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Top Words of the Year 2017 — Tumultuous Words for Tempestuous Times

 

  The English language well represents the tumultuous and tempestuous world of today.

 

Excellent Question, Will …

 

July 24, 2017, Austin, TEXAS, and NEW YORK — The Global Language Monitor (GLM) today announced the Top Words of the Year (#WOTY) for 2017.

Truth continues as the Top Word of the Year, while Narrative continues in second place. Reflecting the rising alarm GLM first pointed to during the first presidential debates, Opioids made the leap from No. 10 to No.3. Of the next seven spots, all were new to the rankings with the exception of the Nuclear Option (Korea), which moved up two spots to No. 5. New words included Woke, Deep State, and Robot Apocalypse. Regarding ‘fake news,’ newly unmasked as an ethnic slur, the term was supplanted by the concept of a ‘higher level of fake news’ — a time-honored methodology of creating and planting ‘legitimate’ news stories. The most downward trending were Brexit falling eight spots to No. 12, and No. 3 #Resist most dramatically dropping from No. 3 to No. 19.

GLM also announced that the Global English Word of the Year for 2016 was not a word but a meme: the blood-soaked image of Omran Daqneesh, five years old, sitting in an ambulance while awaiting treatment in Allepo, Syria. (Click Here to see Top Global English Words of 2016.)

Covfefe, the Trumpian Typo heard ‘round the world, crossed GLM’s Triple Threshold to make the 2017 #WOTY list, with some 400,000+ media citations alone. 

The amount of linguistic churn in this three-month span is interesting in the extreme.  In fact, the English language well represents the tumultuous and tempestuous world of today.” said Paul JJ Payack, President, and Chief Word Analyst of GLM. “If this churn persists for a significantly longer period of time, this will presage an unprecedented moment in its history. “

‘Truth’ is Top Word of the Year,     2017 (#WOTY) in Both Analyses

 

Comparison with the earlier version continue below.

 

The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century

2016:
Top Words: No. 1 Truth, No. 2 Narrative, No. 3, #Resist
Top Phrases: No. 1 Make America Great Again No. 2 When they go low, we go high No. 3 The Electoral College
Top Names: No. 1 Donald Trump, No. 2 Vladimir Putin, No. 3 Neil Gorsuch

2015:
Top Words: No. 1 Microaggression
Top Phrases: No. 1 Migrant Crisis
Top Names: No. 1 Donald J. Trump

2014:
Top Words: No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) , No. 2 Hashtag , No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases: No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot; No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names: No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War I

2013:
Top Words: No. 1 ’404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:
Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:
Top Word: Misunderestimate
Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

Methodology:  The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

For More Information, go to LanguageMonitor.com or call 1.512.801.6823.

 

The ThoughtTopper Institute

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The articles included in this ThoughtTopper Institute series were first drafted by Paul JJ Payack over the last several years.  Subsequently, some of the originals were expanded with Edward ML Peters, Ph.D. and published in The Hill and other publications.

Paul JJ Payack

 The premise of the original articles was that economists and politicians and intellectual thought leaders had missed the essence of the profound worldwide economic, electronic, and academic transformations that had been underway for some time and would continue into the future if constrained by this profoundly limited vision.

In fact, the facts have borne out our original assumptions.  The Global Economic Restructuring has continued unabated.  China continues to rise, the US and the West continue to struggle, and the ancient question of what is real (and true) has again risen to the forefront.

The Lost Decade of Japan has indeed been replicated, as we had feared.  The recovery did not mirror previous recoveries in the US.  And the traditional manufacturing sector continues to erode.

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D

Paul JJ Payack is president of Austin-based Global Language Monitor.

Edward ML Peters, Ph.D. is the managing director of Austin-based ThoughtTopper Institute.

Their most recent book is “The Paid-for Option”, which describes how healthcare reform can actually pay for itself through the application of process intelligence and its attendant gains in productivity.

 

Paris Towers Over World of Fashion — as Top Global Fashion Capital

Top Global Fashion            Capitals 12th Edition       Announced August 30th

The Global Language Monitor’s 11th  Survey

Paris nearly doubled Scores of New York and London

 

Paris Fashion Week, Autumn 2015, New York and Austin, Texas — Paris has stunned New York City toppling it from its one year reign as the Top Global Fashion Capital in the Global Language Monitor’s 11th Annual survey. London remained in the third spot as did L.A.at No. 4.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Rome, Milano, Barcelona, Berlin, and Madrid, followed by Tokyo. Currently, there are fifty-six fashion capitals being charted, with a number under watch for 2016.

In 2015 GLM added one city to the analysis, Washington, DC,  which made a splash, er belly flopped, to No. 53.

“In a world torn by war, repression, and the brutal subjugation of women and girls, fashion remains a bastion of self-expression,” said Paul JJ Payack, Chief Word Analyst and president of GLM.  “And fashion can be a force for good that can be experienced in a positive manner in every culture and tradition.”

Paris redevient la capitale mondiale de la mode

 

It is a verdict made for eleven years and which, regularly, brings its share of surprises. Between the emerging cities and the four major cities - Paris, New York, London and Milan - which compete for first place, the Global Language Monitor’s ranking of fashion capitals is highly anticipated. At the time when New York Fashion Week opens, the results have just fallen.

Moving up from No.12 to No.6 word ordinarily send the City’s Fashion Establishment into an ecstatic state.  
Not so, if you are Milano. And especially so if you followed by Roma, at No. 5.

Last March, Milano was the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2015 followed by Suede, Booty, and Kate’s Baby Girl. 
However, this is a far cry from the Top Global Fashion Capital ranking, where Milano then ranked No. 12. (sic?).  
Much of the internet media buzz, not all of it positive, revolves upon these efforts to revive its ‘brand’.

Recent reports from Milano Moda Donna 2015 were mixed

Milan has been working hard to re-establish itself as the pre-eminent capital of Global Fashion, or at least to being consistently named as one of the Big Four (with Paris, New York, and London).   Currently, the No. 4 spot is occupied by LA, which GLM sees as representing the Red Carpet phenomenon.

After an extraordinary two-year reign (2011-2012), London has settled into the No. 3 spot, comfortably behind Paris and New York — for the second year in a row.    London also took the third spot in all four major areas of measurement used in determining the annual rankings for the Global Language Monitor.

.
Last year New York topped Paris by less than .05%, the tightest margin ever.   This year Paris returned the favor — and then some
— by nearly doubling New York’s score.

In another first, Paris topped all four categories worldwide.

Sydney remains strong as Melbourne falters; for the first time, New Delhi and Mumbai resulted
in a virtual dead heat.
The Global Fashion Capitals for Swimwear were Miami, Barcelona, and Bali.
Barcelona, Berlin, and Madrid remain hot as does what we are now calling the Asian Fashion Cluster:  Tokyo, Singapore, Shanghai and Hong Kong.
Seoul remains on the outside, very outside, of the Cluster at No. 56.
The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format: Ranking, Fashion Capital, and Previous Position.
The Watch List for 2017 includes Abidjan, Accra, Auckland, Beirut, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, and Lagos.

Top Fashion Capitals by Region

Europe:
Paris, London, Rome, Milano, Barcelona, Berlin, Madrid, Florence, Monaco, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Frankfurt.
India:
Mumbai, New Delhi (statistical dead heat)
Australia:
Sydney, Melbourne
East Asia:
Tokyo, Singapore, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Seoul
RSA:
Cape Town, Johannesburg
Middle Europe:
Moscow, Prague, Vienna, St Petersburg, Warsaw and Krakow
Canada:

Toronto, Montreal, high techand Vancouver,

Mideast:
Dubai, Abu Dhabi
Spain:
Barcelona, Madrid
Latin America:
Sao Paulo, Rio de Janerio, Buenos Aires, Caracas, , Santiago and Mexico City
Regional US:
New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Dallas, Boston, Las Vegas, Chicago, Houston, Atlanta, San Francisco, Austin and Washington, DC
Methodology: For this analysis, the Global Language Monitor used its proprietary Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), 
the same technology used to measure global brand equity for the Olympics, World Cup, the Fortune 500, and others. 
This exclusive, GLM longitudinal-study encompasses the prior three years to better assess short-term velocity 
and longer-term momentum. The study is a Big Data textual analysis based on billions of webpages, millions of blogs, 
the top 375,000 global print, and electronic media, and new social media formats as they appear. 
This is the eleventh edition of the survey, which was first made public in 2007.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of high-tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

 




“All Things New York City” are the Top Fashion Buzzwords of 2014

The Seventh Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

 

NEW YORK, September 12, 2014 – “All things New York” has been named the Top Fashion Buzzword for 201 4, in the Global Language Monitor’s seventh annual ranking.  Attitude, Reds, Underbut(t) and Visible Panty Lines (VPL) follow.  Boyfriend Jeans,  Side Boobs, The Kardashian Clan, Robe-style Coats, and Pastels follow.

All Things New York”, capturing the essence of the New York fashion sense, dominates the 2014 Top Fashion Buzzword list,” said Rebecca Roman, Manhattan-based Fashion Director for GLM. “It is difficult to think of any global fashion trend that does not have a strong presence, if not its origin,  in the New York City.

For the current list of the Top 50 Fashion Capitals Go here

The Top Fashion Buzzwords of 2014 follow:

Rank, Buzzword, Comment

  1. “All things New York” — In 2014 New York stands astride the world of fashion.
  2. Attitude — It’s not just what you wear but how you wear it.
  3. Reds — Big, bold, and bright.
  4. Underbut(t) — Yes, we said ‘underbut(t).
  5. VPL (Visible Panty Lines) — For decades, the idea was to eliminate VPL; VPLs are now in style.
  6. Boyfriend Jeans — Popular but not always fashionable.
  7. Side Boobs — Same as above.
  8. The Kardashian Clan — Same as above.
  9. Robe-style Coats — More bedroom-style in the streets.
  10. Pastels — Appropriate now for all seasons.
  11. Funky Eye Makeup — You know it when you see it.
  12. Earthy Tones — Mixing various earth tones together.
  13. Sneakers — Still popular in all shapes and sizes.
  14. Transparents — Updated Peek-a-boo look.
  15. Sweaters — Particularly Wool, particularly big.

Methodology:  GLM’s various word analyses are longitudinal in nature covering a number of years that varies with the particular analysis.  The rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people.  GLM analyses billions of web pages, millions of blogs, 300,000 print and electronic news organizations, and new social media sites as they emerge.  To qualify for GLM’s lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Top Fashion Buzzwords of previous years include:

  • London (2013)
  • the Princess Effect (2012)
  • Kate Middleton (2011)
  • Lady Gaga (2010), and
  • Chiconomics (2009)

Each year, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Global Fashion Capitals. In 2013 New York topped Paris and London followed by Los Angeles (!?), Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.

About the Global Language Monitor
In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.
Today, from its home in Austin, Texas Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogs the latest trends in word usage and word choices and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.
For more information, call 512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.




New York Takes Top Global Fashion Capital Title from London, edging past Paris

The Global Language Monitor’s 10th Annual Survey

 The Difference between New York and Paris was 0.05%    And No. 4?  Los Angeles! Yes, LA. February Fashion Weeks, 2014 New York and Austin, Texas — New York has reclaimed the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital from London, which had held the tile for 2011 and 2012.  Paris, which also won the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture, finished in the No. 2 spot overall.  New York and Paris were separated by 0.05%, the closest in the 10-year history of the Global Language Monitor’s survey.   In another development, Los Angeles moved into the esteemed Big  Four status, moving up five spots from 2012.. The rest of the Top Ten included:  Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.    Berlin solidified its position, while Antwerp completed it steady climb, Sydney had a triumphal return, and Shanghai returns to what many consider its rightful place in the Top Ten.   Asia was well represented with Tokyo (11), Singapore (19), and Hong Kong (20) in the Top Twenty.  “New York City has, indeed, earned its Top Global Fashion Capital ranking through its disciplined, methodical yet creative approach to its fashion industry,” said Bekka Payack, New York-based Fashion Director  for The Global Language Monitor.

