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Martin van Buren

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1,025,109.8 (January 1, 2014 estimate)

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‘Climate Change’ tops Earth Day Words that Changed the World

Since 1970 a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language.  

New Words and New ‘Senses’ of Old Words

Austin, Texas, Earth Week, April 2014 —  Climate Change has topped the Global Language Monitor’s Earth Day Words that Changed the World analysis.  Climate Change outpaced Sustainable and Global Warming in the third annual analysis of Global English.  

Since the first Earth Day was celebrated as an ‘environmental teach-in’ on April 22, 1970 a whole new vocabulary has entered the English Language.   The Global Language Monitor has determined the top new words and new ‘senses’ of old words that have been engendered  since that first Earth Day in 1970.  The words are ranked by order of present-day usage in the English-speaking world.  The study was updated the second week of April 2014.

“As the term ‘Climate Change’ suggests, the issues that the first Earth Day helped bring to the fore have had an evermore profound effect on global culture  – and the English language,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “The issues these words represent are now viewed as essential to human progress, and even survival.

The words analyzed are but the most profound examples of a movement that has been gaining momentum at least since the 1960s.

GLM used their Narrative Tracker methodologies to determine and rank the Earth Day words.  The criteria included determining which words have had an impact on the environmental movement and/or were influential in its growth.  

The Top Words Engendered by Earth Day and the Environmental Movement since 1970 are listed below.

Rank/Word/Last Year’s Rank/Definition    

1.  Climate change (4) — Now used twice as much as the term ‘global warming’.  Originally favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily dues to long-term atmospheric cycles.

2. Sustainable (3) — The ability to create self-replicating systems that can persist over time.  Sustainable was GLM’s word of the year in 2006.Green (1) — Practices that are in harmony with the environment.

3. Global warming (11) — Favored by those who think the warming of the planet is primarily due to human influence.  (Compare Climate  Change, above).

4. Eco- (as a prefix) (5) — Shorthand for ‘ecological’; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).  

5.  Vegan (9) — Those who abstain from eating animal or dairy products, often avoiding any products made from animals (such as leather or gelatin); coined in 1944 in the UK by Donald Watson. 

6.  Ecology (7) — the relations of beings to each other and their environment; from the Greek ‘oikos’ for house (or table).  

7.  Recycle (8) — The re-using of materials once viewed as waste.  

8.  Hybrid (car) (22) – Cars that use a mixture of technologies to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels.  

9.  Locavore (10) — Thinking globally while eating locally.

10. Emissions (6) —  In this sense, gases and particles sent out into the atmosphere through industrial production, automobiles, etc.; from the Late Latin emittere, to send out of.  

11. Xeriscape (14) — Literally ‘dry landscaping’; using natural elements in a desert landscape for yard enhancement.   Begging the question:  must every yard resemble an English Manor?

12.  Natural (food) (21) – Food grown with without artificial ingredients (such as color)  and produced in a manner similar to that used in a well-stocked home kitchen.

13.  Renewable energy (2) — Energy derived from solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and similar ‘sustainable’ sources.

14.  Organic food (18) — Food grown or produced without synthetic fertilizers, insecticides, hormones, irradiation and genetic modification.  

15.  Carbon footprint (19) — The total amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions generate by a human activity.  Driving a late-model, fuel-efficient car emits about 6 pounds of CO2 every ten miles.  Term first used in 1980.   Alternative definition – Your life reduced to the a series of equations on energy (carbon) consumption.

16.  Biodegradable (15) — Organic material that decays naturally in a relatively short time.

17. Greenhouse gas (GHG) (16) — Any gas emitted into the atmosphere that trap heat (e.g., CO2); without them the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans; with an excess the Earth would be uninhabitable for humans.18. Solar power (12) — Energy derived by harnessing the sun’s electromagnetic radiation.

19. Post-consumer (waste) (20) — Material that can be used as a resource to build new products.

20. Emissions (6) — In this sense, gases and particles sent out into the atmosphere through industrial production, automobiles, etc.; from the Late Latin emittere, to send out of.

21.  Greenwash (25) — Highlighting aspects of a product that may or appear to be favorable to the environment in order to re-shape its brand image.

22.  Biomass (13) — Material derived from plants that can be used as a renewable energy source.

23.  Biofuels (24) — Finally, we are reaching a break-even point with sugar based biofuels in Brazil.

24.  Greenhouse Effect (23) — The heating of the Earth’s surface in a fashion similar to a greenhouse, with GHG acting as glass windows that trap heat.  The result of the increased emission of CO2 and other GHGs.

25.  Carbon trading (26) — Trading, in effect, the rights to pollute between different manufacturers in the global marketplace.

26.   Free-range (27) — The animal has been raised with access to the outside; not the same as ‘free roaming’.

27.  Save a Tree! (28) – One of the first rallying cries of the Environmental Movement.  Unfortunately, replacing a renewable resource with one made of petroleum created ecological problems of its own. 

For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor collected data from the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media as they emerge.  

 About Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. In 2003, GLM first coined the term ‘ephemeral data’ as an attribute of ever-expanding Big Data. GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words of 2014

 

Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words of 2014

 

Current Number of Words in the English Language is 1,025,109.8. (January 1, 2014 estimate)

 

AUSTIN, Texas April 16, 2014 –    Emoji, Futebol, and Ghost Plane lead the Top Trending Words and Phrases of 2014, according to the current word trends in global English being tracked by the Global Language Monitor.   This is a preliminary to GLM’s twelfth annual Word of the Year rankings that will be released at year-end.


Emoji Color

“Not only is the English language adding a new word every 98 minutes, but it is also expanding the basis of word creation. The alphabet, itself, is now expanding beyond letters to numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words),” said Paul JJ Payack, chief word analyst, the Global Language Monitor.

The Top Trending Words of 2014 are listed below  (Rank, Word, and Comment). 

  1. Emoji — Smilies beware!  The Emojis are now here.  In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet:  Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words).
  2. Futebol — Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer is hurtling toward Brasil
  3. Climate Change —  Two interesting points to add to the debate: 1) The Earth is now approaching the temps of the Medieval Warm Period circa 1100 c.e., and 2) 8,000 years ago oceans were some 100 meters lower than present level.
  4. Ghost Plane — Malaysian Flight 360, now has echoes of the 17th c. ‘ghost ship’, the ‘Flying Dutchman’.
  5. Inflation — OK, so the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact.  Way Cool.
  6. Denier — An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended).
  7. Mid-Term Elections — The Perpetual Campaign of the US rolls into 2014, a mere speedbump on the way to ’16.
  8. Crimea — Remember,  Charge of the Light Brigade though highly celebrated, was an unmitigated disaster.
  9. Pontiff — Francis keeps upending convention and papal protocol.
  10. Conscious De-Coupling — Oh Gwyneth Paltrow, what hath thou wrought to the language?
  11. Quinquennium — Or lustrum (either way five-year periods) — preparing for decade-and-a-half terminology as 2015 looms.
  12. The Great War — The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c.
  13. Blood Moon — Four total eclipses of the Moon in an 18-month span.  Not yet referred to as the  Lunar-aplyspe — but the year is young.
  14. V. V. Putin — Proving to no longer be a Pootie-Poot (etymology unknown), the nickname of George W. Bush bestowed on him.
  15. Chinese —  All things  Chinese are (still) on the rise  Western Powers should be acclimated to this by now.

In November, 2013, Austin, Texas-based GLM announced that the Internet error code ’404′ was the Top Word of the Year of 2013.

