internet MediaBuzz Survey.

These were followed by ‘ ’ from Selma, and ‘’ from Alice, “ ” from Boyhood, and ‘best and whitest’ from the awards ceremony itself rounded out the top five.

Each year, GLM announces the words after the Oscars at the conclusion of the motion picture awards season. The 87th Annual Academy Awards ceremony was held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, February 22, 2014.  Neil Patrick Harris was the host for the first time, to generally mixed reviews.

“Words from American Sniper and Selma took top honors in a year of taunt scripts and memorable quips” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor.  “The films this year spanned an exceptionally wide range of topics from the inner workings of the mind to the farthest reaches of outer space.

The Top Hollywords of the 2015 season with commentary follow.

Rank / Word or Phrase / Commentary

  1. Revenant (The Revenant) — the word itself is a ‘revenant’ — returning from the dead.
  2. Brooklyn (Brooklyn) — Brooklyn, itself , is enjoying an unprecedented renaissance … since the Dodgers abandoned the Borough for SoCal.
  3. Schiaparelli — (The Martian) — A name not mentioned in the film, but the Italian Astronomer who first caused the first Mars s hypothesis about Martian ‘Canals’.
  4. The World (Room) — You are going to love it? Love what?  The World.
  5. Blacklist (Trombo) — The Hollywood blacklist was but a window into a country-wide hysteria.
  6. Oscars (#OscarsSoWhite) — Perhaps the longest lasting legacy from this year’s Oscars.
  7. Post-Apocalyptic (Mad Max) — It’s a relief to talk about the coming Apocalypse in past tense.
  8. Quant (Big Short) — Quants are people, too.
  9. Reality Distortion Zone (Steve Jobs) — Apparently, the Zone was more effective outside Apple, Inc. than within the Executive Ranks.
  10.  Mean Streets (Straight Outta Compton) — There are over 50,000 citations with the words ‘mean streets’ linked to Compton on Google.

Previous Top Hollyword Winners include:

  • 2014  ‘Your call.” (American Sniper) — Chris Kyle’s ultimate dilemma that he faced hundreds of times
  • 2013  The F-Word , prevalent in scores of films.
  • 2012  ‘Emancipation — (Lincoln, Django, Argo) — Webster says ‘to free from restraint, control, or the power of another’.
  • 2011  ‘Silence’ – Silent movies, (the Artist), a wife’s silence (Descendants), a father’s silence (Extremely Loud), silence among the trenches of WWI (Warhorse).
  • 2010  ‘Grit’ — firmness, pluck, gritty, stubborn, indomitable spirit, courageous, and brave perseverance.
  • 2009  ‘Pandora’ —  from Avatar
  • 2008  ‘Jai Ho!” —  Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi from Slumdog Millionaire
  • 2007  “Call it, Friendo” —  from No Country for Old Men
  • 2006  “High Five!!! It’s sexy time!”  — from Borat!
  • 2005  ‘Brokeback’ — from Brokeback Mountain
  • 2004  ‘Pinot’ — from Sideways
  • 2003 ‘Wardrobe malfunction’ — Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson from Super Bowl XXXVIII

Methodology.  Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

 

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: About

The articles included in this ThoughtTopper Institute series, were first drafted  by Paul JJ Payack during the initial days of the so-called Great Recession.  Subsequently the originals were expanded with Edward ML Peters, Ph.D and published in The Hill and other publications.

Paul JJ Payack

 The premise of the original articles was that economists and politicians had missed the essence of the profound worldwide    economic transformation that had been underway for some time and the economic restructuring would continue into the  future, if constrained by this profoundly limited vision.

In fact, the facts have borne out our original assumptions.  The Global Economic Restructuring has continued unabated.  China continues to rise, the US and the West continue to struggle.

 

 

The Lost Decade of Japan has indeed been replicated, as we  had feared.  The recovery did not mirror previous recoveries in the US.  And the traditional manufacturing sector continues to  erode.

 

beach wedding dresses

 Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor.

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D. is the the managing  director  of Austin-based ThoughtTopper Institute.

Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through  the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Settled Science

 

Phrase of the Day:  Settled Science

As thoughtful readers have learned since the launch of the Global Language Monitor in the fall of 2003, all objectivity in media is suspect, and for good reason.  The non-bias claimed on all sides of the political equation is itself, biased, since all media have come to see their particular viewpoint as objective and true, right and just, supported by the facts, scientific or otherwise, and agreed to by all learned people (who happen to agree to their particular beliefs).The fact that their audiences steadfastly agree with their positions, only serves to re-enforce their particular biases. “We all think so, so it must be true!”  (… and it is logically consistent, is a frequent addition.)