Midtown Manhattan, the center of it all

 

The rest of the Top Ten included:  Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.    Berlin solidified its position, while Antwerp completed it steady climb, Sydney had a triumphal return, and Shanghai returns to what many consider its rightful place in the Top Ten.   Asia was well represented with Tokyo (11), Singapore (19), and Hong Kong (20) in the Top Twenty.  “New York City has, indeed, earned its Top Global Fashion Capital ranking through its disciplined, methodical yet creative approach to its fashion industry,” said Bekka Payack, New York-based Fashion Director  for The Global Language Monitor.

Read Vanessa Friedman for a UK point of view.

“Paris, with the Top Haute Couture ranking, of course, has a centuries-long heritage, having invented the very concept, also scored highly in the pret-a-porter category.  This year’s rankings also demonstrate the creative energy that is emerging worldwide in terms of fashion as a jobs, income and wealth generator, not to mention the prestige associated with exporting your fashion sense to the world.

Read About the Top US Fashion Economic Powerhouses in AtlanticCities

Paris Came in at No. 2, but Watch this Space …

After a great 2-year run atop the rankings, London has settled comfortably into the No. 2 spot

. The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format:  Position, City, Change from 2012, and comment.

  1. New York (+1) — The Big Apple is back on top of the fashion world by slipping past Paris by .5%.
  2. Paris (+2) — The Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture is surprisingly strong in pret-a-porter, also.
  3. London (-2) — London has enjoyed a fabulous two-year run and is now secure in its place in the top echelon for global fashion.
  4. Los Angeles (+5) — Zut alors! Tinsel Town in the Top Four? The result of the melding of the Red Carpet, the Industry (film, of course), and West Coast cool.
  5. Barcelona (-2)  —  Espana, again, places two Fashion Capitals in the Top Fifteen.  Barcelona also wins the Top Fashion Capital for Swimwear.
  6. Rome (0) — Rome may have Seven Hills but Italy now has Three Fashion Capitals (and Milan is No. 2).
  7. Berlin (+3)  — Berlin continues its steady rise moving deeper into the the elite ranks.
  8. Sydney (+7)  —  Sydney towers over OZ distancing (and distinguishing) itself, once again, from Melbourne.
  9. Antwerp (+2)  — Ah Antwerp, reverberations of the avant garde Antwerp Six continues into the 21st century.
  10. Shanghai (+12) —  As China further emerges onto the world stage, Shanghai leads the fashion charge.
  11. Tokyo (+9) — Tokyo made a leap in 2013 that many consider long overdue.
  12. Milano (-4)  —  Milan was the Top Global Fashion Capital back in 2009 and remains a strong contender for the top spot year-after-year.
  13. Florence (+3)  — Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli — A proud heritage to a thriving fashion industry in 2013.
  14. Madrid (-9) —  Still strong in 2013,  further cementing its place among the elite Fashion Capitals.
  15. Sao Paulo (-8)  — Again, the Queen of Latin American Fashion Capitals.
  16. St. Petersburg (+35)  —  Russian comes into 2014 with two Fashion Capitals in the Top Twenty, with Petrograd surprising  Moscow.   Read more

  The Global Language Monitor’s 10th Annual Survey

   The Difference between New York and Paris was 0.05%    And No. 4?  Los Angeles! Yes, LA. February Fashion Weeks, 2014 New York and Austin, Texas — New York has reclaimed the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital from London, which had held the tile for 2011 and 2012.  Paris, which also won the title of the Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture, finished in the No. 2 spot overall.  New York and Paris were separated by 0.05%, the closest in the 10-year history of the Global Language Monitor’s survey.   In another development, Los Angeles moved into the esteemed Big  Four status, moving up five spots from 2012.

Coming Later in 2014:  The Global Fashion Capital Institute

. The rest of the Top Ten included:  Barcelona, Rome, Berlin, Sydney, Antwerp, and Shanghai.    Berlin solidified its position, while Antwerp completed its steady climb, Sydney had a triumphal return, and Shanghai returns to what many consider its rightful place in the Top Ten.   Asia was well represented with Tokyo (11), Singapore (19), and Hong Kong (20) in the Top Twenty.  “New York City has, indeed, earned its Top Global Fashion Capital ranking through its disciplined, methodical yet creative approach to its fashion industry.” said Bekka Payack, New York-based Fashion Director for The Global Language Monitor.

Read Vanessa Friedman for a UK point of view.

“Paris, with the Top Haute Couture ranking, of course has a centuries-l, ng heritage, having invented the very concept, also scored highly in the pret-a-porter category.  This year’s rankings also demonstrate the creative energy that is emerging worldwide in terms of fashion as a jobs, income and wealth generator, not to mention the prestige associated with exporting your fashion sense to the world.”

 

Read About the Top US Fashion Economic Powerhouses in AtlanticCities

 

. The Top Global Fashion Capital Rankings are listed below, in the format:  Position, City, Change from 2012, and comment.

  1. New York (+1) — The Big Apple is back on top of the fashion world by slipping past Paris by .5%.
  2. Paris (+2) — The Top Global Fashion Capital for Haute Couture is surprisingly strong in pret-a-porter, also.
  3. London (-2) — London has enjoyed a fabulous two-year run and is now secure in its place in the top echelon for global fashion.
  4. Los Angeles (+5) — Zut alors! Tinsel Town in the Top Four? The result of the melding of the Red Carpet, the Industry (film, of course), and West Coast cool.
  5. Barcelona (-2)  —  Espana, again, places two Fashion Capitals in the Top Fifteen.  Barcelona also wins the Top Fashion Capital for Swimwear.
  6. Rome (0) — Rome may have Seven Hills but Italy now has Three Fashion Capitals (and Milan is No. 2).
  7. Berlin (+3)  — Berlin continues its steady rise moving deeper into the the elite ranks.
  8. Sydney (+7)  —  Sydney towers over OZ distancing (and distinguishing) itself, once again, from Melbourne.
  9. Antwerp (+2)  — Ah Antwerp, reverberations of the avant garde Antwerp Six continues into the 21st century.
  10. Shanghai (+12) —  As China further emerges onto the world stage, Shanghai leads the fashion charge.
  11. Tokyo (+9) — Tokyo made a leap in 2013 that many consider long overdue.
  12. Milano (-4)  —  Milan was the Top Global Fashion Capital back in 2009 and remains a strong contender for the top spot year-after-year.
  13. Florence (+3)  — Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli — A proud heritage to a thriving fashion industry in 2013.
  14. Madrid (-9) —  Still strong in 2013,  further cementing its place among the elite Fashion Capitals.
  15. Sao Paulo (-8)  — Again, the Queen of Latin American Fashion Capitals.
  16. St. Petersburg (+35)  —  Russian comes into 2014 with two Fashion Capitals in the Top Twenty, with Petrograd surprising  Moscow.   Read more




‘London’ is the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2013

First time a city has topped the ranking

The Sixth Annual Analysis by the Global Language Monitor

New York, February 21, 2013 –  The city of London has been named the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2013, in the Global Language Monitor’s sixth annual ranking. London breaks the two year chart topping by the Duchess of Cambridge.  London bested ‘high slits’ the look popularized by Angelina Jolie’s dramatic stance at the 2012 Oscars, followed by Textures, Nail Art, Top Knots. Leather,  Wedge Sneakers, Peek-a-boo,  Statement Sunglasses, and Au Natural rounded out the top ten. “It may come as a surprise to some that the former Kate Middleton does not top the Top Fashion Buzzwords list this year. After all  Kate lit the headlines for everything she wore (and even more so when forgetting to don her frocks).  However, she could not overcome the fashion behemoth she helped create:  London,” said Bekka Payack, Manhattan-based Fashion Director for GLM. “This season will serve to further liberate women the world over to dress fashionably, in any way these choose.”

  1. London — With the the Global Fashion Crown two years running, the Olympics, Kate Middleton, Stella McCartney, Kate Moss and a cast of thousands (even the flamboyant Boris Johnson, nothing has proven more worthy than London Town.
  2. High Slits — Angelina Jolie’s dramatic stance at the 2012 Academy Award ceremony was the largest meme ever tracked. thereafter high slits abound.
  3. Textures — For the fashion conscious it’s the feel and not just the look.
  4. Nail Art — Observing today’s nail art is akin to taking a stroll through MoMA, with the works in miniature.
  5. Top knots and fun buns — Hair buns have evolved from granny’s convenience to a post-Modern fashion statement.
  6. Leather — Everything and everywhere, including socks, pants, jackets, shirts, and various ‘unmentionables’.
  7. Wedge sneakers  — Chuck your oh-so-retro Chuck Taylors, wedge sneakers are now the thing.
  8. Peek-a-boo — Apparently, the catwalks have gotten the CBS Emmy memo — and peek-a-boo fashion abounds.
  9. Statement Sunglasses — All of a sudden, Google’s ‘enhanced reality ‘ sunglasses  are demur by catwalk standards.
  10. Au Natural — In the buff now has a much sought after ‘royal warrant’ directly from the Duchess of Cambridge.
  11. First Knuckle Rings —  Every few hundred years first knuckle rings return to the fashion forefront.
  12. Baby Bumps — First saw life with the ‘More Demi Moore’ Vanity Fair Cover in ’91.  Now a fashion statement.
  13. Blocking —  Fabric and Texture blocking; not just color blocking this time around
  14. Prints — Start with postage stamps and follow through to zig-zags, paisleys, and even stripes.
  15. Children as Fashion Accessories — Nothing new here but becoming ever more prominent in Tinsel Town.

Each autumn, the Global Language Monitor ranks the Top Global Fashion Capitals.  In 2012, London maintained its dominance over New York City as the Top Global Fashion Capital.  Following London and New York were Barcelona, Paris, and Madrid.  Rome, Sao Paulo, Milano, Los Angeles, and Berlin rounded out the top ten.

 




London Edges New York for Top 2012 Global Fashion Capital

Ninth Annual Ranking Now Includes Fifty-five Cities

September 6, 2012,  New York and Austin, Texas.   London has been crowned the Top Global Fashion Capital, edging out New York for the second year in a row, according to the Global Language Monitor’s annual ranking of the Top Fifty Fashion Capitals.  London and New York were followed by Barcelona, Paris and Madrid.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Rome, Sao Paulo, Milano, Los Angeles, and Berlin.

“London’s two-year run has been has been propelled by two rather extraordinary circumstances:  the emergence of the former Kate Middleton as a top fashion icon and the recent completion of what have been hailed as an extremely successful Summer Olympics,” said Bekka Payack, Manhattan-based Fashion Director of GLM.  “In recognition of the significance and growth of regional capitals with their distinctive styles and contributions to the fashion industry, GLM expanded the list to some fifty-five cities on five continents.”

Top movers on the plus side included Antwerp (+33), Caracas (+27), Johannesburg (+23), and Sao Paulo (+18).  Top movers on the down side include Mexico City        (-25), Toronto (-19), Moscow (-17), Chicago (-14), and Mumbai (-14), attesting to the heightened global competition.  Newcomers to this year’s analysis were Vancouver (31),  Seoul (34), Boston (44),  Houston (49), and St Petersburg, Russia (51).