To see the Top Words of 2013, go here.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate).GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  In 2003, GLM first coined the term ‘ephemeral data’ as an attribute of ever-expanding Big Data. GLM  has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the blogosphere, social media as well as the top print and electronic media sites.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

British Open widens lead over the Masters as Golf’s Top Major

Third Annual Ranking of Tournament Brand Equity

The BAI helps determine the value of an event

In Analysis ‘The Players’ Ranks higher than the PGA, Again

Tour Championship by Coca-Cola Registers Less than 1% of Internet MediaBuzz

 

Austin, Texas. the Masters Weekend, April 2014 — The Open Championship has widened it lead over the Masters as the Top Golf Major in the Global Language Monitor’s third annual ranking.

Golf Majors 2014

The analysis compared the strength of affiliation of each of the currently recognized events (The Masters, The US Open, The Open Championship or British Open and the PGA Championship) to the concept of ‘major championship’.  GLM then added the Players Championship and the end-of-the-season Tour Championship for comparison with the four recognized events.  The Players Championship has solidified its position as the ‘Stealth Major’ again placing third in the ranking, ahead of the PGA Championship.  To judge the impact of  the Tour Championship, GLM put it into the mix but later eliminated it for consideration after it did not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion.

Read More on a Comparison of the Careers of Tiger Woods and Mickey Mantle

When compared to the 2013 analysis, the Open Championship gained some 40 points, the Masters and US Open remained strong at last year’s levels , while both the Players and PGA Championships finished with lower BAI scores.  In 2013 the PGA finished about ten points behind the Players, while in 2014 the PGA lagged behind by about twenty points as measured by the BAI.

The BAI is an important metric to advertisers and sponsors since it helps determine the value of an event.

Golf Majors 2014 Change

 

Of course, by elevating the Players to Major Status, Jack Nicklaus would add three Major victories to his total (to 21), while Tiger Woods would add only one (to 15).

“Since 1860 The Open is the championship against which all future Majors would be judged.  Now over one hundred and fifty-years later, we see that it is strengthening both its reputation and significance,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.  Furthermore, it actually moved forward to a commanding lead in the ranking of Golf’s Major Championship.  In spite of its elite field and generous purse, the end-of-season Tour Championship did not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion.”

 

History

In the early to mid 20th century, the Majors were considered to be those tournaments won by Bobby Jones during his historic 1930 season:  the US and British Amateurs, the Open Championship and the US Open. Later Jones’ own tournament, the Masters, gained in importance as did the Western Open (considered a Major by many for a number of decades) as the British PGA fell from favor.  As recently as 1960 there was no official recognition of the Majors, as such.

Methodology

GLM ranks Golf’s Major Championships by Internet Media Buzz.  For this analysis, GLM employed its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index.  The BAI computes and details the relative brand equity of people, products or events based on the analysis of global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate assessment at any point in time. To do so, GLM analyzes the billions of pages on the Internet, millions of blogs, the top 300,000 global print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources, as they emerge.

About Global Language Monitor:  ”How will the Global Trends Impact Your World?”
Founded in Silicon Valley, Austin, Texas-based GLM collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call +1.512.815.8836 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

A commentary on Tiger Woods (and Mickey Mantle) by Paul JJ Payack, the Global Language Monitor, Austin, Texas

April 2014

For some time now I have been pondering the apparent decline of Tiger Woods.

Over his long career he’s been cut and measured against those of Jack, Arnie, and Sam (sometimes Phil) and, now, Rory, Bubba, and the other Young Guns.

But the comparison to which I keep coming back never played out on the links, or  Amen Corner, or even on the hallowed grounds of St. Andrews or Pebble Beach, but on the barren ball fields of Commerce, Oklahoma and  later on a particularly verdant patch of grass off the Major Deegan Expressway in the Bronx.  Of course I am not writing of one of Tiger’s fellow golfers at all, but rather  of The Mick, one Mickey Charles Mantle, of New York Yankees fame.

Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)
Annals of Heroes Past (and passing)

Both Tiger and Mickey achieved greatness at an early age, to herald the beginnings of long, illustrious careers — and both were destined for that type of glory, perhaps, never (or at least seldom seen) before.  Both had peak performances a dozen or so years into their career, then they both continued  showing flashes of brilliance, amidst the strongest of suspicions that their careers had peaked in their 32nd years. If their past were prologues — then their prologues had, indeed, passed.

I watched Mickey stumbling through those last painful years, tuning to the game every 20 minutes or so, to catch him lumbering from the batter’s box toward the plate, hoping against hope that he’d collect those few hits that would preserve a career .300 batting average, the last mark of greatness he had left to achieve.

Even then, I had done the math.  If only he could finish this last season with eight more hits than his then-current pace he’d achieve his final, career capping goal, then vanishing before his eyes (and mine).

In that context, I have been watching, studying Tiger, since what might now be considered his consummate effort, playing virtually if not literally on one leg, gutting out one last brilliant effort high above the surf at Torrey Pines.

This is not to say that Tiger will never pass Jack in his long-sought goal, the grail of capturing his Nineteenth Major.  But the story, like that of The Mick, has taken on many of the trappings of a neo-Greek tragedy.

He, like Mickey, heroes from afar, reach for (and attain) heroic status, they each evince their individual brands of hubris, exhibit an achilles heel (or two),  engage in mortal combat with a cast of rivals nearly god-like heroes themselves.

For The Mick there was no Deus ex-Machina to intervene in the final act; for Tiger, the Chorus has yet to sing.

 

OK: 175 years old and going strong

Most Recognized Word on the Planet:  OK or O.K. or Okay

March 23, 2014.  This week is the 175th anniversary of one of the great moments in the English Language:  the old Boston Post newspaper printing the phrase ‘oll korrect’, in a bit of humorous wordplay back in 1839.

Earlier this afternoon, we performed a simple Google search for the word; the search returned some 1,200,000,000 references to OK.   Not bad for a word no one is quite sure how to spell.

OK is now widely heard wherever one sets foot on the planet.

U.S. President Martin Van Buren (A.D. 1837–1841) was born in Old Kinderhook, New York. His nickname, Old Kinderhook, was incorporated into his re-election campaign slogan in 1840 (“Old Kinderhook is O.K.”).  O.K. Democratic Clubs sprung up around the young nation. Van Buren was a founding member of the Democratic Party. (He was overwhelmingly defeated by the Whigs in his re-election attempt.)

Alternative derivations, since disproven, suggested that OK was from the Greek phrase ola kala for ‘all is well’ used in the shipping industry. Another, actually favored by president Woodrow Wilson, was that OK was derived from the Native American language of the Choctaw ‘okeh’.

However, what is well-documented is that the U.S. Presidential Election of 1840 catalyzed OK’s already growing usage and subsequent global expansion during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  After World War II, US hegemony cemented its global propagation.

As English became the world’s first, true global language with some 1.83 billion speakers, dominance of the software of the Microsoft Corporation further embedded it everyday use on the Internet.  Some 80% of its computer programs that are ‘localized’ into native languages use the English word OK to assert completion or assent.

For good measure, the successful completion of a server response on the World Wide Web (of which there are billions every second) is defined as OK.

Now with the proliferation of social media, the word itself has further evolved with its shortening to the single letter, k.

OK?