One of the most dangerous of these biases is the concept of ‘settled science’.
Science, by definition, can never be settled.

The Scientific Method has been adhered to since the Enlightenment.   It is composed of five or six steps

  1. Observation
  2. Hypothesis
  3. Experiment
  4. Record and analyze data
  5. Compare the results to the hypothesis.
  6. If necessary, either modify the hypothesis or the experiment

There is always more complete data to be found and always room for another test of the hypothesis, to ensure completeness.  

Another time-honored tradition, is the custom of employing Occam’s Razor in the decision-making process.   Occam’s Razor is stated in Latin as:  Entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem” (‘Do not multiply things without necessity).  The principle is essential for model building because for a given set of data, there is always an infinite number of models explaining the data.

In other words if you have two choices 1) a snowball moves because invisible, alien drones take it and deliver it to its target, or 2) angular momentum — you must choose No. 2 because that is the simplest.

If there is any fact in science that cannot be debated, it’s Einstein’s Theory of Relativity.  Yet nonetheless, every year there are numerous well-publicized challenges to differing aspects of the Theory. How can this be if the Theory of Relativity is ‘settled’?

The answered is because this is part of the scientific method!

Lest this be seen as an argument against human-enhanced Global Warming, please allow me to point out that this is not the case.  We consider Global Warming as close to settled science you can get but not for the reasons you might think.

Settled Science is not a new term, in fact, its use stretches back some 150 years, although the settled science that it described  would seem a Hall of Infamy in the early 21st century.

Settled Science in late 1800s:

  • The division of Humankind into ‘races’ differentiated by alleged Intellectual Potential (or limitations), Color of Skin, Shape of the head, and Geographic Location.
  • Segregation of women and girls from higher education.  Alleged reasons:  women’s brains could not deal with rigorous thinking — and men would become physically and psychologically unhinged in their presence.  
  • Excluding women from voting for much the same issues.

Settled Science in early 1900s:

  • Space flight is not possible because there is nothing in space for an engine to push against.
  • Since space cannot be empty, there needs to be a substance and name it ether.
  • The Universe cannot be infinite, so we live in an  ‘island universe’ that we call the Milky Way.  

Settled Science later in the 20th century

  • There are so many safeguards built into nuclear power plants that the odds of an accident are 50,000,000,000 to 1.
  • A ‘population bomb’ would wipe out millions or billion of humans before the end of the century.
  • An impending Ice Age would settle upon Northern climes before the end of the century with great death and destruction in its wake.
  • Being gay or lesbian was classified as abnormal and a psychiatric condition by the experts in the field.

Settled Science early in the 21th century

  • That nothing can exceed the speed of light was a given until it was recently ‘proven’ that the Inflationary Stage of the first moments of the Big Bang expanded thousands or millions of light-years in less than a millionth of a second.

With Occam’s Razor in mind we must come to the conclusion that ‘settled science’ is a term that often contradicts the Scientific Method, itself and,therefore, must be used with great caution.

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: Obama the Intellectual

What Nicholas Kristof said about Global Language Monitor in his analysis of Obama the Intellectual.

 
Kristof 1

Kristof 2
Kristof 3

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The ThoughtTopper Institute: The Global Economic Restructuring

What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

 This post first appeared on The Hill

November 3, 2010.  It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that  inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

 

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ThoughtTopper Institute: Re-naming the Great Recession

A Retrospective on the Great Recession that Began Ten Years Ago This Month

 

AUSTIN, Texas,  August 9, 2011.  Words have power. Names have power.   Three years ago we spoke to Newsweek about what should the then-current/still-current economic crisis be named. The ‘Great Recession’ was favored by the New York Times and eventually ‘certified’ by the AP Style Guide.  The Global Language Monitor’s position was that the economic crisis of 2008 did not resemble a recession, as we had come to define recessions, and the resemblance to the Worldwide Economic Depression of the 1930s was tentative, at best.

GLM’s position was that we were experiencing was not a recession, neither great nor small, but something of a wholly differing sort:  a Global Economic Restructuring.

Words have power. Names have power. In fact words and names can shape the contours of a debate. And, we might add, words and names carry the inherent capacity to lead us astray. Casting the current reality in the terms of those crises we’ve already experienced, provides the comfort (and illusion) that things are well in control.

It is about time that we admit that what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words “by other means”.