Prior to London’s two year reign, New York had reclaimed the crown from Milan.  Previous to this, New York had been the top fashion capital for five years running, taking the crown from Paris.
The 2012 Top Global Fashion Capitals, with Rank, Previous Year’s Rank, and commentary:
1.   London (1) — Competitors stymied by Kate Middleton and now the hugely successful Summer Olympics.
2.   New York (2)– That toddling town is waiting in the wings for London to stumble.
3.   Barcelona (7) — Iberia rules with two fashion capitals in the Top Five.
4.   Paris (3)–  Topped ‘haute couture’ category, of course.
5.   Madrid (12)– Making a strong move toward the top.
6.   Rome (13)– Edging Milano this time out.
7.   Sao Paulo (25) — The Queen of Latin America, again.
8.   Milano (4) — Slipping a few spots, but never for long.
9.   Los Angeles (5) — The City of Angels strengthening its hold as a true fashion capital.
10.   Berlin (10) — Remains among the elite — and deservedly so.
11.   Antwerp (44) — A surprising large climb in a very short time (up 33 spots).
12.   Hong Kong (6) — Tops in Asia, though down six year over year.
13.   Buenos Aires (20) — Moving steadily upward.
14.   Bali (21) — Steady climb attests to it being more than just swimwear.
15.   Sydney (11) — Remains near the top, a few steps ahead of Melbourne, as is its wont.
16.   Florence (31) — A big move for Firenza (up 15).
17.   Rio de Janeiro (23) — Building toward the 2016 Summer Games.
18.   Johannesburg (41) — Jo-burg breaks into the Top Twenty.
19.   Singapore (8) — Trailing  Hong Kong but leading Tokyo and Shanghai.
20.   Tokyo  (9) — No longer the No, 5 to the Top Four, competition is aglow in Asia.
21.   Melbourne (17) — Still strong, still a few steps behind Sydney.
22.   Shanghai (14) — A thriving fashion center in a tough competitive arena.
23.   Caracas (50) — Tremendous upward movement for a seminal fashion center.
24.   Las Vegas (16) — Follow the money, and the money and the stars flow to Vegas.
25.   Monaco (15) — The principality is firmly ensconced in the European fashion firmament.
26.   Santiago (30) — A solid No. 5 in Latin America.
27.  Amsterdam (19) — Creative, original and a bit outre.
28.   Dubai (27) — A steady force in the mid-East ready to bloom further.
29.   Bangkok (32) — Struggling to gain ground in the region.
30.   Copenhagen (29) — Keeping pace with (and a bit ahead of) Stockholm.
31.   Vancouver (Debut) — Solid debut from this newcomer from the Pacific Northwest.
32.   Stockholm (28) — The Capital of Scandinavia’s influence is beginning to transcend its regional roots.
33.   Krakow (47) — A scrappy player wielding a surprising amount of influence.
34.   Seoul (Debut) — Korean fashion has now gained a foothold on the world scene.
35.   Moscow (18) — A bold and growing presence despite a stumble in the current analysis.
36.   Frankfurt (43) — Carving out its own space in Berlin’s towering shadow.
37.  Vienna (35) — Insight into 21st c. fashion emerging from ancient imperial venues.
38.  Mumbai (24) — Still leading New Delhi (now by 10 spots) to dominate the Subcontinent.
39.   Miami (26) — The fashion world beginning to understand Miami is more than swimwear.
40.  Abu Dhabi (42) — A steady climb backed by deep pockets.
41.   San Francisco (38) — A rising yet iconoclastic star.
42.   Austin (40) — Famous for its ‘Mash Up’ teams, the city propels its unique style forward.
43.   Warsaw (33) — Particularly influential in Central Europe.
44.   Boston (Debut) — Can New England deliver fashion to the world? Apparently so.
45.   Prague (48) —  A firm foundation in interpreting the traditional and the classic.
46.   Dallas (37) — Outdistances Houston to settle the local score.
47.   Mexico City (22) — Slips some twenty-five spots since the last report.
48.   New Delhi (39) — Striving for relevance on the global stage.
49.   Houston (Debut) — Big, bold and a city to watch.
50.   Chicago (36) — City of the Big Shoulders stretching out toward word-class fashion.
51.   St. Petersburg (Debut) — The former imperial capital making strides on the global fashion scene.
52.  Montreal (49) — Eclipsed by the debut of Vancouver but still a formidable force.
53.  Toronto (34) —  Nipped by its francophone neighbor to the North.
54.  Cape Town (46) — Though Jo-burg won the latest duel, Cape Town surely has plans.
55.  Atlanta (45) — Gaining an international reputation for its bold accents.
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This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 250,000 print and electronic news media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter) as they emerge.

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

 

Top Fashion Capitals by Region:

Europe (14):  London,  Barcelona, Paris, Madrid, Rome, Milano, Berlin, Antwerp, Florence, Monaco, Amsterdam,  Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Frankfurt.

Middle and Eastern Europe (6):  Krakow, Moscow, Vienna, Warsaw, Prague, and St Petersburg.

North America (13):  New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Vancouver, San Francisco, Austin, Boston, Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Montreal, Toronto, and Atlanta.

Asia (6):  Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Shanghai, Bangkok, and Seoul.

Subcontinent (2):  Mumbai, New Delhi,

Oceania (3):  Bali, Sydney, and Melbourne.

Latin America (6):  Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro,  Caracas, Santiago, and Mexico City.

Middle East and Africa (4):  Dubai, Johannesburg, Abu Dhabi, and Cape Town.

The world fashion trade  is estimated to be over three trillion USD.



Kate Middleton ‘Brand’ Tops London Olympics Sponsors in New Brand Affiliation Study

The Duchess Effect Meets the London Olympics

 

Kate previously helps London achieve Top Global Fashion Capital status

…  after toppling Lady Gaga for Top Fashion Buzzword

Kate Usurps London Olympics

Austin, Texas. May 17, 2012.  The Duchess Effect Meets the Summer Games, indeed.  According to the Global Language Monitor’s  London 2012 Ambush Marketing May 15 Update, even the Summer Games are encountering the Duchess Effect.  The GLM Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), when linked with London  2012, Kate Middleton had a closer brand affiliation that a number of top sponsors including Coke, Adidas, BA and Panasonic, among others.

This again demonstrates the power of the ‘Kate Middleton Brand’.  A Tier 1 Olympic sponsor pays about $160 million for the privilege, plus the attendant advertising fees promoting the relationship that can cost upwards of $500 million over the four-year arrangement.

This would suggest that the Kate Middleton Brand could be valued at nearly a billion dollars or more, just in relationship to Summer Games.

“This can be viewed as a two-edged sword for Sebastian Coe and the International Olympic Committee (IOC),” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor.  “On the one hand, the Duchess of Cambridge and her husband, are Olympic Ambassadors; on the other hand the Kate Middleton ‘brand scores’ higher that nearly half the paying sponsors, such as, Coke, Adidas, and BA, among many others.”

All perceived Olympic affiliations according to their presence in the global media and statistically linked to the London Games, qualify for GLM’s Ambush Marketing rankings.

The official Olympic sponsors are divided into three tiers: Worldwide Partners, Official Partners, and Official Supporters. GLM tracks over fifty non-affiliated companies that are direct competitors with the Official Olympic sponsors.

Earlier this year, the former Kate Middleton has already helped propel London to the Top Global Fashion Capital ranking for 2011 and was named the Top Fashion Buzzword for 2012 topping even Lady Gaga, the previous year’s winner.

The Official Olympic Mascots, Wenlock and Mandeville, fashioned from drops of steel, appear to pose little threat to Kate’s reign.

For these rankings, concluded on May 1, 2012, GLM measured the strength of the brand affiliation for each official Olympic sponsor against those of their primary non-affiliated competitors. Though ‘ambush marketing’ is well understood to mean an organization knowingly exploiting a brand affiliation with the Games without the benefit of official sponsorship.

GLM has been tracking the Olympics since the Athens Games in 2004 and ambush marketing since the Beijing Games in 2008.  For London 2012, GLM began tracking the three tiers of official sponsors since the third quarter of 2011.

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GLM also tracks the brand equity of the athletes before and during the Games.

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About Global Language Monitor:  “We Tell You What the Web is Thinking”

Customized GLM Ambush Marketing Rankings are released monthly up to and following London 2012.  The Ambush Marketing London 2012 May 15 Update report features dozens of charts representing the interrelationship of each company to the Olympic Brand, their competitors, and their partners. In addition, the reports contain exclusive and individualized Narrative Tracker analyses, the most advanced trend tracking analytics available. For more information, individualized reports, or a monthly subscription, call

+ 1 512 801 6823 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com.




Top 2012 Global Fashion Capitals

Eighth Annual Ranking

Presence of media favorites, Princess Kate and Alexander McQueen, Tip the Scales away from New York

Berlin and Singapore Break into the Top Ten;

New Delhi slips farther behind Mumbai as does Melbourne behind Sydney

August 21, 2011 NEW YORK and AUSTIN, Texas.   London has overtaken New York City as the Top Global Fashion Capital for 2011, the Global Language Monitor, announced today.  London and New York were followed by Paris, Milano, Los Angeles, and Hong Kong.  Barcelona, Singapore, Tokyo and Berlin rounded out the top ten.   New York had reclaimed the crown from Milan last year.  Previous to this, New York had been the top fashion capital for five years running.  Berlin and Singapore broke into the Top Ten for the first time.

“We are seeing what the impact of two genuine media stars, Princess Kate and Alexander McQueen can have upon a global ranking.  Our numbers show that it was their presence that tipped the victory to London over New York,” said Bekka Payack, the Manhattan-based fashion correspondent of the Global Language Monitor.  “In the various categories, London took top honors in three, while New York, Paris, and Sao Paulo each topped the field in one.

he list was expanded to fifty cities to recognize the growth of regional capitals with their distinctive styles and contributions to the fashion industry.  Top Movers on the plus side included Bali (+11), Rome (+9), Berlin (+8), Mexico City (+8), and Singapore (+7).  Top movers on the down side include Cape Town (-23), Prague (-22), and Miami (-19) and Jo-burg (-16), attesting to the heightened competition.

This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print, and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).

The words, phrases, and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage, and appearance in global media outlets.

This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print, and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).   The words, phrases, and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

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The Top Global Fashion Capitals for 2011, change from the previous ranking, and commentary follow.

Image courtesy of FashionFoieGras.com
Image courtesy of FashionFoieGras.com

2011 Ranking, City, Previous ranking, and Comment

  1. London (3) – Kate Middleton and Alexander McQueen help raise the City to No.1 status.
  2. New York (1) – New York is strong but London has Kate. ‘Nuff said.
  3. Paris (4) – No. 1 in our hearts but No. 3 in the media.
  4. Milano (6) – The Earth has returned to its proper orbit:  The Big Four once again occupy the top four spots.
  5. Los Angeles (5) – LA solidifying her hold on No. 5.
  6. Hong Kong (2) —   Down from No. 2 but tops again in Asia.
  7. Barcelona (10) – The Queen of the Iberian Peninsula. Once again.
  8. Singapore (15) – Up seven spots and into the Top Ten.
  9. Tokyo (14) – Third Asian city in the Top Ten.
  10. Berlin (18) – Completes a long climb into elite status.
  11. Sydney (7) – Drops a bit but leaves Melbourne in the dust.
  12. Madrid (11) – Iberia now has two cities firmly ensconced in the top echelon.
  13. Rome (22) – The Eternal City set the tone for fashion throughout the Empire for a millennium.  Today the tradition continues, though on a smaller scale.
  14. Shanghai (12) – Shanghai shines along with Hong Kong in the Middle Kingdom.
  15. Monaco (Debut) – The principality debuts at No. 15 more than doubling the ranking of the next newbie.
  16. Las Vegas (16) – Las Vegas and Monaco virtually tied on the Top Fashion Capitals ranking.
  17. Melbourne (9) – Though a top twenty fashion capital, slips a bit in its on-going battle with Sydney (No. 11).
  18. Moscow (20) – More billionaires (79) call it home than New York City and its continual move up the fashion rankings reflects it.
  19. Amsterdam (17) – Moves up two spots; now No. 10 in Europe.
  20. Buenos Aires (24) – Dramatic rise as she moves into the Top 20.
  21. Bali (32) – The world is discovering the allure that has been a quiet secret for centuries.
  22. Mexico City (29) — The vast metropolis now claims the No. 2 spot in Latin America.
  23. Rio de Janeiro (19) – Ever readying for the Summer Olympics, also strengthening its fashion knowhow beyond swimwear.
  24. Mumbai (28) – Mumbai is beginning to display the swagger of old Bombay.
  25. Sao Paulo (13) – A burgeoning fashion scene and a bustling fashion industry.
  26. Miami ( 8) – More than just swim- and leisure-wear town.
  27. Dubai (21) – Tops in its region but feeling the pressure from intense global competition.
  28. Stockholm (33) – Stockholm and Copenhagen both moving up in tandem.
  29. Copenhagen (34) – Up five on the rankings, as was Stockholm.
  30. Santiago (31) – A strong No. 5 in the Latin America region.
  31. Florence (Debut) – Firenza undergoing a Renaissance in 21st c. fashion.
  32. Bangkok (35) – Quietly moving up the rankings.
  33. Warsaw (36) – No. 2 in the Middle and Eastern European region.
  34. Toronto (38) – Now known for more than its fine Film Festival.
  35. Vienna (27) – This once Imperial City is staking 21st c. claim in its own right,
  36. Chicago (38) – City of the Big Shoulders stretching out toward word-class fashion.
  37. Dallas (40) – For Western Wear, please see Fort Worth.
  38. San Francisco (Debut) – Makes the list, like Austin, for it quirky, eclectic style.
  39. New Delhi (30) – A strong, emerging presence on the Global Fashion scene.
  40. Austin (Debut) – Eclectic? Outlandish? Even Green Fashion?  Austin has it all.
  41. Johannesburg (25) – Maturing fashion industry a boon to a city in transition.
  42. Abu Dhabi (Debut) – Attempting to break into the world of fashion at the highest ranks.
  43. Frankfurt (38) – Holding its own amidst a thriving European fashion scene.
  44. Antwerp (Debut) – The legend of old becomes the reality of today.  A fine debut.
  45. Atlanta (40) – Learning the ropes of competing globally, with a definitely Southern flair.
  46. Cape Town (23) – In the process of gaining ever more attention for a worthy effort.
  47. Krakow (38) – One of the world’s cultural treasures with a penchant for the eclectic.
  48. Prague  (26) –Bohemian fashion influence is moving into its 2nd millennium.
  49. Montreal (Debut) – A strong debut into the Top Fifty.
  50. Caracas (40) – Despite internal turmoil, fashion savvy can be hard to ignore.