The ‘f-word’ is (unfortunately) the Top Hollyword of 2013

The ‘f-word’ is (unfortunately) the  Top Hollyword of 2013

The Year in Film as Reflected in the English Language

11th Annual Global Survey by the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas, March 11, 2013.   The word euphemistically described as the ‘f-word‘ has been named the  Top Hollyword of the 2013 season by the Global Language Monitor, in its eleventh annual survey. Gravity came in second followed by slavery, minion, and operating system (OS).  Rounding out the Top Ten were melancholia, secret identity, Lone Star, ‘sense of place’, and recurrence.   Each year, GLM announces the words after the Oscars at the conclusion of the awards season. The 86th Annual Academy Awards ceremony was held at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, CA, Sunday, March 2, 2014.  Ellen Degeneres was the host for the second time.

“The word euphemistically described as the ‘f-word’ is our Top Hollyword of the Year.  The seemingly all-persuasive word can be found in all major Western Cinema, evidenced by the majority of this year’s Best Picture Nominees.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor.  ”Though the word was first introduced onto the screen in an apparent effort to shock the audience, the word is now used for various parts of speech with several dozen differing senses (or definitions).  In literature, the word was identified in the mid-1600s peaking in the 1730s. The word then re-emerged in the 1960s and its use has increased exponentially ever since.”

The Oscars also introduced a new class of Ambush Marketing (Inverse-ambush Marketing), where the sponsor ambushes the audience.  In this case Samsung paid a reported $20 million fee for product placement during the live broadcast, when Ellen used  a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 for the ‘spontaneous’ selfie of the star-studded audience was re-tweeted some 871,000 times within an hour.

The Top Hollywords of the 2013 season with commentary follow.

Rank / Word or Phrase / Commentary

  1. The F-Word (Wolf of Wall Street, American Hustle, etc.) — Not an endorsement but can’t ignore the preponderance of the word in contemporary film-making. Historically it was first used extensively in the late 1600s and was revived in the early 1960s.
  2. Gravity (Gravity) — Unarticulated protagonist of the film defined: Any two bodies in the universe attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.  Just sayin’.
  3. Slavery (12 Years a Slave) — There are said to be more slaves in the 21st c. than anytime in history.   Many conjecture what they would have done during the earlier periods of human trafficking.  They have the same opportunity today for that time is now.
  4. Minion (Despicable Me 2) — Literally, a servile follower or inferior.  Not the aspiration of any B-School grad but much more humorous.
  5. Operating System (Her) — Breaking new ground here; not an Operating System as a protagonist (that would be 2001: a Space Odyssey’s HAL), but, rather, the first OS as a romantic lead.
  6. Melancholia (Blue Jasmine) — Kate Blanchett’s masterful rendition of what the Ancient’s considered  a preponderance of  ’black bile’:  melancholia.
  7. Secret Identity (Hunger Games) – Plutarch Heavensbee’s secret identity was to the benefit of millions in the Hunger Games; in real life the secret identity of Philip Seymour Hoffman led to his untimely death.
  8. ‘Lone Star’ (Dallas Buyers Club) —  Like Mr. McConaughey, all things Texas (to admire or disparage), the Lone Star State are hot.
  9. Sense of Place (American Hustle, Nebraska, August (Osage County) – The world may be ‘flat’ but the sense of place appears to getting stronger in film.
  10. Recurrence (About Time) — An equation that defines a sequence recursively; e.g., something occurring again and again, and so on.  An old screen formula, applied gently and lovingly here.

Previous Top Hollyword Winners include:

  • 2012  ’Emancipation — (Lincoln, Django, Argo) — Webster says ‘to free from restraint, control, or the power of another’.
  • 2011  ’Silence’ – Silent movies, (the Artist), a wife’s silence (Descendants), a father’s silence (Extremely Loud), silence among the trenches of WWI (Warhorse).
  • 2010  ’Grit’ — firmness, pluck, gritty, stubborn, indomitable spirit, courageous, and brave perseverance.
  • 2009  ‘Pandora’ —  from Avatar
  • 2008  ’Jai Ho!” —  Literally ‘Let there be Victory’ in Hindi from Slumdog Millionaire
  • 2007  “Call it, Friendo” —  from No Country for Old Men
  • 2006  “High Five!!! It’s sexy time!”  – from Borat!
  • 2005  ‘Brokeback’ — from Brokeback Mountain
  • 2004 ‘Pinot’ — from Sideways
  • 2003 ‘Wardrobe malfunction’ — Justin Timberlake and Janet Jackson from Super Bowl XXXVIII

 

Methodology.  Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge. The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known. GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.


Ambush Marketing (and Marketing) Awards for the Sochi Winter Games Announced

 ”Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available; order here.

Olympic Wrap-up, March 2014 Austin, Texas — The Global Language Monitor announced that Red Bull has taken the Gold for the Top Ambush Marketing Campaign, while Proctor & Gamble out-dueled a resurgent Samsung to take the Gold for the Top Marketing Campaign by an Official Sponsor for the recently concluded XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia.   For the Ambushers, Red Bull led comfortably over Subway, which took the Silver, and Rolex, a surprise winner of the Bronze;  Rolex was in a very tight race with both Unilever and Siemens.  The complete “Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available for download order here.

Following P&G for the Official Sponsors were Samsung taking the Silver, and Coca-Cola hauling in the Bronze.   P&G, Samsung and Coca-Cola all had critically acclaimed marketing campaigns that were well-received by global audiences.

The awards are determined by Global Language Monitor’s (GLM) Brand Affiliation Index (BAI),  a proprietary, longitudinal study that analyzes the global association between (and among) individual brands and their competitors or, in this case, the Sochi Winter Games.  In the study, The Global Language Monitor measured several dozen factors, closely examining all marketing movement extending from London 2012 to projections for the Rio 2016.  GLM has been tracking the Olympics in this manner  since the Beijing Summer Games.

200px-Dionysos_mask_Louvre_Myr347

The Terra Cotta medal, the new award for least successful marketing campaign by an official partner, was contested by Visa Card, Omega, and Atos.

Visa Card had the visibility without the impact of the P&G, Coke, and Samsung efforts.  Omega’s rank is a conundrum:  It appeared on the screen during every timed event, yet it, apparently, did not register in the minds of the global audience.  (This needs to be rectified.)  And Atos apparently doesn’t mind ‘winning’ the first Terra Cotta medal, since it has been dubbed the ‘Unsung Hero’ of the Games for creating Sochi’s vast (and effective) IT infrastructure.

“The value of Olympic sponsorship continues to rise as evidenced by the bold attempts by the Ambush Marketers to associate their brands with the Sochi Winter Games.” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.   “The more stringent the legislation to outlaw any effort to ‘ambush’ the Games, the more marketers seem intent on circumventing the rules.  And the more news related to ‘ambushing’ is highlighted by the media.  An example is a Sochi official taping over Apple’s logo in plain site of the global media (#EpicFailure)”.

GLM uses its proprietary algorithmic services to perform brand audits, enabling organizations to judge their brand performance between and among their competitors and their peers.  The higher the BAI (Brand Affiliation Index) the closer the brand affiliation with the primary brand, in this case the Sochi Winter Olympics. Of course, not all Ambush Marketers plan to steal the Olympic glow from their competitors, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad.

Therefore, GLM uses the term Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) for those, like Starbucks, who seem to engender a false impression of Olympic sponsorship, our research shows, because of their immense size, health-oriented menu, and image of busy, successful people dashing in and out. Nike, for example, is proud of its Ambush Marketing ‘stunts’ such as the ‘Yellow-Green Neon Shoe’ escapade in London 2012 — and the record backs them up.

The Sochi All Marketers Final Ranking by BAI  is shown below.

Sochi All Marketers BAI Final

Of particular note are the following.