Globe Naming the Great Recession

Originally alluded to as a “Financial Tsunami” or “Financial Meltdown,” the major global media seem to have gained a consensus on “The Great Recession”. In the beginning, most comparisons were being made to the Great Economic Depression of the 1930s, more familiarly known, simply, as “The Depression” in the same way that many still refer to World War II as “The War”. But even these comparisons frequently ended up referring to the recession of 1982, yet another so-called “Great Recession”.

Our recent analysis has shown that while the major print and electronic media have settled upon “Great Recession”, the rest of the Internet, blogosphere and social media world have largely eschewed the term. We believe the difficulty here stems from the fact that this economic crisis is difficult to express in words because it does not resemble any economic crisis in recent memory — but rather a crisis of another sort.

“On War” is one of the most influential books on military strategy of all time. Written by Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz (1780 – 1831), it recorded one of his most respected tenets, “War is not merely a political act, but also a real political instrument, a continuation of political commerce, a carrying out of the same by other means,” which is frequently abbreviated to “War is diplomacy carried out by other means’.

We believe that the reason the “Great Recession” label does not now fit, as has now become obvious, because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

This fact has entrapped two U.S. presidents, from radically diverging political viewpoints, in the same dilemma: describing an economic phenomenon, that doesn’t play by the old rules. Hence, the difficulty experienced by President Bush as he struggled to describe how the U.S. economy was not in a recession since the GDP had not declined for two consecutive quarters, the traditional definition of a recession, even though jobs were being shed by the millions and the global banking system teetered on the brink of collapse. Now we have President Obama, attempting to describe how the U.S. economy has emerged out of a recession, though the collateral damage in terms of the evaporation of wealth, mortgages, and jobs remains apparently undaunted and unabated.

And the world, from China to Germany, stands aghast as we continue to argue, in spite of all available evidence that debt is a good thing. “We all say so, so it must be true!” seems to be the all-too-familiar refrain from Washington.

The regional or global transfer of wealth, power and influence, the destruction of entire industries and the so-called collateral (or human) damage are all hallmarks of what is now being experienced in the West.

If one carefully disassembles the events of the last decade or two, you can see them as the almost inevitable conclusion of a nameless war that began with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the embrace of a form of the free-market system by China, India and the other rising states, an almost unprecedented transfer of wealth from the Western Economies to the Middle East (energy) and South and East Asia (manufactured goods and services), and the substantial transfer of political power and influence that inevitably follows.

It currently appears that the Western Powers most affected by these transfers cannot adequately explain, or even understand, their present circumstances in a way that makes sense to the citizenry, let alone actually reverse (or even impede) the course of history. In fact, the larger events are playing out while the affected societies seemingly default to the hope that they ultimately can exert some sort of control over a reality that appears to be both out of their grasp and control.

The good news here is that the transfers of wealth, power and influence has proven relatively bloodless but nonetheless destructive for the hundreds of millions of those on the front lines of the economic dislocations.

And it is in this context that the perceived resentment of the Islamic and Arab states should be more clearly viewed. This is especially so as they, too, watch helplessly as the new global reality and re-alignments unfold.

In conclusion, it can be argued that the reason the “Great Recession” label doesn’t seem to fit now is because what we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather an on-going transformational event involving the global transfer of wealth, power and influence on an unprecedented level, carried out “by other means”.

By Paul JJ Payack and Edward ML Peters.  Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

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ThoughtTopper Institute: An American ‘Lost Decade’

“What we are experiencing is not a recession, neither great nor small, but rather a global transference of wealth, power and prestige on an unprecedented level, carried out, in von Clausewitz’s words ‘by other means’.”

November 30, 2010.  Where do we go from here?  We’ve already established that this is not a typical business cycle and this recession falls out of scope of previous recessions. Even the Great Depression was typical in the sense that it set off a worldwide fall in demand and productivity. It is now widely understood that while government intervention did stop the catastrophic collapse of the global economy, this intervention did little to revitalize global economic growth which did not resume until the onset of World War II.

This post first appeared on The Hill, the newspaper for Capitol Hill

Now, fast forward to September 2008 and months following shortly thereafter. There is wide agreement that the direct and dramatic Bush/Obama interventions did, indeed, prevent a global economic collapse. However, for many nations, including the U.S., the revitalization has yet to occur. While the stimulus spending saved many jobs in the public sector, few jobs were created in the private or wealth-creating sector. In retrospect it now appears that the stimulus was the equivalent to eating empty calories when hungry; a temporary rise in blood sugar without sustained nutrition.