 

Global Language Monitor Fashion Capitals from the Wikipedia

Top Fashion Capitals by Region:

Europe (12):  London, Paris, Milan, Barcelona, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Monaco, Amsterdam,  Stockholm, Copenhagen, Florence.

Middle and Eastern Europe (5):  Moscow, Warsaw, Vienna, Krakow, Prague.

North America (11):  New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Miami, Toronto, Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, Austin, Atlanta, Montreal.

Asia (5):  Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Shanghai, Bangkok,

Subcontinent (2):  Mumbai, New Delhi,

Oceania (3):  Sydney, Melbourne, Bali.

Latin America (6):  Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Santiago, Caracas.

The Middle East and Africa (4):  Dubai, Johannesburg, Abu Dhabi, Cape Town,

The world ‘rag’ business is estimated to be over three trillion USD.




London Overtakes New York as Top Global Fashion Capital

Eighth Annual Ranking

Presence of media favorites, Princess Kate and Alexander McQueen, Tip the Scales away from New York

Berlin and Singapore Break into the Top Ten

New Delhi slips farther behind Mumbai as does Melbourne behind Sydney

August 21, 2011 NEW YORK and AUSTIN, Texas.   London has overtaken New York City as the Top Global Fashion Capital for 2011, the Global Language Monitor, announced today.  London and New York were followed by Paris, Milano, Los Angeles, and Hong Kong.  Barcelona, Singapore, Tokyo and Berlin rounded out the top ten.   New York had reclaimed the crown from Milan last year.  Previous to this, New York had been the top fashion capital for five years running.  Berlin and Singapore broke into the Top Ten for the first time.

“We are seeing what the impact of two genuine media stars, Princess Kate and Alexander McQueen can have upon a global ranking.  Our numbers show that it was their presence that tipped the victory to London over New York,” said Bekka Payack, the Manhattan-based fashion correspondent of the Global Language Monitor.  “In the various categories, London took top honors in three, while New York, Paris, and Sao Paulo each topped the field in one.”

The list was expanded to fifty cities to recognize the growth of regional capitals with their distinctive styles and contributions to the fashion industry.  Top Movers on the plus side included Bali (+11), Rome (+9), Berlin (+8), Mexico City (+8), and Singapore (+7).  Top movers on the down side include Cape Town (-23), Prague (-22), and Miami (-19) and Jo-burg (-16), attesting to the heightened competition.

This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).

The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Narrative Tracking technology.  NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the 75,000 print and electronic media, as well as new social media sources (such as Twitter).   The words, phrases and concepts are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

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The Top Global Fashion Capitals for 2011, change from previous ranking, and commentary  follow.

Image courtesy of FashionFoieGras.com
Image courtesy of FashionFoieGras.com

2011 Ranking, City, Previous ranking, and Comment

  1. London (3) – Kate Middleton and Alexander McQueen help raise the City to No.1 status.
  2. New York (1) – New York is strong but London has Kate. ‘Nuff said.
  3. Paris (4) – No. 1 in our hearts but No. 3 in the media.
  4. Milano (6) – The Earth has returned to its proper orbit:  The Big Four once again occupy the top four spots.
  5. Los Angeles (5) – LA solidifying her hold on No. 5.
  6. Hong Kong (2) —   Down from No. 2 but tops again in Asia.
  7. Barcelona (10) – The Queen of the Iberian Peninsula. Once again.
  8. Singapore (15) – Up seven spots and into the Top Ten.
  9. Tokyo (14) – Third Asian city in the Top Ten.
  10. Berlin (18) – Completes a long climb into elite status.
  11. Sydney (7) – Drops a bit but leaves Melbourne in the dust.
  12. Madrid (11) – Iberia now has two cities firmly ensconced in the top echelon.
  13. Rome (22) – The Eternal City set the tone for fashion throughout the Empire for a millennium.  Today the tradition continues, though on a smaller scale.
  14. Shanghai (12) – Shanghai shines along with Hong Kong in the Middle Kingdom.
  15. Monaco (Debut) – The principality debuts at No. 15 more than doubling the ranking of the next newbie.
  16. Las Vegas (16) – Las Vegas and Monaco virtually tied on the Top Fashion Capitals ranking.
  17. Melbourne (9) – Though a top twenty fashion capital, slips a bit in its on-going battle with Sydney (No. 11).
  18. Moscow (20) – More billionaires (79) call it home than New York City and its continual move up the fashion rankings reflects it.
  19. Amsterdam (17) – Moves up two spots ; now No. 10 in Europe.
  20. Buenos Aires (24) – Dramatic rise as she moves into the Top 20.
  21. Bali (32) – The world is discovering the allure that has been a quiet secret for centuries.
  22. Mexico City (29) — The vast metropolis now claims the No. 2 spot in Latin America.
  23. Rio de Janeiro (19) – Ever readying for the Summer Olympics, also strengthening its fashion knowhow beyond swimwear.
  24. Mumbai (28) – Mumbai is beginning to display the swagger of old Bombay.
  25. Sao Paulo (13) – A burgeoning fashion scene and a bustling fashion industry.
  26. Miami ( 8) – More than just swim- and leisure-wear town.
  27. Dubai (21) – Tops in its region but feeling the pressure from intense global competition.
  28. Stockholm (33) – Stockholm and Copenhagen both moving up in tandem.
  29. Copenhagen (34) – Up five on the rankings, as was Stockholm.
  30. Santiago (31) – A strong No. 5 in the Latin America  region.
  31. Florence (Debut) – Firenza undergoing a Renaissance in 21st c. fashion.
  32. Bangkok (35) – Quietly moving up the rankings.
  33. Warsaw (36) – No. 2 in the Middle and Eastern European region.
  34. Toronto (38) – Now known for more than its fine Film Festival.
  35. Vienna (27) – This once Imperial City is staking a 21st c. claim in its own right,
  36. Chicago (38) – City of the Big Shoulders stretching out toward word-class fashion.
  37. Dallas (40) – For Western Wear, please see Fort Worth.
  38. San Francisco (Debut) – Makes the list, like Austin, for it quirky, eclectic style.
  39. New Delhi (30) – A strong, emerging presence on the Global Fashion scene.
  40. Austin (Debut) – Eclectic? Outlandish? Even Green Fashion?  Austin has it all.
  41. Johannesburg (25) – Maturing fashion industry a boon to a city in transition.
  42. Abu Dhabi (Debut) – Attempting to break into the world of fashion at the highest ranks.
  43. Frankfurt (38) – Holding its own amidst a thriving European fashion scene.
  44. Antwerp (Debut) – The legend of old becomes the reality of today.  A fine debut.
  45. Atlanta (40) – Learning the ropes of competing globally, with a definitely Southern flair.
  46. Cape Town (23) – In the process of gaining evermore attention for a worthy effort.
  47. Krakow (38) – One of the world’s cultural treasures with a penchant for the eclectic.
  48. Prague  (26) –Bohemian fashion influence is moving into its 2nd millennium.
  49. Montreal (Debut) – A strong debut into the Top Fifty.
  50. Caracas (40) – Despite internal turmoil, fashion savvy can be hard to ignore.

 

Global Language Monitor Fashion Capitals from the Wikipedia

Top Fashion Capitals by Region:

Europe (12):  London, Paris, Milan, Barcelona, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Monaco, Amsterdam,  Stockholm, Copenhagen, Florence.

Middle and Eastern Europe (5):  Moscow, Warsaw, Vienna, Krakow, Prague.

North America (11):  New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Miami, Toronto, Chicago, Dallas, San Francisco, Austin, Atlanta, Montreal.

Asia (5):  Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo, Shanghai, Bangkok,

Subcontinent (2):  Mumbai, New Delhi,

Oceania (3):  Sydney, Melbourne, Bali.

Latin America (6):  Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Santiago, Caracas.

Middle East and Africa (4):  Dubai, Johannesburg, Abu Dhabi, Cape Town,

The world ‘rag’ business is estimated to be over three trillion USD.




The Duchess Effect Top Fashion Buzzword of 2012




Top 15 HollyWORDS of The Year

HollyWords — Top Words of the Year from Films

WBAL, Baltimore, NBC Nightly News

Naturally, I’m way too uncreative and lazy to actually have come up with this list; it comes courtesy of the Global Language Monitor. I have no idea who they are or what they do, but I’m relatively sure they’ve put some severe sanctions on Sarah from Real World Philly, whose declarations of “How dare her!” plague my very soul. But for those of you want to see these top 15 words in action, I figured I’d be a benevolent soul and put ‘em to use in a sentence so you can get the gist on how to use ‘em correctly.

1. Pinot (Sideways): Recently, I compared myself to a pinot to try to show a waitress my “true self”; she suggested that unbuttered toast, being both bland and unpleasant, was a more appropriate metaphor.

2. Genius (Ray): The next film snob who tells me Lars Von Trier is a genius is going to be smacked…hard.

3. Hand Washing (Aviator, etc): I’ve tried obsessively hand washing for months, but I suspect I’ll always feel unclean ever since my hand accidentally grazed against a White Chicks DVD.

4. “Mo chuisle” (Million Dollar Baby): In Million Dollar Baby, Clint Eastwood was originally going to buy a robe for Hilary Swank that read “girlie tough” but since they were out he settled for Mo chuisle.

5. Gipper (The Knute Rockne Story): My theory is that James Brolin’s portrayal of The Gipper (Ronald Reagan), not pneumonia, was what led to his demise.

6. Neverland (Finding Neverland): Remember the good old days when Neverland conjured up images of boys refusing to grow up instead of…well…ewwww?

7. Antiquity (Troy, etc.): In the eyes of Roman Polanski, Lindsay Lohan is probably an antiquity by now.

8. OCD (The Aviator): The portrayal of people with OCD in transparent attempts to win an Oscar is going to be the wave of the future. The wave of the future. The wave of the future.

9. Girlie Men (Arnold): When Chris Rock implied that only girlie men watch the Oscars, he pretty much ensured that he was no longer going to be invited to Orlando Bloom’s Oscar parties.

10. Yo! (Garden State): Yo, Zach! I beg of thee, please tell me that Mandy freakin’ Moore is the one who makes you like you’re at a Motel 6 and not like you’re “home”?

11. Animation (Incredibles, etc.): Due to her excessive use of Botox, Nicole Kidman is no longer able to show any animation on her face whatsoever.

12. Snub (Giamatti, Saarsgard, etc): With this year’s snub of actors like Paul Giamatti, Peter Saarsgard, and Javier Bardem, the Academy continues to prove it’s about as good a judge of talent as anybody who publishes Michael Medved.