0  Red Bull’s connection with extreme and ‘uber-extreme’ sports has paid off, once again.  Red Bull topped all marketers (official and otherwise), out-distancing the Gold-winning P&G, the top official sponsor, by some nine percent.

o  The Nike Stunt that Never Was — Though long anticipated, and expected, never materialized.  At the end of the London Summer Games, Nike’s BAI reached 223.98, compared with its final Sochi BAI of 30.25, a net difference of nearly 200 points. Nevertheless, the fact that some twenty months after London,  Nike is still ahead of three official Sponsors is testament to the lasting power of the London Stunt.

o  P&G’s “Thank you, Mom” campaign had viewers anticipating and actually recording the commercials for later viewing.  The 316% increase from already-solid final London numbers is well deserved.

o  Subway, the Ambush Silver medalist’s year-round promotions with current and former Olympic icons worked once again.  Subway’s 176.31 BAI topped that of eight of the 10 official sponsors.

0  In the battle between Coca-Cola, the Bronze medalist, and McDonald’s, long-time Olympic sponsors (and rivals), Coke more than doubled McDonald’s BAI (171.59 to 85.22).   The back story here:  Coca-Cola rose 48% from it London final, while McDonald’s was down about 8%.

o  Unilever (109.73), the P&G rival finished as the No. 4 NAM and No.8 marketer overall.  Unilever rose some 800% over its London final (11.93).

o  GE had a noteworthy Olympics rising some 60% over a very respectable London performance (91.22 vs 55.97).  GE’s commercials deftly detailed its incredibly broad range of products and services in a very entertaining manner.  Rival Siemens also scored well, in fact, actually besting GE by about nine percent.

o  Apple Computer and Burton Snowboards both made an impression with the worldwide audience:  the former with the ‘tape incident’ where an Apple logo was taped over by a Sochi official (Mistake:  taping in full view  of the media) during a skating competition, and Burton, for its brazen attempt to place its over-sized logo on the very visible  underside of the boards of prominent snowboarders.

London to end of Sochi
Change Over Course of Sochi


In the study, GLM measured several dozen factors, including the change in BAI from the end of the London Summer Games in 2012 to the end of the Sochi Winter Games for both Top Partners and Non-Affiliated Marketers.

In percentage gains, the Top Partners almost doubled, rising over 95%.  The biggest movers were Samsung, P&G, and Dow — all scoring triple-digit gains by percentage.

However, the Non-Affiliated Marketers on the average almost quadrupled, up over 358%.

.The largest gainers were Rolex (with a 1500% gain), Red Bull,Unilever, DuPont, and Siemens (all with triple-digit gains), and Subway.

Measuring brands movements during the Sochi Games,themselves,  six of the Top Ten gainers were Ambushers, as shown below.

Sochi Change During Games

Red Bull made the largest move during the Sochi Games, followed by Top Partners GE and DOW.   Coca-Cola and McDonald’s (at No. 7 and 8) were the other Top Partners in the top ten.  Non-Affiliated Marketers Unilever, DuPont, IBM Global Services, Nike, and Starbucks all made strong moves during the Games.

The “Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available; order here.

Over the last four Olympics, the Global Language Monitor has been using its Brand Affiliation Index and NarrativeTracker technology to measure the relationship of the official Sponsors and their competitors to the various Olympics brands. This is a longitudinal study that reaches back to the Beijing Summer Games in 2008. The names of the sponsors change rarely, but the non-affiliated competitors remain a core group with others that come on to the Olympic platform for but a cycle or two. GLM has found that there are many misconceptions continue to persist despite the evidence.

If you are looking for these or similar analyses for your event, company, organization, university, or brands, call 1.512.815.8836, or email info@LanguageMonitor.com.

About the Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.  The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.  Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.
These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.
 ”Sochi Games Brand Marketing Report:  Post-Games Analysis”  is now available for download order here.

 

 

 

Sochi 2014 Brand Marketing Games: Subway Leads P&G for Gold, Red Bull vs. GE for Silver, McDonald’s Falters

Sochi Olympic Logo
Sochi Rings

Where’s Nike?

Subway Leads P&G for Gold, Red Bull vs. GE for Silver, McDonald’s Falters

Terra Cotta Medals Introduced

Sochi Olympics Week Two, February, 2014 Austin, Texas — After the first full week of the Sochi Winter Games, the marketing medal count finalized with the competition between and among the official sponsors and the Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) is tight, according to the Global Language Monitor.  Some highlights include Subway leading P&G for the Gold, Red Bull contending with GE for Silver, and McDonald’s apparently faltering thus far.  The complete details are shown in the charts below.

Also, since no one can be eliminated from the Games once they begin, GLM has introduced the Terra Cotta medal in addition to the traditional Gold, Silver, and Bronze.  In the Ancient world, Terra Cotta was considered the least valuable material for permanence (after gold, silver, and bronze).

The Terra Cotta Medal is depicted below.

Sochi Silver Medal
Sochi Silver Medal
Sochi Gold Medal
Sochi Gold Medal
Sochi Bronze Medal
Sochi Bronze Medal
Terra Cotta Medal
Terra Cotta Medal

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“While the eyes of the world are focused on the athletes and the intense struggle on the ice and snow in Sochi, the eyes of the marketing world are keenly aware of the battle being waged for the billions of dollars in brand equity for being associated with the Winter Games.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.

Some highlights from the longitudinal study:

  • P&G has had an extraordinary Olympics thus far and will be in serious contention for the overall Gold.
  • Coke has a towering lead over McDonald’s, more a testament to Coke improving and Mickey D’s essentially treading water.
  • Rolex has improved , in terms of BAI from 6.1 in London to 144.23 today.
  • Red Bull leads the pack in the for Silver contenders.  After all, if you jump from a Space Capsule to Earth, you’re must be affiliated with Red Bull.
  • GE and Siemens are neck-and-neck; Siemens moved down two spots, while GE was up four.
  • Unilever sits comfortably at No. 9,  up one from last week.
  • Great commercials are bringing home the fact GE is (a lot) more than light bulbs.
  • Dow (No. 13) is up 2 this week, while DuPont (No.14) is down 2.
  • IBM Global Services and Atos Origin come in at No. 19 and 21, however they are both B-to-B plays and as long as they connect to the right people.
  • Omega deserves a higher profile; though they are on the screen for key moments of every competition, they are down in Terra Cotta territory.
  • Finally, Where is Nike?  They are ready to pounce, but no pouncing evidenced thus far.

Sochi Olympics Marketing Race: Subway Leads Ambush Marketers, Samsung and P&G Lead Top Sponsors

 

See Final Medal Standings
Final Marketing Medal Standings

Subway takes the early combined-event lead; Rolex, Red Bull, and Nike among fastest Risers

Sochi Olympics Week One, February, 2014 Austin, Texas — The first stage of the Sochi Olympics Marketing race is in the books.  And thus far the Non-affiliated Marketers are making their impact felt.  

In the early the first stage of the two-week long event,  the Non-affiliated Marketers (or Ambush Marketers) are leading the TOP Sponsors by GLM’s Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) by a significant margin in a number of measures.

Sochi-Marketing-Leaders-Week 1

“Though not as prestigious as the games on the field, in the snow, and on the ice, the Ambush Marketing Race can mean billions in profits for the winners, and uncontrollable value leaks to the losers,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.

The ten TOP Sochi Sponsors are Atos Origin, Coca-Cola, Dow, GE, McDonald’s, Omega, P&G, Panasonic, Samsung, and Visa Card.  