This lack of wealth-building focus has led to a weak economic performance of 2.4 percent projected growth in GDP, hardly what one expects after such spending. (This growth rate has already been revised downward to 1.6 percent in the last quarter.) If this scenario does play out as expected, the eight million lost jobs will be replaced with new ones — by the 2020 time frame. By way of comparison, the “Reagan Recovery” created over 11,000,000 new jobs with four years.

While President Obama’s economic policies and overall execution of leadership is the current focus of many commentators, it remains a fact that this situation didn’t sneak up on us. The United States manufacturing sector has declined as a percentage of non-farm employment from about 30 percent in 1950 to just 9.27 percent in 2010, according to the October estimate of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Also, an underlying statistic is that the U.S. has been losing not just manufacturing jobs, but entire factories, over 40,000 of them since 2000. The ramifications here go far beyond the manufacturing sector itself. Indeed, by some estimates, there is a 15-1 multiplier between other jobs (including manufacturing and service) and each manufacturing position. Therefore, this unprecedented loss of an industrial base and its concomitant plethora of supporting positions leave a greatly reduced platform upon which to launch a successful and timely recovery.

And so the question remains: Where do we go from here?

First, take a deep breath, look in the mirror and repeat; the world is different from what it was in 1982 and wishing and acting like it was the same will not bring those lost manufacturing jobs back. No matter what we do, trying to recapture global leadership in industries where the average U.S. salary (excluding benefits) is over $20/hr where the similar cost in China or Mexico is between $2-$6/hr is a losing proposition. This is not to say that the U.S. should not continue to innovate and look to manufacture world-class products, only that we will have to pick our battles in places where we have a strategic competence and a willingness to compete. Specifically, management must be willing to continually analyze each process for best in class behaviors and continually work to improve in order to maintain a leadership position.

Second, focus strategic investment in industries where the U.S. has a substantial lead or could develop one in future. Good examples here are in the area of information technology, where private investment continues to create new enterprises and wealth and “green technology” whose future is yet to unfold. We need to remind ourselves of the effectiveness of the U.S. Space Program, not only in accomplishing its primary mission, but creating entire industries and market that are still returning value to this day.

Third, fully accept that the old manufacturing jobs will not be repatriated and implement a program that will both create true value for the economy while putting people back to work. In past recessions, workers were typically called back to their jobs as the economy improved. This time however, with the loss of so many factories, the jobs platform is significantly smaller and is unable to support the type of recovery we have seen in the past. Now, we must both create jobs in new markets and industries as well as find employment for those whose skill base will not readily transfer to the new jobs platform(s).

A good example of this is the proposal by the Center for American Progress that outlines a plan to develop an energy efficiency industry to retrofit approximately 40 percent of the country’s buildings (approximately 50 million structures) within the next decade. This would require more than $500 billion in public and private investment and create over 600,000 “sustainable” jobs. Under the plan, energy use in those buildings would be reduced up to 40 percent and generate between $32 billion and $64 billion in annual consumer savings. Those savings would be used to re-pay the construction loans that would support the program.

This type of program would both create private sector jobs and help re-build U.S. infrastructure for the next five decades, all the while creating a buffer between the current economic environment and the one that will emerge.

One word of caution: we need a dozen or more initiatives of this kind to even come close to replacing the 8,000,000 lost jobs.

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor. Edward ML Peters is CEO of Dallas-based OpenConnect Systems. Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

 

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Politics 2016: Fighting the Last War, Again

Vietnam 2
It used to be said, that old soldiers are always fighting the last war.  That they are trained in the techniques and strategies that were acquired on battlefields past, and the old lessons don’t always apply to the current fields of battle.  In 2016, this lesson does not apply to the American Military who deal in contingencies of every imaginable stripe, but rather to the political class who seem to be impervious to the will (and pulse) of the American electorate.
Rather than trying to harness the anger beneath the surface, the political elite is attempting to ignore that which is in plain sight to in order to keep the control they have exerted over the electorate.




On the Republican side, senior leadership is arguing amongst themselves about how to stop Trump, the unannointed usurper.

On the Democratic side, there is some comfort in the fact that the party’s unelected, non-represetative ‘Super Delagates’ can direct the vote to whom they please, in a new (and ingenious) kind of voter suppression

While arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Syrian Civil War becomes ever more ominous,, which now has resulted in more than a quarter of a million civilizian deaths while ex-patriating millions of rufugees to an EU, which can’t keep up with the continuing inflow.
And, again, while arguing over who voted to authorize the Iraq War, the Islamic State (ISIL or ISIS) captures huge swaths of Iraqi land, and an ever enlarging footprint in the Middle East (and now North Africa), and declares the existence a new Caliphate, which by tradition, all Muslims are ordered to support.
The same can be said for our political leadership in the current election cycle where the political reality in 2016 is in direct conflict with the will of their own people.