13. Small screen (Depp, DiCaprio, etc.: With flicks like Hitch and Welcome To Mooseport, isn’t it clear that we must ensure by any means necessary that stars of CBS comedies like Kevin James and Ray Romano need to stay on the small screen instead of further polluting the big one?

14. Frass (Sideways): The people who created this “relevant” list insist that the word frass from Sideways has profoundly influenced the English Language, but have you ever heard a person say this word? Ever?

15. Fahrenheit (Fahrenheit 9/11): I had a really good line I was going to use about a certain fella who’s not a fan of Fahrenheit 9/11, but I hear the weather in Guantanamo is unbearable this time of year.

Related tune: No More Words by Berlin (Windows Media via cdzlimited.org)

Some Useful Links

Truth: The Top Trending Global English Word for 2017 (#WOTY)

 

The Word Fake Rooted in Ethnic Slur Against Hindi and Muslim Holy Men

 Harvard Takes the Top Politically (In)correct Word of the Year Award for replacing House Master with Faculty Dean

 

June 6, 2017 (Update) Austin, TEXAS, and NEW YORK — The Global Language Monitor (GLM) today announced that Truth is the Word of the Year for 2017.  GLM also announced that the Global English Word of the Year for 2016 is not a word but a meme: the blood-soaked image of Omran Daqneesh, five years old, sitting in an ambulance while awaiting treatment in Allepo, Syria. (Click Here to see Top Global English Words of 2016.)

Covfefe, the Trumpian Typo heard ‘round the world, has crossed the threshold to make the 2017 #WOTY list, with some 400,000+ media citations alone.  At this moment, the word ranks at No. 12a between ‘wikileaks’ and ‘non-binary’.

 Rank

 2017 Words of the Year

1 Truth Let’s face it.  The conversation is all about truth, or lack thereof. Since the mid-’80s, citations of word truth are up some 40%
2 Narrative Narratives are replacing facts in politics
3 #Resist From Latin resistere, from re- + sistere to take a stand
4 Brexit British Exit from the European Union
5 Bigly Of considerable size, number, quantity, extent, or magnitude; large.
6 Nuclear Option In the US Senate, allowing confirmation of various political appointees with a simple majority vote
7 Nuclear Option (NK) The use of nuclear weapons by either side in the current North Korean standoff
8 MOAB GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast  AKA Mother Of All Bombs
9 Dumpster Fire According to Webster’s disastrously mishandled situation
10 Opioids More deaths than gun violence and automobiles combined
11 Latinx Neologism for Hispanic heritage of any stripe
12 Wikileaks Publishes secret information, news leaks, and classified media from anonymous sources.
13 Non-binary Gender identity defined as neither male nor female
14 Memory Care Euphemism for treating Alzheimer and other forms of dementia
15 Anthropocene The current geological time period where human activities have had a major environmental impact on the Earth.
16 Post-Truth Oxford: objective facts are less influential  than appeals to emotion or the narrative
17 Alt-right Alternative right, far-right groups that reject mainstream conservatism
18 ALT-Left Alternative Left, far-left groups that reject mainstream Liberalism
19 Populism Political movement claiming  to represent the interests of ordinary people against the elite and privileged
20 Safe Place Where students can retreat to avoid hearing unpleasant facts of the human condition
The Global Language Monitor © 2017, 2016 All Rights Reserved

 

During the last 18 months, the world of language in the Industrialized West reflected the turmoil undergoing much of the political systems throughout the Year 2016 and continuing into early 2017, said Paul JJ Payack, presdent and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor..

However, it would be a mistake to characterize this time with the World, as a whole, in turmoil. After all, having one nation exiting the EU block of some twenty-eight counties along with the the election of what by European Standards is a Center-Right government in the United States does not equate to 1914, 1939, 1968, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the on-going Middle East conflagration, and/or the emergence of China onto the world economic stage earlier this century, or even the Global Economic Restructuring of 2008 and what continues in its wake.

If you kept abreast of the daily press reports, you would think an outbreak of mass hysteria or at least amnesia had swept over the nations of the West. The world’s leading print and electronic media acted as if the concept of truth had been circumvented, or even, contravened, and sounded alarm after alarm that what we all knew as facts were no longer discernible. The source of this disruption in the news cycle, of course, was what came to be known as fake news and post-truth.

As the various organizations that announced their particular choices for their Words of the Year (WOTY), 2016 had the dubious distinction of being labeled a ‘dumpster-fire’ by the American Dialect Society thereby furthering the concept of fake news. How else could a phrase that was scarcely uttered anywhere in the world in 2016 be chosen for this ‘honor’?

For historical comparisons of a number of the terms used in this analysis, GLM used the Google Ngram Viewer.   You can use the Ngram Viewer to chart frequencies of comma-delimited search strings.  The Google Ngram Viewer uses yearly counts from sources printed between 1500 and 2008, though in some cases later dates of publications are included.

In the first example, frequencies of citations between and among a number of words used to describe the Top Words of the Year for 2016 are plotted between 1940 and the present.

Figure 1. Relative Frequency of citations among words used to describe the Top Words of the Year for 2016

Figure 2. Close-up on Relative Frequency Among Some Top Words of the Year for 2016

Figure 3.  Comparisons for the Words Truth Vs. Lie Since 1740

This is why early in the century, the Global Language Monitor put into place a methodology that clearly states that each considered word or phrase must adhere to the published criteria (see below). The methodology calls for words and phrases from the entire global English linguasphere to be considered, as well as each fulfilling geographic and demographic requirements. This automatically excludes the lists created by those organizations that rely on polls and other such non-scientific tools

A Methodology Optimized for the Wired World -- GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now approaches some 2.38 billion people, who use the language as a first, second, business language. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria: 1) found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography. The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

Global Language Monitor began to use newly available technologies to document the Words of the Year for Global English at the turn of the 21st century, with the idea to encapsulate and capture the essence of the preceding twelve months in a sort of linguistic amber.

Consider for a moment that fact that in 2009 GLM named ‘twitter’ as the Global English Word of the Year, not only as a social media phenomenon but as a potential Weapon of Mass Disruption (or even destruction). Witness: 1) the Arab Spring and 2) the actions of one Donald J. Trump.

Political Correctness

In a time so debilitated by the specter of political correctness (both from the left and the right), it seems rather demeaning to advance the concept of ‘fake news’, once you study its etymology, tracing back the origins of the word ‘fake’.

Cambridge Dictionaries’ definition of fakir: A Muslim (or, loosely, a Hindu) religious ascetic who lives solely on alms. Origin: Early 17th century: via French from Arabic faqīr. Fakir, Arabic Faqīr (“poor”), originally, a mendicant dervish. In mystical usage, the word fakir refers to man’s spiritual need for God, who alone is self-sufficient. Although of Muslim origin, the term has come to be applied in India to Hindus as well.

Fakirs are generally regarded as holy men who are possessed of miraculous powers, such as the ability to walk on fire or to subsist by looking only at the face of God.

In a Languagelog posting by Mark Liberman, How Fakirs Became Fakers, Edmund Wilson comments (from the grave) that Fakirs began to become entwined with fakers with a common usage that arose out of the American spiritualism craze of the 19th century.  This is where one can witness the shift in meaning for the word fakir, from an Islamic religious ascetic to the Hindu “Yogi,” to a sort of street corner or carnival barker or “producer of illusions”.

In other words ‘fake news” joins a long list of ethnic slurs that have imbued American English since before the founding of the republic. They are too many to repeat. However the most common of these might be ‘ethnic-group’ giver’ or ‘ethnic-group rich’. Specifically, using the term fake news could be said to humiliate and/or cast aspersions upon Muslim and/or Hindu holy men. Recent searches of the New York Times found 869 instances of ‘fake news,’ while searches of The Washington Post found 1,352. None mentioned the historical dubiousness of the practice.

You can see this linguistic shift peaking around 1940 and continuing to this day.

Figure 4. Shift in Meaning Between Fakir and Faker During the 1940s

In retrospective, even the whole idea of fake news and post-truth is a bit of an over-reaction. The organizations that were disrupted the most by the appearance of unchecked, non-verifiable and inadequately sourced stories, were those upon which the world came to rely and depend upon to safeguard the information delivered to their audiences as verifiably true. To continue in these roles as stewards of truth, it was incumbent upon them to put into place new methods of testing information.

The unvarnished truth is that the dominant news gathering and distribution organizations fell behind the curve as sources of information multiplied by orders of magnitude. Neither did they comprehend the astonishingly rapid advances in computing power. Finally, the evolution of communication and social media tools advanced far more quickly than the old line media’s ability to adapt to and absorb them.

Decades of reporting on the decline of the US manufacturing base never seemed to register to old media as applicable lessons for themselves. In the mid-’80s, an HBS case study inquired as to which fared better — companies with strategic plans in place or those that had none. The answer: a dead heat. Apparently, companies without strategic plans were able to adjust more quickly to changing market conditions while companies with strategic plans all too often, steadfastly rode these plans straight into oblivion.  (For more information on this phenomenon, check ou the first two editions of In Search of Excellence.  Prepare to be shocked.)

What is Truth?

The debate over what is truth has been ongoing since the search for an ‘honest man’ by Diogenes the Cynic, the dialogues of Socrates as recorded by Plato, the Confessions of Augustine, the Summa of Aquinas, and the monastic scriptoria of Medieval Europe.

In the scriptoria of the Middle Ages, an elaborate system was constructed to ensure that no discrepancies were introduced into Scripture or highly-prized scholarly works — before the coming of movable type and the printing press. Can you imagine the decibel level of a discussion that played out over the misrepresentation of a single iota when dealing with the work of a Church Father, the Apostle Peter (or Paul), or the words of the Lord himself? This, of course, was complicated by the fact that there were few grammatical rules, little or no punctuation, no spaces between and among words, nor between sentences or paragraphs, and the like.

Even the late 17th and early 18th centuries, Harvard and Yale engaged in the same sort of tussle about the owner of Truth as the Right and Left are engaged in today.  Harvard chose the Latin word Veritas (Truth) on its official seal, while Yale considered the matter closed by adding Lux et Veritas.  (Light and Truth) to its own shield.  Three hundred years later, in an academic world perhaps overly concerned with political correctness, Harvard won top honors for the Top Politically (in)Correct Word of 2016.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us.

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the tsunami washing over the planet at an ever-quicker pace. Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t changed at all. It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality: News now emanates at the speed of thought, from tens of thousands or, even, millions of sources.

Can you imagine the uproar in the monastic world when documents would be would be produced with little or no vetting against the time-honored standards?

In 2008 GLM published an article, “Is Merriam-Webster its own Best Frenemy,” where we noted that its newest additions to its Collegiate Dictionary, were older than most entering college students at the time (28 years vs 18!)  Indeed, for the most part, technology could solve most of the Post-truth and Fake News phenomena.

Since the turn of the 21st century, the Global Language Monitor (GLM) has named the Top Words of Global English. A decade earlier, the American Dialect Society began to name the Word of The Year for mostly American (and a bit of British) English with little or no use of the then emerging computer power. By the end of the first decade of the 21st Century, the BBC chose the Global Language Monitor to determine the Top English Words of the Decade worldwide while they chose an UK-based Linguist to highlight those of the UK.

One of the most surprising trends in the evolution of the Words of the Year over the last two decades is that they have become decidedly more parochial, and more trivial, as the century has progressed. Now there are about a dozen players, all competing for the same space, so the race has been one of dumbing down the various nominees and ultimate winner in an apparently. desperate in their attempt to seek the lowest common denominator, or even worse, to optimize entertainment value.

Perhaps most surprising of all is the apparent lack of preparation by the venerable incumbent organizations responsible for gathering, sifting through, and certifying information that then qualifies as verifiably newsworthy.

Apocalyptic language has been widely cited as word of the year worthy for the last several years — and rightly so. In fact, Apocalypse and Armageddon took Global Language Monitors’ honors as Top Global English Words of 2012. And though GLM’s proprietary algorithms have displayed a predictive element, it’s entirely possible that Apocalyptic language did indeed peak some five years too soon.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print, and electronic media, as well as the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801-6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Apocalyptic language has been widely cited as word of the year worthy for the last several years — and rightly so. In fact, Apocalypse and Armageddon took Global Language Monitors’ honors as Top Global English Words of 2012. And though GLM’s proprietary algorithms have displayed a predictive element, it’s entirely possible that Apocalyptic language did indeed peak some three years too soon.