The eleven Non-affiliated (or Ambush Marketers) are Adidas, DuPont, IBM Global Services, Nike, Pepsi, Philips, Red Bull, Rolex, Siemens, Starbucks, Subway, and Unilever.  

Some of these organizations compete head-to-head with the Top Sponsors, such as IBM Global Services (vs. Atos Origin), Pepsi and Red Bull (vs. Coca-Cola), DuPont (vs. Dow Chemical), Royal Philips (vs. General Electric), while others simply co-opt the Olympic brand equity to their own particular advantage.

The Global Language Monitor uses proprietary algorithmic services to perform brand audits, enabling organizations to judge their brand performance between and among their competitors and their peers.  

The higher the BAI (Brand Affiliation Index) the closer the brand affiliation with the primary brand, in this case the Sochi Winter Olympics. Of course, not all Ambush Marketers plan to steal the Olympic glow from their competitors, a cost estimated to be up to $1 billion, fully loaded, over a four-year Olympiad.

Therefore, GLM uses the term Non-affiliated Marketers (NAM) for those, like Starbucks, who seem to engender a false impression of Olympic sponsorship, our research shows, because of their immense size, health-oriented menu, and image of busy, successful people dashing in and out. Nike, for example, is proud of its Ambush Marketing ‘stunts’ such as the ‘Yellow-Green Neon Shoe’ escapade in London 2012.  and the record backs them up..  Twenty months after its stunt in London, it still is ranks higher than the BAI of three IOC Partners..

Subway, in turn, leads all Sochi Marketers with its unbridled, and some say outrageous athlete-focused commercials.   As you see in the along side chart, six of the top ten and eleven of the top 20 marketers fit into the NAM category.  (You can see that Red Bull is firmly ensconced in the top ten.

Over the last four Olympics, the Global Language Monitor has been using its Brand Affiliation Index and NarrativeTracker technology to measure the relationship of the official Sponsors and their competitors to the various Olympics brands. This is a longitudinal study that reaches back to the Beijing Summer Games in 2008.  The names of the sponsors change rarely, but the non-affiliated competitors remain a core group with others that come on to the Olympic platform for but a cycle or two. GLM has found that there are many misconceptions continue to persist despite the evidence.

One of these misconceptions is that ambush marketing ‘stunts’ are wildly successful, such as Nike’s green shoe stunt in London.  The Data say yes-and-no.  The stunt made quite an impression for a week or two, and the lingering value can be seen in the Sochi Leaders by BAI chart.  In the along side chart, you see that Nike has a current BAI of 26.30; immediately after the London stunt it measured 120.5.

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Read more

New York Takes Top Global Fashion Capital Title from London, edging past Paris

  The Global Language Monitor’s 10th Annual Survey

   The Difference between New York and Paris was 0.05%

   And No. 4?  Los Angeles! Yes, LA.

February Fashion Weeks, 2014 New York and Austin, Texas — New York was reclaimed the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital from London, which had held the tile for 2011 and 2012.  Paris, which also won the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture, finished in the No. 2 spot overall.  New York and Paris were separated by 0.05%, the closest in the 10-year history of the Global Language Monitor’s survey.   In another development, Los Angeles move into the esteemed Big  Four status, moving up five spots from 2012.

Coming Later in 2014:  The Global Fashion Capital Institute

Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan

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The rest of the Top Ten included:  Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.    Berlin solidified its position, while Antwerp completed it steady climb, Sydney had a triumphal return, and Shanghai returns to what many consider its rightful place in the Top Ten.   Asia was well represented with Tokyo (11), Singapore (19), and Hong Kong (20) in the Top Twenty. 

“New York City has, indeed, earned its Top Global Fashion Capital ranking through its disciplined, methodical yet creative approach to its fashion industry.” said Bekka Payack, New York-based Fashion Director  for The Global Language Monitor.

FT Logo

                                                                                                            Read Vanessa Friedman for a UK point of view.

“Paris, with the Top Haute Couture ranking, of course has a centuries-long heritage, having invented the very concept, also scored highly in the pret-a-porter category.  This year’s rankings also demonstrate the creative energy that is emerging worldwide in terms of fashion as a jobs, income and wealth generator, not to mention the prestige associated with exporting your fashion sense to the world.”

Read About the Top US Fashion Economic Powerhouses in AtlanticCities

Paris Fashion Globe
London Fashion Traffic by Big Ben

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The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format:  Position, City, Change from 2012, and comment.

  1. New York (+1) — The Big Apple is back on top of the fashion world by slipping past Paris by .5%.
  2. Paris (+2) – The Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture is surprisingly strong in pret-a-porter, also.
  3. London (-2) – London has enjoyed a fabulous two-year run and is now secure in its place in the top echelon for global fashion.
  4. Los Angeles (+5) – Zut alors! Tinsel Town in the Top Four? The result of the melding of the Red Carpet, the Industry (film, of course), and West Coast cool.
  5. Barcelona (-2)  –  Espana, again, places two Fashion Capitals in the Top Fifteen.  Barcelona also wins the Top Fashion Capital for Swimwear. 
  6. Rome (0) — Rome may have Seven Hills but Italy now has Three Fashion Capitals (and Milan is No. 2).
  7. Berlin (+3)  – Berlin continues its steady rise moving deeper into the the elite ranks.
  8. Sydney (+7)  –  Sydney towers over OZ distancing (and distinguishing) itself, once again, from Melbourne.
  9. Antwerp (+2)  – Ah Antwerp, reverberations of the avant garde Antwerp Six continues into the 21st century.
  10. Shanghai (+12) –  As China further emerges onto the world stage, Shanghai leads the fashion charge.
  11. Tokyo (+9) – Tokyo made a leap in 2013 that many consider long overdue.
  12. Milano (-4)  –  Milan was the Top Global Fashion Capital back in 2009 and remains a strong contender for the top spot year-after-year.
  13. Florence (+3)  – Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli — A proud heritage to a thriving fashion industry in 2013.
  14. Madrid (-9) –  Still strong in 2013,  further cementing its place among the elite Fashion Capitals.
  15. Sao Paulo (-8)  – Again, the Queen of Latin American Fashion Capitals.
  16. St. Petersburg (+35)  –  Russian comes into 2014 with two Fashion Capitals in the Top Twenty, with Petrograd surprising  Moscow.   Read more

Mandela Tops All Media Funerals, except John Paul II’s, Since 1997

No. 3 Ronald Reagan, No. 4 Princess Diana, No. 5 Michael Jackson, No. 6 Mother Teresa

Lady Thatcher Does Not Make the Cut

Ranked by TrendTopper Internet MediaBuzz

Austin, TX January, 2014 – In an exclusive analysis performed by the Global Language Monitor, the death of Nelson Mandela has topped those of all global influencers since 1997 with the exception of Pope John II, back in 2005.

“The emergence of Nelson Mandela into the No. 2 position is a testimony to the universal appeal of the man and his ideals,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and the Chief Word Analyst of GLM, “especially in a time when superficialities such as ‘twerking’ and the taking of so-called ‘selfies,’ seem to monopolize the airways in all their many forms.”

The re-emergence of John Paul II into the top spot also is seen by some as a worthy tribute to a man who helped end Communism’s grip over Eastern Europe and beyond.  The legacy of  Ronald Reagan presidency is viewed as transformational by both US political parties which can account for his continued high regard.