Not a day goes by without any number of screeching headlines referring to the Republican or Democratic leadership as well as the elite opinion makers attempting to stop the current political ‘revolutions’ and return to the more managable election landscape of elections past.




While Democratic and Republican Party leadership are busy fighting the last war (or eve worse the last several wars), the American electorate has been busy moving forward with eyes squarely on the current battle, writing headlines of their own.

Somehow it appears as if enough Americans have had their fill of the status quo — and are moving onto the new fields of battle, daring to lead the elites into a hazy, ill-defined political future.

Examples of Fighting the Last War:

  • Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders – OK, so they might actually win their party’s nominations.   Obviously, this is a result of a series of major mis-judgements of Party Leadership of both parties.  Stop managing expectations and start managing reality.
  • Deaths by Opioids — Every year, there are now as many deaths from Opioids in the US as deaths from guns.  And this is affecting all demographics.  Where is the outcry!?
  • The 1% — No matter how you define the elite, the facts remain that an ever larger percentage of the nation’s wealth is flowing to those at the top.  And it is all too obvious that the banks that are ‘too large to fail’ are also ‘too large for jail’.
  • Middle East — Problems in the Middle East do not spring from George W. Bush, but rather from the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) and the creation of boundaries of convenience for the British Protectorate.  Fighting the Last War (Iraq 2003) here has led to the ongoing struggles in Iraq, the deaths of hundreds of thousands in Syria, and the spread of the Islamic State.
  • Manufacturing Jobs — The focus on ‘bringing back’ lost manufacturing jobs — In numbers employed, the Service Sector topped the Manufacturing Sector in the 1970s.  Since World War II the Manufacturing Sector has declined from about a quarter of total in percentage of total employment to just below 10% currently.  Fortunately, the sector’s productivity has exploded and the US still produces about 20% of the world’s manufacturing output.  But those millions of jobs (including three or four million shipped to China since the turn of the century) are not coming back.
  • Unemployment Under 5% — All Americans are quite aware that the employment number is not right. Does it include those who’ve given up looking for work? No.  Is the largest prison population in the world included in the number? No.  We all know those who are working two (or more) jobs to maintain their previous standards of living.  Are the underemployed counted the same as the ‘fully employed’?  Yes.
  • Focus on Identity politics — There is ample evidence that the younger population is not as focused on ‘identity politics’ as do the party’s elite. The current electorate focuses less on ‘race’ and identity politics, and more on the reality of income inequality, as well as disparities in opportunities, educational attainment, and employment.




Conclusion:

What is sure: the current electorate is delivering a resounding No Vote, a stunning vote of No Confidence to the current leadership of both parties.  A good portion of the American public has decided that they are tired of past and present policy initiatives, and the ever smaller focus on slights delivered to each other each, than their concerns with a world teeming with war, terrorism, and economic inequality.

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Brief Sartorial Overview of the White House

 
White House Planes 3
White House Plans 2
White House Plans
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sartorial choices of the residents of the White House have long been setting the tongues of both the press and scalawags awaggin’, since before the White House (nee the President’s Palace), was even constructed.President Washington set the tone for those to follow with his commanding presence, even in civilian clothes.
 
Along the way, the White House has had its share of Southern Patricians, Backwoods Men, Log-Splitters, Military Commanders, haberdashers, and a true dandy or two.
 
Background
 
Sartorial choices of the residents of the White House have long been setting the tongues of both the press and scalawags a waggin’, well before the White House (nee the President’s Palace), was even constructed.
 
 
George Washington
 
George Washington at 40
George Washington at Forty
George Washington in Civilian Clothes
George Washington as Civilian
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
President Washington set the tone for many to follow as he continued with his commanding presence, even in civilian clothes.
 
 
Andrew Jackson
 
The Backwoods Man Who   Became a Fashionable President
The Backwoods Man Who Became a Fashionable President

Andrew Jackson, the first ‘common man’ to win the presidency, had a six hundred pound block of cheese in the White House,  for his fringe-wearing followers to devour.