The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century

2016:
Top Words:  No. 1  Truth, No. 2  Narrative, No. 3, #Resist
Top Phrases:   No. 1  Make America Great Again No. 2 When they go low, we go high No. 3 The Electoral College
Top Names:   No. 1 Donald Trump, No. 2 Vladimir Putin, No. 3 Neil Gorsuch
2015:
Top Words:  No. 1  Microaggression
Top Phrases:   No. 1 Migrant Crisis
Top Names:   No. 1 Donald J. Trump
2014:
Top Words:  No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love) , No. 2 Hashtag , No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases:   No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot;  No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names:   No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War I
2013:
Top Words: No. 1  ’404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA
2012:
Top Words: No. 1 ApocalypseArmageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping
2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima
2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama
2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama
2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps
2007:
Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore
2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur
2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God
2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove
2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya
2002:
Top Word: Misunderestimate
Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)
2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros
2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

 

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Backstory to, and Map of, the Re-Federalised United States, AD 2076

The Back Story to The Re-Federalised United States (RFUS) in AD 2076

Warning: Do not post until AD 2076

Austin, Texas Federation, November  3, 2076 — As a public service GLM (Galactic Language Monitor), nee the Global Language Monitor) provides this overview on the birth of the Re-Federalised United States.

re-federated-united-states-2014

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.”  said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.  “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15 year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond?

The ‘Re-Federalists’ convinced the majority of the US electorate to call a Constitutional Convention after decades of  hat came to be called ‘the Great Gridlock’.

In the aftermath, the US was ‘re-federalised’ into fourteen ‘Federations,’ the former District was made into a politics-free ‘National Monument’. And the federal government moved into the range of Thomas Jefferson’s early estimates (extrapolated from thirty or forty into some 300,000 employees), who were equally divided among the Fourteen Federations.

The new federations were more politically, culturally and economically united, so the so-called “culture wars” of the 21st C. quickly faded away.

Another interesting note:  VanCity and British Columbia, and ScotsLand, of the former United Kingdom were both annexed by the RFUS, without apparent opposition.

This also lit the economic engines of most of the new states, the the US Federation jumped into a sizable lead economically over China, again.  However, China re-captured its lead as the world’s top economy later in the 21st c. and into the 22nd.

About the Galactic Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

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Covfefe Now Validated as an English-language Word

Austin, Texas, June 6, 2017  — According to the Global Language Monitor, Covfefe has been validated as an English-language word.  This according to the methodology established early in the 21st century by GLM.  Earlier today, a simple Google search resulted in some 17,000,000 citations, with close to 500,000 news stories. Baidu, the Chinese ‘Google-equivalent’ also produced a cascading number of  Covfefe-related citations

‘Covfefe’ Now Validated as an English-language Word

 

According to Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst for GLM, “The Global Language Monitor put into place this ‘Optimized for the Wired World’ methodology that can test new words and phrases from the entire global English linguasphere. To be considered, the word must fulfill global, as well as geographic and demographic requirements. Covfefe met these criteria earlier today.

 

A Methodology Optimized for the Wired World -- GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now approaches some 2.38 billion people, who use the language as a first, second, business language. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria: 1) found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography. The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.

President George W. Bush was a most prodigious neologism-maker, ‘Misunderestimate’ was his all-time list topper.  See our Coverage  (covfefe) of Bushisms at the time.

Global Language Monitor also uses these newly available technologies to document the Words of the Year for Global English, with the idea to encapsulate and capture the essence of the preceding twelve months in a sort of linguistic amber.

Accordingly, GLM has updated its Top Trending Words of 2017 (#WOTY2017) to include ‘covfefe’.  Covfefe currently occupies the No. 12A position between No. 12 ‘wikileaks,’ and No. 13, ‘Non-binary,’  as to the definition of the word, there are any number of contenders swirling about. Most seem to revolve about various SpellCheck suggestions: such as  Coffee, Coif, kerfuffle, and, of course, coverage.

Global Language Monitor (Click here for About)

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com, tweet to @languageMonitor or skype pauljjpayack.

 

 

Bushisms

Mission Accomplished Sign is Posted on all USN Ships Returning to San Diego After Oversea Tours

‘Misunderestimate’ Tops List of All-Time Bushisms  

Compendium of Fifteen of the President’s ‘Greatest Hits’

 

Austin, TX January 9, 2009  – The Top All-Time Bushisms were released earlier today by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com). Topping the List were:

  • Misunderestimate,
  • Mission Accomplished,
  • Brownie, you’ve done a heck of a job!
  • I’m the decider, and
  • I use the Google.

 “The era of Bushisms is now coming to an end, and word watchers worldwide will have a hard time substituting Barack Obama’s precise intonations and eloquence for W’s unique linguistic constructions,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “The biggest linguistic faux pas of the Obama era thus far involves the use of the reflexive pronoun myself.  This is a refreshing shift from the Bush years.”

The rankings were nominated by language observers the world over and then ranked with the help of the Global Language Monitor’s PQI (Predictive-quantities Indicator).  The PQI is a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere.

The Top All-time Bushisms with commentary, follow.

1.     Misunderestimate. Stated in the immediate aftermath of the disputed 2000 election:  One of the first and perhaps most iconic Bushisms (Nov. 6, 2000).

2.     Mission Accomplished:  Never actually stated by the President but nevertheless the banner behind him was all that was needed to cement this phrase into the public imagination (May 1, 2003).

3.     “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” said to soon-to-be-discharged FEMA director Michael Brown. Stated in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; it came to symbolize the entire debacle (Sept. 2, 2005).

4.     “I’m the decider” came to symbolize the ‘imperial’ aspects of the Bush presidency.  Said in response to his decision to keep Don Rumsfeld on as the Secretary of Defense (April 18, 2006).

5.     “I use The Google” said in reference to the popular search engine (October 24, 2006).

6.     Iraq Shoe Throwing Incident.  In Iraq, throwing a shoe is a symbol of immense disrespect.  Some have suggested this to be the visual equivalent of a spoken Bushism — Inappropriate, surprising, embarrassing yet compelling to repeat (December 14, 2008).

7.     ”I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully” came to symbolize the President’s environmental policy (Sept. 29, 2000).

8.     ”You work three jobs? … Uniquely American, isn’t it? I mean, that is fantastic that you’re doing that.” Critics used this to symbolize Bush’s detachment to the plight of the working class, said to a divorced mother of three in Omaha, Nebraska (Feb. 4, 2005)

9.     ”Rarely is the questioned asked: Is our children learning?” was uttered before the first primaries back in 2000 (Jan. 11, 2000).

10.  ”Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we” was cited by his critics as revealing his true thoughts (Aug. 5, 2004)

11.   It was not always certain that the U.S. and America would have a close relationship.”  The President was speaking of the Anglo-American relationship (June 29, 2006).

12.  ”See, in my line of work you got to keep repeating things over and over and over again for the truth to sink in, to kind of catapult the propaganda.” Explaining his Communications strategy (May 24, 2005).

13.  “I think I may need a bathroom break. Is this possible?” scribbled on a note to Secretary of State Condi Rice during a UN Security Council meeting in 2005.

14.  “When the final history is written on Iraq, it will look just like a comma” (September 24, 2006).

15.  “Stay the course” was stated on numerous occasions during the course of the Iraq War.  Bush’s change of course with the Surge, actually made a dramatic difference in the conflict.

Others under consideration:  Stratergy and “Make the Pie Higher”.

Other Presidents of the United States created their own words, some of which have entered the standard English vocabulary.  These include:

  • ADMINISTRATION (George Washington)
  • BELITTLE (Thomas Jefferson)
  • BULLY PULPIT (Theodore Roosevelt)
  • CAUCUS (John Adams)
  • COUNTERVAILING (Thomas Jefferson)
  • HOSPITALIZATION (Warren G. Harding)
  • MUCKRAKER (Theodore Roosevelt)
  • NORMALCY (Woodrow Wilson)
  • O.K.(Martin Van Buren)
  • SANCTION (Thomas Jefferson)

About The Global Language Monitor

Austin-Texas-based Global Language Monitor analyzes and catalogues the latest trends in word usage and word choices, and their impact on the various aspects of culture, with a particular emphasis upon Global English.  For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

Top Bushisms of 2006:

I’m the decider’ and ‘I use The Google’ Top Annual List

Flashback: ‘Brownie, You’re Doing a Heck of a Job’ Was Tops for ‘05

San Diego, California (January 22, 2007) The Top Bushisms for 2006 were released earlier today by the Global Language Monitor. Topping the ‘06 List were “I’m the decider“ referring to his rejection of the request from seven former generals for Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to step down and “I use The Google,” in reference to the popular search engine. The rankings were nominated by language observers the world over and then ranked with the help of the Global Language Monitor’s PQI (Predictive-quantities Indicator).

“With fewer that twenty-four months remaining in the Bush presidency, word watchers worldwide are in a mad scramble to find a substitute for the near weekly faux pas presented by the president,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor.

The PQI is a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets.

The Top Bushisms of 2006 with Commentary Follow.

1. “I’m the Decider.” “I’m the decider, and I decide what is best. And what’s best is for Don Rumsfeld to remain as the secretary of defense.” Some six months later, Rumsfeld was cited as one of the major reasons for the “thumpin’” (Bush’s word) the Republicans received in the Mid-term elections. April 18th.

2. “I use The Google,” in reference to the popular search engine. October 24th. Interview with Maria Bartiromo of CNBC.

3. “It was not always certain that the U.S. and America would have a close relationship.” June 29th.

4. “I’ve got an ek-a-lec-tic reading list.” August 29th Interview with Brian Williams.

5. “The only way we can win is to leave before the job is done.” November 24th (Greely, Colorado)

6. “Stay the course.” On numerous occasions.

7. “When the final history is written on Iraq, it will look just like a comma.” September 24th. Interview with Wolf Blitzer of CNN.

8. “The Congress was right to renew the Terrorist Act.” In reference to the Patriot Act. September 7th. (Washington, DC)

9. “I want to be a war president; no president wants to be a war president.” October 26th. (Des Moines)

10. “The fiscal year that ended on February the 30th.” The government fiscal year ends on September 30th; there actually was a February 30 (and 29th) before the Emperors Julius Caesar and Augustus Caesar added the days to their namesake months: July and August. October 11th (Washington, DC)

The Top Bushisms of 2005 Topping the ‘05 List were: “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” said to since-disgraced FEMA director Michael Brown; “In my line of work you’ve got … to kind of catapult the propaganda” explaining his Communications strategy; and “I think I may need a bathroom break. Is this possible?” scribbled on a note to Secretary of State Condi Rice during a UN Security Council meeting.

As War Evolves so Does Language

By Andrew Ratner, The Baltimore Sun

Mission accomplished’ has now become synonymous with miscalculations

Baltimore, May, 2006 — When Synthia Laura Molina tried to drum up clients for her health-management consulting firm, the reaction often was not what she anticipated. Did you consider changing the name of your business, customers would ask. Eventually, Molina and her associates felt they had no choice but to do so. Its former name: Mission Accomplished.

When you told people the name, their initial reaction was ‘Oh, really.’ It was clear that the company name had been eroded, the company brand had been eroded,” said Molina, whose venture is known now as Central IQ. “My sense was it was so damaged, it may take a generation to lose that association.”Maybe a political group would want to buy it?,” she wondered. “Mission accomplished,” a military phrase, long ago became part of common jargon to describe a job well done. But the term took a turn for the worse after May 1, 2003.That was the day President Bush declared an end to major fighting in Iraq. He did so in front of a red, white and blue banner that proclaimed “Mission Accomplished” on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln off the Southern California coast.The power and authority of the phrase, at least in civilian usage, has since toppled like a dictator’s statue in Baghdad.