John Paul II and Nelson Mandela Lead the Lisrt
John Paul II and Nelson Mandela Lead the Lisrt

 

Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II

 

Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan

 

 

Princess Diana
Princess Diana

 

Mother Teresa
Mother Teresa

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nelson Mandela took the No. 2 spot, ahead of Ronald Reagan (2004), Princess Diana (1997), the mother of the future line of British Monarchy, including Prince William, his wife Kate and their new son, George, Michael Jackson (2009) the entertainment icon, Mother Teresa (1997).  

Lady Thatcher, the long-serving British Prime Minister who died last April just missed the survey cutoff. Read more

Top Word of 2013: ’404′ followed by fail!, hashtag, @pontifex, and The Optic

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Toxic Politics is the Top Phrase, and Pope Francis the Top Name

Documenting 2013 by English-language word usage

Global Language Monitor’s 14th Annual Survey of Global English

Number of Words in the English Language:  1,025,109.8 (January 1, 2014 estimate)

OK is most understood word in the world, again.

AUSTIN, Texas  November 6, 2013  – The Global Language Monitor has announced that ‘404’ is the Top Word, ‘Toxic Politics’ the Top Phrase  and Pope Francis the Top Name of 2013 in its 14th annual global survey of the English language.  404 was followed by fail, hashtag, @pontifex, and the Optic.  Rounding out the top ten were surveillance, drones, deficit, sequestration, and emancipate.  404 is the near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet, augmenting its original use as ‘page not found’.  The single word fail is often used together with 404 to signify complete failure of an effort, project, or endeavor.

“404 has gained enormous attention the world over this year as systems in place since World War II, which many see as the beginning of the contemporary era, are in distress or even failure.” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  

“The recent ObamaCare launch debacle in the US is only a representative example of a much wider system fail, from the political deadlock in the US Government, to the decline of the dollar, to the global web of intrigue and surveillance by the NSA, to the uncertainty regarding the European Union, and the on-going integration of China and other rising powers, such as India and Brazil into the global economic system.

Our top words, phrases and names this year represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.”

The GLM Word, Phrase, and Names of the Year lists provide a history of each year since 2000 through English-language word usage.



Girl with Big Eyes Reading

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Click here for the Rediff Slide Show

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The Top Words of 2013 follow Rank / Word / Comments

  1. 404  –  The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet.
  2. Fail — The single word fail, often used as a complete sentence (Fail!) to signify failure of an effort, project, or endeavor.
  3. Hashtag  – The ‘number sign” and ‘pound sign’ reborn as the all-powerful Twitter hashtag.
  4. @Pontifex — The Hashage of the ever-more popular Pope Franciscus (Francis).
  5. The Optic — The ‘optic’ is threatening to overtake ‘the narrative’ as the Narrative overtook rational discourse. Does not bode well for an informed political discussion.
  6. Surveillance — The revelation of the unprecedented extent of spying by the NSA into lives of ordinary citizens to the leaders of the closest allies of the US.
  7. Drones  – Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) that are piloted remotely or by on-board computers used for killing scores or even hundreds of those considered enemy combatants of the US.
  8. Deficit — Looks like deficit-spending will plague Western democracies for at least the next decade.  Note to economists of all stripes:  reducing the rate of increase of deficit spending still  increases the deficit.
  9. Sequestration – Middle English sequestren, from Old French, from Latin sequestrareto hide away or isolate or to give up for safekeeping.
  10. Emancipate — Grows in importance as worldwide more women and children are enslaved in various forms of involuntary servitude. Read more

Healthcare Solutions

Global Language Monitor provides a suite of analytic capabilities that directly address the concerns of the Healthcare Market

Tracking Trends with NarrativeTracking’s Predictive Process Intelligence

 

Measuring productivity in the Service Sector carries a customer perception component.  The ability to track trends in public discourse is key to service-sector productivity

NarrativeTracker provides Internet-driven, Big Data, monitoring and social media numerical analytics along with relevant metrics

Predictive Process Intelligence with NarrativeTracker can detect inefficiency in any transaction-rich environment

  • Insurance
  • Financial services
  • Call centers
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Telecom
  • Government (e.g., the VA)

Detecting inefficiency can help uncover fraud and waste.

  • HealthCare’s ability to pay for itself with a 4% productivity increase
  • Though gains in productivity, and cuts in fraud and waste (documented by PWC)
  • HealthCare NarrativeTracker has successfully projected the trajectory of HealthCare narrative

NarrativeTracker’s trending ability of the HealthCare narrative is well documented

  • Gaming of the system
  • Resistance to mandate
  • Steadily rising costs

In the near future, Predictive Process Intelligence (PPI) has the ability to become a Leading Economic Indicator

TheHill Congress Blog

You Read it First on The Hill!

 

 

 

 

Healthcare NTI™ (NarrativeTracker Index™) is the first social media tracking tool designed to monitor public opinions on healthcare. Because the Healthcare NTI is based on the national (or regional or, even local) discourse – in real time, it provides a more accurate picture of what the public is actually thinking, on any topic, at any point in time.

 

NarrativeTracker: the First Social Media-based Tracking Tool Announced

NarrativeTracker Index™ to provide policy-makers unbiased public opinion on Healthcare Reform or any other topic.

Dallas and Austin, Texas, May 12, 2010 – Today, OpenConnect, an innovator in defining and improving process efficiency,and The Global Language Monitor ( GLM ), the media analytics company, announced the joint launch of the Healthcare NarrativeTracker Index™ ( NTI™ ), the first product specifically designed to use social media-based monitoring to better understand the issues driving healthcare reform.Because the Healthcare NTI is based on the national discourse, it provides a real-time, accurate picture of what the public is saying about any topic related to healthcare, at any point in time. In addition to the NTI, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative to provide a comprehensive overview of the opinions surrounding a single issue.

The ‘narrative’ refers to the stream of public opinion captured by blogs and other social media outlets on the Internet. The rise of the narrative actually renders positions on the issues almost meaningless, since positions now matter less than how they fit into a particular narrative.

“Just as the OpenConnect Comprehend solution provides an unprecedented view into a company’s workflows looking for process variations that drive inefficiency and waste, NTI tracks the ‘narrative’ of a subject, as well as projecting future trajectories for the narrative,” said Edward ML Peters, CEO of OpenConnect.

The result has several advantages over traditional polls:

1 ) Immediacy

2 ) The lack of any bias that tends to creep into traditional polling, e.g., when individuals answer questions with what they think are the ‘correct’ answers rather than their true opinions.

3 ) NTI lets policy and decision makers focus on the true issues driving perceptions and concerns rather than being driven by false and phantom concepts.

In addition, the Narrative Tracker Arc™ follows the rise and fall of sub-stories within the main narrative.

“The goal of influencers, whether it’s the media, advertisers or politicians, is to spin news so that it resonates best with their target audience,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. NTI is more effective in capturing the true opinion of the public because it tracks unfiltered keywords in Social Media and other sources, rather than how that opinion is interpreted by the news media or by pollsters.”

The NTI is based on the GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator™ ( PQI™ ). The PQI tracks the frequency of words and phrases in global print and electronic media on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere and other social media outlets as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted index that factors in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.

The Healthcare NTI will be released on a monthly basis beginning Thursday, May 13, 2010. The first analysis details the various narratives surrounding Massachusetts Healthcare reform, a healthcare model which has been adopted in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as the national healthcare reform bill.

About Open Connect

OpenConnect business process discovery and analytics deliver event-driven intelligence to automatically discover workforce, process and customer variations that hinder operational efficiency. Armed with this information, executives can make the quick and incremental improvements that will increase process efficiency, improve employee productivity, reduce cost, and raise profitability. With a rich history of developing innovative technology, OpenConnect products are distributed in more than 60 countries and used by more than 60 percent of Fortune 100 companies. For more information on OpenConnect, visit www.oc.com.