 

Martin Van Buren

Martin Van Buren Preidential Style 2
Martin Van Buren Preidential Style 3
Martin Van Buren Preidential Style

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Martin Van Buren, of Dutch descent, was known as an ‘meticulous’ dresser’, though the Democrats of the time whom he helped organize, were more like to wear frontiersmen chic.  Perhaps, his greatest accomplishment was to help popularized the newly emergent word “O.K.” with his campaign slogan, “Old Kinderhook is OK”.

Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln as a young lawyer
Lincoln as a young lawyer
Abraham_Lincoln Style 2
Lincoln Takes the Advice of a Young Girl and Grows a Beard
Abraham Lincoln in Top Hat
Lincoln Was a Formidible Presence in the Field and at Home

 

 

Abraham Lincoln was a transformative president who was able to transform his backwoods, rail-splitter image, by growing  a most-fashionable beard (at the sugesstion of a young girl) and donning his iconic top hat (which he used to carry papers and

 

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Fashion 1
Edith Wilson presidential Fashion

 


 

Woodrow Wilson kept us out of war, then got us into War, then had a stroke during which time his wife, Edith, effectively ran the government (for the last 2  1/2 years of his term).

His fashion look of: Pick One

  1. A minister’s son
  2. A college president
  3. A striken Man

Correct Answer:  All Three.

 

The Two Roosevelts,  T.R. and Franklin Delano

FDR President Style 3
TR Presidential 1

 

 

The two Roosevelts,  T.R. and Franklin Delano, were distant cousins born a a generation apart — set disparate style paradigms with the former as a rough riding, San Juan Hill charging, Yosemite climbing, friend of John Muir naturalist  — and the latter, FDR, though striken at an early age with polio, provided a dashing, impeccably dressed figure leading the nation through the depths of the Depression and the darkest days of World War II.

 

Harry S Truman

Truman Presidential Fashion 5
Truman Presidential Fashion 6
Truman Presidential Fashion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry S Truman, a haberdasher, who was born without a middle initial, was destined to fill the shoes of a towering predecessor. First treated as an  accident of history, this always stylish president went on to push the button of the first atomic bomb, helped create the key institutions of the post World War II world — the United Nations, NATO, the re-building of Europe and Japan, among many, others.

 

 

Dwight D. Eisenhowser

Ike Jacket Presidential fashion 3

 

Ike Jacket Presidential fashion 2
Ike Jacket Presidential fashion

 


 

 

 

Of course, people liked Ike, a matinee-handsome conquering hero, who designed his own jacket, the “Eisenhowser Jacket” which became standard issue for the entire army — and a fashion inspiration.

 

 

John F. Kennedy

 

Kennedy Proved the Victor Over Nixon -- on Style Points
Kennedy Proved the Victor Over Nixon — on Style Points

Few of a certain age will ever forget Richard Nixon apparently sweating both the big and the small stuff in the 1960 television debate with a younger, better tailored, blue-shirt wearing, JFK sans 5:00 o’clock shadow.

JFK Fashion

And, of course there was perhaps his greatest asset, one Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who set a class of style all her own.

Jacqueline Kennedy

 

 

James Earl Carter

 

Jimmy Carter Preidential Style 2
Jimmy Carter Preidential Style 3
Jimmy Carter Preidential Style

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then there was the Peanut Farmer of Plains, Georgia, Jimmy Carter, who made his grey cardigan a familiar, yet annoying, White House sight.

 

 

 

Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan presidential fashion 2
Ronald Reagan presidential fashion 1
Ronald Reagan presidential fashion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald Reagan appeared as an aging former movie star and kept up appearances, even when clearing brush, as he was won’t to do on his Santa Barbara-area ranch.

 

George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush


Bush Both Prsidential Fashion 2

 

 

Bush Both Prsidential Fashion 4
Bush Both Prsidential Fashion

 

Bush 41 and Bush 43 dressed in Corporate American fashion — the former dressed a member of the Board with the latter dressed for success as a preppy-ish MBA-toting, Chief Marketing Officer.

 

 

Bill Clinton

 

Bill Clinton Presidential Style Sax 3
Bill Clinton Presidential Style
Bill Clinton Jogging  Presidential Style 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Clinton continues to be known for his folksy aspect, his erstwhile jogging shorts, and lots of denim (even without a ranch for backdrop).

 

 

Barack Obama 

Barack Obama Presidential Style 2
Mobama presidential Fashion
Barack Obama Presidential Style

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Obama is well-loved as a dad, and for his Dad j\Jeans, but it is Mrs. Obama who has stolen the show, including Mobama nailing two Vogue covers and several appearances in the top fashion buzzwords of the year.

 

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