On a long list of unintended consequences and significant costs of the Iraq war, the erosion of “mission accomplished” from a widely used term of affirmation to one of miscalculation isn’t terribly significant. But it illustrates that vocabulary is shifting and organic and that overly declarative statements are probably best avoided, especially by presidents. “Rhetoric invites you to be assertive, and sometimes it’s our undoing,” said Martin Medhurst, a communications professor at Baylor University who previously directed the study of presidential rhetoric at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. “It’s like Nixon’s proclamation, ‘I’m not a crook,’ ultimately becomes the tagline for being a crook.” The term “mission accomplished” evolved in military use during World War II, usually in the context of a successful flight operation such as a strafing run or photo reconnaissance - technically a “mission,” according to A. Marjorie Taylor’s The Language of World War II in 1944. Eventually, its use became so common - and benign - it could be found on everything from plumbing tips to recipes. But during the past three years, the term has all but vanished from non-political use, particularly in the U.S. media. A search of the electronic library LexisNexis showed that the phrase is now mostly confined to references on sports pages and occasionally in news stories unrelated to war and politics in publications outside the United States. “The top references are jokes, blogs and insults. Ninety percent are negative or humorous,” said Paul Payack, who runs the Global Language Monitor in San Diego. “It’s a tagline that evokes not a smart thing to do, stepping into a trap, exactly what not to do at an apparent moment of triumph. Like ‘wardrobe malfunction,’ it just has become part of the public consciousness.”

Payack analyzes changes in the use of the words and phrases on the Internet - often, he said, for corporate clients and investors looking to track trends in the marketplace. With the use of algorithms, he has concluded, among other things, that the English language had 988,968 words as of last week and that “OK” is the most frequently spoken word on Earth.

But for all the unusual stuff that he comes across, he said he marveled at what has happened to “mission accomplished” in three years of its ricocheting around cyberspace. In 2003, the year the Iraq war began, the term “mission accomplished” appeared 375,000 times on the Internet. In 2004, it appeared 500,000 times. By 2005, it was more than 1 million. Are missions being accomplished twice as fast as before? Hardly. Payack said the phrase has assumed a new life in political reporting and elsewhere as shorthand for “grabbing defeat from the jaws of victory.” A humor blog last fall read, “Bush declares ‘mission accomplished’ in New Orleans.” The “mission accomplished” event has contributed to the president’s plunge in popularity. In 2003, Bush’s name was linked to the phrase on the Internet 30,000 times, Payack said. That rose to 50,000 in 2004, 75,000 in 2005 and 60,000 times in the first three months alone of 2006. The president’s father, George H.W. Bush, was himself ridiculed after overplaying his hand as president with “Read my lips: No new taxes,” but that was before the rise of the commercial Internet, which sustains and amplifies the missteps, said Nancy Snow, a communications professor at California State University, Fullerton. “‘Mission accomplished’ is so uniquely American, the sense of being overconfident,” Snow said. “I can see why they took advantage of that day, but as I watched that play out, I just had a sinking feeling.” Among the most frequent variations of “mission accomplished” that turned up in an electronic library search were words spoken in 2003 by then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer shortly before the president’s declaration: • “I’m not going to be able to shed any more light on when the president will say the mission is accomplished.” - April 13, 2003. • “At the appropriate time, when the president is ready, the president will have more thoughts to share with the nation about the mission, what was accomplished in the mission.” - April 27, 2003. Fleischer, who left the White House job in July 2003 and now runs his own corporate communications consulting firm in Westchester County, N.Y., said in a telephone interview that Bush’s use of the phrase that spring was unavoidable after the statue of Saddam Hussein was pulled down by Iraqis and U.S. Marines in central Baghdad’s Firdos Square. “Between April 6th, when the statue fell, and May 1, I was pummeled with questions by reporters, including ‘Is he trying to stretch this out for political reasons?’” Fleischer said. “One hour after the statue came down, the press was asking, ‘Why hasn’t Bush declared the war over yet?’” Fleischer, who was with the president on the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln, maintained that the sign was hung by someone on the ship, not by the White House. The Navy disputed that it had posted the banner in various press accounts. Bush also never actually said the words “mission accomplished” May 1 on the aircraft carrier. He actually said the opposite. “Our mission continues,” he told the crew. “Al-Qaida is wounded, not destroyed.” Afterwards, however, the president could hardly have said, “Read my lips: I didn’t say ‘mission accomplished.’” The stagecraft of the event - including the president’s arrival in a green flight jumpsuit in the co-pilot’s seat of a Navy S-3B Viking as it made a dramatic “tailhook” landing - was purposeful, audacious and meant to send the message that the “Mission Accomplished” sign succinctly conveyed. Too succinctly, it turned out, for both the president and the status of the phrase itself. “On May 1, 2003, it was a powerful and accurate metaphor that played to the president’s benefit, and as events grew worse, it was a powerful metaphor that played to the detriment of the president,” Fleischer said. “In retrospect, the sign was too declarative, while the president’s words were accurately subtle. It all got undone because of all the post-war problems we’ve had.” andrew.ratner@baltsun.com Copyright © 2006, The Baltimore Sun

Top Bushisms for 2005

Heckova job, Brownie”

San Diego,California (December 30, 2005) The Top Bushisms for 2005 were released earlier today by the Global Language Monitor. The rankings were based on the Global Language Monitor’s PQ (Predictive-quantities) Index. Topping the ‘05 List were “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” said to since-disgraced FEMA director Michael Brown; “In my line of work you’ve got … to kind of catapult the propaganda” explaining his Communications strategy; and “I think I may need a bathroom break. Is this possible?” scribbled on a note to Secretary of State Condi Rice during a UN Security Council meeting. “The Global Media are continually fascinated by the Bushisms phenomenon,” said Paul JJ Payack, President of the Global Language Monitor. “In fact, President George W. Bush has provided the literary- and linguistic-minded a plethora of interesting turns of phrase over the last five years. Of course, his supporters use his frank, shoot from the hip manner of speaking as proof of Bush as a decisive man of action. This contrasts sharply, so they believe, with the precisely turned phrases of the loyal opposition that might be pleasing to the ear but lead to little or no action, compromise on the world stage or, even, worse.” The PQ (Predictive-quantities) Index is a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. The Top Bushisms for 2005 follow: 1. “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.” To FEMA director Michael Brown, who resigned 10 days later amid criticism over his handling of the Hurricane Katrina recovery efforts. Mobile, Alabama, Sept 2, 2005 2. “See, in my line of work you got to keep repeating things over and over and over again for the truth to sink in, to kind of catapult the propaganda.” Explaining his Communications strategy. Greece, N.Y., May 24, 2005 3. “I think I may need a bathroom break. Is this possible?” A note to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice during a U.N. Security Council meeting. September 14, 2005 4. “This notion that the United States is getting ready to attack Iran is simply ridiculous. And having said that, all options are on the table.” Brussels, Belgium, Feb. 22, 2005 5. “In terms of timetables, as quickly as possible - whatever that means.” On his timeframe for Social Security Legislation. Washington D.C., March 16, 2005 Bonus: “Those who enter the country illegally violate the law.” On Illegal Immigrants or Undocumented Workers Tucson, Ariz., Nov. 28, 2005

A Note on Bushisms

Other presidents have shared the same perception of linguistic ineptitude, including Andrew Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, and Harry S. Truman. Though Jackson was considered the ultimate back-county rube, he oversaw the fall of the aristocracy and the rise of the common man; Lincoln, thought to be a Bible-spouting baboon, is now considered one of the greatest leaders the world has ever produced; and Truman, the uneducated haberdasher, laid the basic political foundation of the Post-Modern world, which is only now yielding to, well, the post Post-Modern world (whatever that may be). This is not to say that linguistic ineptness invariably leads to greatness. History shows us that we’ve had our fill of verbally challenged chief executives who were also severely overtaxed by the burdens of office and have now fallen most ungraciously into the various dustbins of failed expectations. And then there was Warren G. Harding. He is said to have scandalously coined the term ‘hospitalization’ in the 1920s. A quick Google search shows that the word now appears on the web more than 8 million times. Well done, Warren! Not a bad legacy for a third-rate president. Like the ‘Yogi-isms’ of Baseball Hall of Famer Lawrence P. “Yogi” Berra, some of Bush’s most famous Bushisms can be found in literature many years before he supposedly coined them. ‘Resignate’ dates to the 18th century, and ‘Grecian’ as a reference to things Greek was the preferred way to describe those inhabiting the Greek Isles from the 18th century onward. Even ‘Misunderestimate’ can be found in 1960’s literature.

Farewell to Letterman

Top Ten Words of 2010 on Letterman

Over the years the Global Language Monitor and David Letterman have crossed paths a number of times.  This Top Ten List send-up remains among our favorites!




EMOJI: Global Word of the Year for 2014

 

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Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me! — GLM and Bushisms

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And Finally the Top Global English Word of the Year 2016, and it’s not a word … But rather an Image (actually, a Meme!)

 

The world of language in the Industrialized West reflected the turmoil undergoing much of the political systems throughout the Year 2016 and continuing into early 2017.  However, it would be a mistake to characterize 2016 as a year with the World, as a whole, in Turmoil.  After all, having one nation exiting the EU block of some twenty-eight counties along with the the election of what by European Standards is a Center-Right government in the United States does not equate to 1914, 1939, the emergence of China onto the world economic stage earlier this century, or even the Global Economic Restructuring of 2008 and what continues to in its wake.

Since the Global Language Monitor began to use the newly available techniques and technologies to document the Words of the Year for Global English at the turn of the 21st century, the tumult of the preceding twelve months can be put into a more or less shocking perspective.  After all, in 2009  GLM named ‘twitter’ as the Global English Word of the Year, not as a social media phenomenon but as a potential Weapon of Mass Disruption (or even destruction). Witness, one President Trump.

And even the whole idea of fake news and post-truth is a bit of an over-reaction. Of course, there needs to be put into place new methods of testing information.  Perhaps one of the oldest scholarly methods could be updated to the present day — with all information being checked against ‘original sources’.

The debate over what is news and what is truth has been ongoing since the dialogues of Plato, the monastic scriptoria of Medieval Europe, where an elaborate system was constructed to ensure that no discrepancies were introduced into Scripture or highly-prized scholarly works — before the coming of movable type and the printing press. Can you imagine the decibel-level of a discussion tha played out over the misrepresentation of a single letter when dealing with the work of a Church Father, the Apostle Peter (or Paul), or the Word of  The Lord Himself?

There is the sense that we are witnessing an unprecedented historical event; historical in the sense that we now appear to be standing astride (or atop) a cusp in history, a delta, a decision point, what is now called a point of inflection or inflection point.

Watching the nightly news and reading the traditional (for the last two centuries, that is) media, one has the distinct sense that what they perceive as unprecedented almost chaotic circumstances is actually that of the normalcy of the new reality, that of communications at the speed of light that the internet has foisted upon us. 

We keep hearing about this most unusual of election cycles, but this is only true when looking through the prism (and historical construct) of the traditional news gathering operations. What is called the 24-hour News Cycle is actually just the tip of the Tsunami washing over the planet at a steady speed and ever-quicker pace.  Indeed, the nature of the beast hasn’t changed at all.  It is our outdated techniques, that haven’t kept up with the new reality:  News now emanates at the speed of thought, from thousands or, even, tens of thousands or eenmillions of sources.

Can you imagine the uproar in the monastic world when documents would be would be produced with little or no vetting against the time-honored standards?

In 2008 GLM published an article, “Is Merriam-Webster its own Best Frenemy,”  Where we noted that its newest additions to its Collegiate Dictionary, were older than most entering college students at the time (28 years vs 18!)  Indeed, for the most part, technology could solve most of the Post-truth and Fake News phenomenon.

Since the turn of the 21st century, the Global Language Monitor (GLM) has named the Top Words of Global English.  A decade earlier, the American Dialect Society began to name the Word of The Year for mostly American (and a bit of British) English with little or no use of the then emerging computer power.  By the end of the first decade of the 21st Century, the BBC chose the Global Language Monitor to determine the Top  English Words of the Decade worldwide while they chose an UK-based Linguist to highlight those of the UK.