About The Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.

Since 2003, GLM has launched a number of innovative products and services monitoring the Internet, the Blogosphere, Social Media as well as the Top 275,000 print and electronic media sites.

Top 50 Business Buzzwords of 2013

Global Language Monitor’s First Annual Global Survey 

Complements the Tops Words of 2013, click here.

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AUSTIN, Texas  Holiday Weekend (Nov. 29 – Dec. 1, 2013) — The Global Language Monitor has announced its first annual Top 50 Global Business Buzzwords, a global survey.

Top 50 Global Business Buzzwords of 2013 represent some five continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language.”

Methodology:  GLM’s Word of the Year and Business Buzzwords of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Top 50 Business Buzzwords
GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 275,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.
The Top Business Buzzwords of 2013 follow Rank / Word / Comments
  1. Content — Far and away the No. 1 BizBuzz leader
  2. Social Media — Reality: Social media impacts less than 15% of the Web
  3. Sustainability – No. 1 Word in 2007; have been rising in BizBuzz every year
  4. Transparency – Remains a goal far from corporate reality
  5. Literally – Principally used in non-literal situation, eg, Literally, “an explosion of laughter”
  6. Guru – Someone moderately skilled in a subject or particular field (cf ‘rocket scientist’ or ‘brain surgeon’)
  7. Utilize (rather than use) – Please deflate the diction and utilize the word ‘use’
  8. Robust – Applies to oh-so-many products: software, tablets (computer and otherwise), coffee, perfume, mileage, and hundreds of others
  9. Ping — High tech lingo seeping into the mainstream; now it means ‘get back to you’. Originally, a tool to send message packres to a network address to measure the time & quality of the response.
  10. Big Data — Soon Human Knowledge will be doubling every second. ’Big’ does not begin to describe what’s coming at us. 
  11. Any noun used as a verb – to concept. to ballpark, and the like ….
  12. Seamless – Seldom actually seamless (Cf Obamacare website), often merely ‘seemless’ or meaningless
  13. Moving Forward — From the results of those countless ‘moving forwards’, moving sideways might be more appropriate
  14. The Cloud — Everything (and every one) now apparently ‘lives in the cloud’ though networking clouds pre-date the web by a decade or two
  15. Offline – ‘I’ll be offline’. The statement is meaningless unless one includes cell phones, tablets,smarty TVs, not to mention all atomic clocks.
  16. Bandwidth – Measurement of electronic communications devices to send and receive information with upper and lower limits
  17. New paradigm – Revolutionary new ideas that change the then-existing worldview; think Copernicus, think Newton, think Einstein, most definitely not your next product
  18. Synergy – The interaction of two efforts that result in a greater return than the sum of the two
  19. At-the-end-of-the-day — More likely the end of the quarter or fiscal year
  20. Win-Win — Much more positive than tie-tie or lose-lose
  21. Game changer – A step below a paradigm-shift but exaggeration nonetheless
  22. Pro-active – Evidently better than amateur-active
  23. Rock Star – What’s the hierarchy among Guru, Rocket Scientist, Brain Surgeon, and Rock Star?
  24. 30,000 ft level – Let’s decide if we are viewing the topic from the 30,000-, 40,000-, or 100,000 ft level. Airlines actually fly at a 35,000 ft cruise level
  25. Out-of-the-Box (experience) – OOBE is number 25 on the list of TrendTopper 
  26. Resonate – produce or be filled with a deep, full, reverberating sound, belief or emotion
  27. Monetize – The attempt to transmute Internet lead into gold.
  28. Double Down – To double an investment in an already risky proposition
  29. Deliverable – An output, product, result, or outcome; a term of great flexibility.
  30. 110% — We believe it’s time to synchronize the exertion scale. As a hiring manager how do you compare 110% from an Ivy school with an exertion level of 130% from the Big Ten? 
  31. Multi-task – Swapping in and out of tasks quickly is the key to multi-tasking not doing many things as once which actually decreases productivity (as imagined by Dave Nelson and other tech industries in the 1970s).
  32. Rocket science – One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Brain surgeon).
  33. Ballpark – Another name for a ‘guesstimate’.
  34. Flounder – In history a fish found plentifully off the coast of New England, while a ship might ‘founder’ along it’s rocky coastline. Over time the act of foundering became collated with the fish. Your grasp of the language is telegraphed by this confusion.
  35. As if it was — As if it were, please. You know, conditional voice.
  36. In the Cloud — Yes, dwelling within the Cloud merits a special mention.
  37. Net-Net – Consider a sportswriter for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team: “The net-net for the Nets was the netting of the final shot.”
  38. Value-add – P+E+VA, where Product (is P) + Enhancement (is Ε ), and Value add (is VA)
  39. Future proof – In reality an impossible feat because it assumes you are cognizant of future events , in Marketing, just another day of concepting.
  40. Glass is half-full – Since 90% of new companies (and new products) fail, it might be better to adjust this cliché to: “Is the glass 1/10th full or 90% empty?”
  41. Face time – Before it was a product, it was a meeting with a C-Level executive.
  42. Re-purpose – Finding a new use for an old ‘solution. Unfortunately anything thing can be re-purposed ,including your job (or yourself).
  43. Brain surgery – One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Rocket Scientist.
  44. Rock-and-a-hard-place – A supposedly intractable situation though it usually gets back on track
  45. Bleeding edge – Leading edge of the leading edge
  46. Quick-and-dirty – Cited tens of thousands of times; we prefer ‘quick-and-clean’
  47. Push the envelope – A phrase few actually understand; Originally a descriptor of breaking through the sound barrier by X-Series Test Pilots (e.g., X-15)
  48. Touch base – Another baseball allusion: if you don’t actually touch the base you are ‘called out’. Cf Cricket allusions, such as using ‘sticky wicket ‘ for a quandary.
  49. Herding cats – Used in high tech circles for several decades regarding controlling headstrong engineers, a seemingly improbable task.
  50. Low-hanging fruit – Easy pickin’s for the sales force; unfortunately, obsolete since 2008
Word count: 1078 Draft saved at 9:54:02 am. Last edited by GLM on February 10, 2014 at 2:54 pm

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Gurus Utilizing Bandwidth of the Robust Big Data Cloud Through Social Media Content Sustainability – Russo Business Consulting
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[…] Don’t be alarmed by the subject line. I joke. This post is about the overuse of buzzwords in business communications. The words in my subject line were all taken from a global survey of the most used business buzzwords in 2013. This information is all available at the following website if you are interested in the rest of the list: http://www.languagemonitor.com/analysis/top-50-business-buzzwords-of-2013/ […]

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About The Global Language Monitor
Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.
For more information, call 1.512.815.8836, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Chinese puts in a good word for the English language

Chinese Puts in a Good Word for English
Chinese Puts in a Good Word for English

Reprinted From November 2, 2013

Chinese puts in a good word for the English language

Updated: 2013-11-02 00:37

By JIN ZHU in Beijing and CHEN JIA in San Francisco (China Daily)


Words of Chinese origin are playing a key role in driving the ongoing globalization of English, experts in both languages say.

“The fact that some 300 million Chinese people are now studying or have studied English means the important impact of Chinese on the language can’t be denied,” said Paul J.J. Payack, president and chief analyst at Global Language Monitor.

The consultancy, based in Austin in the US state of Texas, documents, analyzes and tracks trends in language usage worldwide, with a particular emphasis on English.

It says some 10,000 words are added to the English language annually, with about 1.83 billion people using English as their native, second, business or technical language.

But the global figure was only about 250 million in 1960, with English-speakers mainly located in Britain and its Commonwealth of former colonies, as well as the United States.

“It’s estimated that a new English word is created every 98 minutes,” Payack said.

“One example of a word used in English that originated from Chinese that has appeared recently is chengguan (city patrol officer). A quick Google search results in nearly a million citations, far in excess of our minimum number of required citations.”

The Oxford English Dictionary, which waits 10 years before entering a word to ensure it has “staying power”, now has about 1,000 words of Chinese origin, such as taikonaut.

Read more

ObamaCare Website Roll-out Broke the Seven Laws of High Tech Branding

 

 

 

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“… it’s all about the brand.”

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AUSTIN, Texas. October 25, 2013 — According to a report released by the Global Language Monitor, there are seven laws of high technology branding that organizations violate at great risk to their brand equity, their product, their reputation — and their future or even survival.  Now, even its staunchest defenders admit that the ObamaCare Website Roll-out was a flawed, less than stellar effort, communicating incompetence, or worse.  However, from a marketing perspective, the firestorm over the ObamaCare Website Roll-out was a direct result of the Administration’s violation of the Seven Laws of High Technology Branding.

The Seven Laws of High Tech Branding are key to ultimate success or failure because these rules are not arbitrary whims, folklore, or random suggestions, but rather the experience of hundreds or even thousands of high technology companies, most of which you have never heard of, or remember only, as fleeting brands that dazzled, shooting across the firmament, only to be consumed by their own incandescence, rapidly fading into oblivion (e,g. Univac, Sperry, Burroughs, Commodore, Wang, Prime, Data General, and the like).

We often write of the importance of brands and brand equity and their importance to contemporary society in these pages.  Indeed, we live in a world where the value of our choices, options, and opportunities are constantly being weighed against one another. This constant, continuing and continual evaluation is the basis of what we call ‘brand equity’. We define ‘brand equity’ as the value that is placed on any branded-entity as compared to all the others. Branded entities can be any person, place, idea or thing.

In the world of High Technology, where ObamaCare now, perhaps unfairly,  finds itself, it’s all about the brand.

Read more

Big Ten Top Conference & Ohio State Top School in ‘Best & Brightest’ Football Poll

 

Ohio State Tops TrendTopper ‘Best & Brightest’ Football Poll 

Florida State breaks into Top 10; Georgia, South Carolina, Clemson, and Louisville Plummet

Navy sails to the No. 12 Spot

“Best and Brightest”™  BCS rankings combine athletic prowess with academic achievement

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Austin, TEXAS, October 25 2013  –  Ohio State Tops TrendTopper ‘Best & Brightest’ Football Poll; Florida State breaks into Top 10; Georgia, South Carolina, Clemson, and Louisville plummeted.  With the addition of Houston and Louisiana-Lafayette, a total of Sixty-five schools were included in this week’s ranking. The  TrendTopper Best & Brightest Football Rankings are the only BCS Football rankings that combine athletic prowess with academic achievement.  

“Ohio State is the top Big Ten school in the TrendTopper MediaBuzz Higher Education rankings, so we are pleased to see the cream rising to the top of the ‘Best & Brightest’ Football Rankings,” said Paul  JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst for GLM.  ”In fact, five of the Top 25 schools are from the Big Ten conference, while four of the Top 25 belong to the Pac 10.”  

In a previous study on the Impact of Conference Re-alignment on Academic Reputation, GLM found that the Big Ten emerged as the Top BCS Conference for Academic Reputation.

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Brand Audits

 

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities.  Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands.  

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

 

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BCS Championship Projection: Stanford vs. Ohio State; Washington vs. Georgia

 

Stanford Tops Best & Brightest Football Rankings followed by Ohio State, UDub & Georgia 

Biggest Movers:  Florida (+18), Auburn (+14), Texas Tech (+9), Mizzou (+5), and Nebraska (+5)

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“Best and the Brightest™ BCS rankings combine athletic prowess with academic achievement

Austin, TEXAS, October 11 2013  – The current BCS Championship Projection from the Best & Brightest Football Rankings are:  Stanford vs. Ohio State; Washington vs. Georgia.  These projections are based on the Best & Brightest Football Rankings of October 7th.  Stanford was No.1 followed by Ohio State, UDub, Georgia, UCLA, and Oregon.

The biggest movers this week on the positive side were Florida (+18), Auburn (+14), Texas Tech (+9), and Mizzou (+5), and Nebraska (+5). On the negative side of the ledger were Arizona State (-12) and Ole Miss (-6).  With the addition of Ball State, a total of Sixty-three schools were ranked this week’s ranking.    The  Best & Brightest Football Rankings are the only BCS Football rankings that combine athletic prowess with academic achievement.  

“We are seeing that BCS-level colleges need not sacrifice their academic missions to field a quality football program,” said Paul  JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst for GLM.  ”The semi-finalists all rank in the Top 30 of the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings.”

To create the ”Best and the Brightest™ rankings, the Global Language Monitor (GLM) combined the results of the AP Writers and USAToday Coaches polls with the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings.

Read more

The “Best and the Brightest™ BCS Football rankings combine athletic prowess with academic achievement

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Stanford No. 1, No.2 OSU, No.3 UDub, No.4 Georgia, No.5 UCLA, No.6 Oregon

TrendTopper Best and the Brightest™ BCS Football rankings 

First Weekly Appearance

Austin, TEXAS, October 2, 2013   Stanford, Ohio State, Washington take the top three spots in the TrendTopper Top 40 Football Poll — the first BCS Football rankings that combine athletic prowess with academic achievement.  To create the “Best and the Brightest™ rankings, the Global Language Monitor (GLM) combined the results of the AP Writers and USAToday Coaches polls with the TrendTopper MediaBuzz College Rankings.   Following Stanford, were Ohio State, Washington, Georgia, and UCLA.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Oregon, Texas A&M, Virginia Tech, Wisconsin, and Florida State.

“This is the first time that football prowess and academic performance are given equal weight,” said Paul  JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst for GLM.  ”The TrendTopper  Top 40 Football Poll helps address the rising chorus of criticism addressed at BSC-level colleges for sacrificing their academic missions on the altar of ever-increasing television revenues.”

The TrendTopper  Top 40 Football Poll will be released weekly through the BCS National Championship.

The complete TrendTopper  Top 40 Football Poll follows.

Read more

Twerk Top Television Word of the Year – 10th Annual Analysis

 

Tenth Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas, USA. September 27, 2013 (Updated).  The Global Language Monitor (GLM) today announced that “Twerk” is the Top Teleword of the Year followed by “Tread lightly,” “Facial profiling,” “Posh Soap,” and “Valar Morghulis”.   Rounding out the top ten were “Jersey Shore,” ”Honey Boo Boo,” “Royal Baby,” “Space jump,” and “@Pontifex”.

The awards are announced in conjunction with the Primetime Emmy awards at the beginning of the Fall television season in the US. This is the tenth annual analysis by Austin-based GLM. 

“This is the first time we are recognizing words and phrases from all four screens of contemporary communications:  the television, the computer, the tablet and the smart phone.  Accordingly, this year’s words have originated (and spread) from any of the devices to the others ” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. “This year’s list reflects the massive, never ceasing, continuing flow of information bombarding people the world over.”

The Top Telewords of the 2012-2013 season with commentary follow:

Read more

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