Methodology:  GLM’s Word of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now approaches some 2.38 billion people, who use the language as a first, second, business language.  To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must meet three criteria:  1)  found globally, 2) have a minimum of 25,000 citations, and 3) have the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage.  Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular professional or social group or geography.  The goal is to find the word usage that will endure the test of time.  GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 350,000 print and electronic global media (not limited to the English-language-based media), as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

One of  the  most surprising  trends in the evolution of the Words of the Year over the last two decades is that they have become decidedly more parochial, and more trivial, as the century has progressed. Now there about a dozen players, all competing for the same space, so the race has been one of dumbing down the various nominees and ultimate winner in an apparently. desperate in their attempt to seek the lowest common denominator, or even worse, to optimize entertainment value.

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 2 billion speakers (January 2017 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, as well as the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801-6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.

 

 

Apocalyptic language has been widely cited as word of the year worthy for the last several years — and rightly so.  In fact, Apocalypse and Armageddon took Global Language Monitors’ honors as Top Global English Words of 2012.  And though GLM’s proprietary algorithms have displayed a predictive element, it’s entirely possible that Apocalyptic language did indeed peak some three years too soon.  In 2016,

1 Bigly Of considerable size, number, quantity, extent, or magnitude; large.
2 Brexit The British Exit from the European Union.
3 Non-binary The legal term for a gender identity between male and female
4 The Love Symbol [a glyph that merges the ancient symbols for man and woman]: the unpronounceable symbol representing “The Artist Formerly Known as Prince.”
5 Zika [fever; or Zika virus disease]: an infectious disease caused by the Zika virus. The virus that causes the disease, mainly spread by the bite of Aedes mosquitoes, was first isolated in Africa in 1947.
6 Gun Culture Gun Violence: encompasses the behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs about firearms and their usage by civilians / violence committed by the use of a gun.
7 Safe Place In the U.S., places where students can retreat to avoid hearing unpleasant words; in the world, places protected from rape, crucifixion, being sold into slavery, etc.
8 Heroin and Fentanyl Strong physiologically addictive narcotics
9 Hooya ha tah it bin (“Son please don’t smuggle yourself”): transliteration of a Somali mother’s plea to her son not to join the refugee flow into Europe.
10 Memory Care An euphemism for Alzheimer care.
11 Presumptive Based on probability or presumption.
12 Texticate Carrying out a conversation through text messaging.
13 Clinton World The private world of Hil and Bill where many of the laws of the political world seem to be suspended. Compare with Steve Job’s “reality distortion field.”
14 Trumpism The emerging political philosophy of the presumptive Republican candidate, whatever that may be.
15 Tennessine A new element on the periodic table, with Atomic number 117 and the symbol Ts.

 

1. Bigly — Things trending larger … bigly. Almost everything trended bigly thus far in 2016 from politics and foreign affairs, to terrorism and gun violence,

2, Brexit — The British Exit from the European Union provides a new vocabulary for future political breakups: Scotxit, Quebecxit and, even, Texit.

3. Non-binary — A legal term for a gender identity between male and female

4. Perhaps the first emoji. The unpronounceable symbol representing the singer formerly known as Prince.

5. Zika — Please note that Rio is not on this list; its spot was taken by the Zika Virus. A potential global pandemic with Rio as its epicenter.

6. Gun Culture / Gun Violence — Gun Culture/Gun Violence are neck-and neck in the ranking here.

7. Safe Place — In the US, places where students can retreat to avoid hearing unpleasant words; in the world, places protected from rape, crucifixion, being sold into slavery, and the like.

8. Heroin and Fentanyl — More deaths from opioids in the US than gun violence and auto accidents combined. Where is the outrage?

9. Hooya ha tah iti bin — “Son please don’t smuggle yourself.” Transliteration of a Somali mother’s plea to her son not to join the refugee flow into Europe.

10. Memory Care — Current euphemism for Alzheimer care.

11. Presumptive — Presumptive Republican nominee, presumptive Democratic nominee, presumptive prime minister, etc. In 2016 the word ‘presumptive’ is bigly.

12. Texticate — Facebook, messaging, twitter, email … everything is reduced to text… the textication of the world as we know it.

13. Clintonworld — The private world of Hil and Bill where many of the laws of the political world seem to be suspended. Cf. Steve Job’s ‘reality distortion field’.

14. Trumpism — The emerging political philosophy of the presumptive Republican candidate,whatever that may be.

15. Tennessine — New element on the periodic table, with Atomic number 117 and the symbol Ts. Some wags say to honor Bluegrass, more likely the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Word Fact:  Alternative spellings for Tenessee

Tanase, Tanasee, Tanase, Tanesi, Tanisee, Tannasie, Tannassie, Tannessee, Tannassy, Tansai, Tenasi, Tanasqui, Tenesay, Tennassee, Tenesee, Tenessee, Tennecy, Tennesy, Tennisee, Tinnace, Tinassee, Tonice, Tunasse, Tunassee, Tunese, Tunesee, Tunissee, Tunnissee.

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Top Trending Business Buzzwords, 3rd Edition

Top Trending Business Buzzwords, 3rd Edition

The World of Business as Reflected in English Language Buzzwords, Second Edition

Austin, Texas, June 17, 2015 — The Global Language Monitor has announced the Top Business Buzzwords of the Year, for Global English, the world’s pre-eminent language of commerce.

It is often noted that the world of business includes its own specialized vocabulary, and this can certainly be found in the English language, the business language of the planet, said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  The Top Trending Business Buzzwords of 2015 represent some six continents, which continues to confirm the ever-expanding nature of the English language. This is the second annual ranking,

GLM’s Word of the Year and Business Buzzwords of the Year rankings are based upon actual word usage throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion people. To qualify for these lists, the words, names, and phrases must be found globally, have a minimum of 25,000 citations. and the requisite ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ of usage. Depth is here defined as appearing in various forms of media; breadth that they must appear world-over, not limited to a particular profession or social group or geography.

Girl-with-Big-Eyes-Reading

Top 50 Business Buzzwords

Rank, Previous Rank, Change, Business Buzzword, Comment

2015       2013       Change Business Buzzword           Comment

1              1              0            Content   — Far and away the No. 1 Business Buzzword

2              37           35           Net-Net   — Consider a sportswriter for the Brooklyn Nets basketball team: The net-net for the Nets was the netting of the final shot.

3              10           7              Big Data   — Soon Human Knowledge will be doubling every second. ’Big’ does not begin to describe what’s coming at us.

4              19           15           At-the-end-of-the-day   — More likely the end of the quarter or fiscal year

5              2              -3            Social Media Reality — Social media impacts less than 15% of the Web

6              15           9              Offline / be offline — The statement is meaningless unless one includes cell phones, tablets, smart TVs, not to mention all atomic clocks.

7              41           34           Facetime   — Before it was a product, it was a meeting with a C-Level executive.

8              9              1              Ping   — High-tech lingo seeping into the mainstream; now it means to get back to you. Originally, a tool to send message packets to a network address to measure the time & quality of the response.

9              44           35           Rock-and-a-hard-place — A supposedly intractable situation though it usually gets back on track (Our ‘between Iraq and a hard place’ is being replaced because of the on-going political situation}

10           20           10           Win-Win — Much more positive than tie-tie or lose-lose

11           35           24           As if it was — Used some four times more than the correct as if it were. You know, conditional voice.

12           7              -5            Utilize (rather than use) — Please deflate the diction and utilize the word use

13           5              -8            Literally — Principally used in a non-literal situation, e.g., “Literally, an explosion of laughter.

14           11           -3            Any noun used as a verb — To concept. To ballpark, and the like …

15           6              -9            Guru — Someone moderately skilled in a subject or particular field (cf. rocket scientist or a brain surgeon).

16           42           26           Re-purpose — Finding a new use for an old solution. Unfortunately, anything thing can be re-purposed, including your job (or yourself).

17           8              -9            Robust — Applies to oh-so-many products: software, tablets (computer and otherwise), coffee, perfume, mileage, and hundreds of others

18           38           20           Value-add — P+E+VA, where Product (is P) + Enhancement (is Ε ), and Value add (is VA)

19           4              -15          Transparency — Remains a goal far from corporate reality; perhaps a handy scale would be 1} Opaque, 2} Translucent, 3) Transparent.

20           12           -8            Seamless — Seldom actually seamless (Cf. Obamacare website), often merely seem less or meaningless

21           3              -18          Sustainability — No. 1 Word in 2007; have been rising in BizBuzz every year

22           51           29           Hashtag — The number-sign and pound- sign grows more powerful every day.

23           16           -7            Bandwidth — Measurement of electronic communications devices to send and receive information with upper and lower limits

24           40           16           Glass is half-full — Used nine times more that glass is half empty

25           22           -3            Pro-active — Evidently better than amateur-active

26           46           20           Quick-and-dirty — Cited tens of thousands of times; we prefer quick-and-clean

27           18           -9            Synergy — The interaction of two efforts that result in a greater return than the sum of the two

28           14           -14          The Cloud — Everything (and everyone) now apparently lives in the cloud through networking clouds pre-date the web by a decade or two

29           36           7              In the Cloud — Yes, dwelling within the Cloud merits a special mention.

30           21           -9            Game changer — A step way below a paradigm-shift but still usually an exaggeration nonetheless.

31           48           17           Touch base — Another baseball allusion: if you don’t actually touch the base you are called out. Cf Cricket allusions, such as using sticky wicket for a quandary.

32           13           -19          Moving Forward — From the results of those countless moving forwards, moving sideways might be more appropriate

33           23           -10          Rock Star — Whats the hierarchy among Guru, Rocket Scientist, Brain Surgeon, and Rock Star?

34           39           5              Future proof — In reality, an impossible feat because it assumes you are cognizant of future events; in Marketing, just another day of concepting.

35           47           12           Push the envelope — A phrase few actually understand; Originally a descriptor of breaking through the sound barrier by X-Series Test Pilots (e.g., X-15).

36           33           -3            Ballpark — Another name for a guesstimate (another baseball allusion).

37           31           -6            Multi-task — Swapping in and out of tasks quickly is the key to multitasking not doing many things as once which actually decreases productivity (as imagined by Dave Nelson and other tech industries leaders in the 1970s).

38           30           -8            110% — We believe it’s time to synchronize the exertion scale. As a hiring manager, how do you compare 110% from an Ivy school with an exertion level of 130% from the Big Ten?

39           26           -13          Resonate — Produce or be filled with a deep, full, reverberating sound, belief or emotion

40           29           -11          Deliverable — An output, product, result, or outcome; a term of great flexibility.

41           27           -14          Monetize — The attempt to transmute Internet lead into gold.

42           34           -8            Flounder — A ship might founder along New England’s rocky coastline. Over time the act of foundering became collated with flounder the fish. Your grasp of the language is telegraphed by this confusion.

43           32           -11          Rocket science — One step up (or down) from a guru; nearly equivalent to a Brain surgeon).

44           17           -27          New paradigm — Revolutionary new ideas that change the then-existing worldview; think Copernicus, think Newton, think Einstein, most definitely not your next product.

45           28           -17          Double Down — To double an investment in an already risky proposition.

46           43           -3            Brain surgery — One step up (or down) from a guru; equivalent to a Rocket Scientist.

47           45           -2            Bleeding edge — Leading edge of the leading edge (top ten percent).

48           50           2              Low-hanging fruit — Easy pickin’s for the sales force; unfortunately, obsolete since 2008

49           24           -25          30,000 foot level — Let’s decide if we are viewing the topic from the 30,000-, 40,000-, or 100,000-foot level. Airlines typically fly at a 35,000-foot cruise level

50           49           -1            Herding cats — Used in high-tech circles for several decades regarding controlling headstrong engineers, a seemingly impossible task.

51           25           -26          Out-of-the-Box (experience) — OOBE is ever more important to the marketing of consumer electronic devices.

This study is updated from earlier in the year.

GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 375,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

In 2003, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Previous to this Payack was the founding president at yourDictionary.com, and a senior executive for a number of leading high tech companies.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.201.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com

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Egad! What’s the ‘chad’ ?

 

Egad! What’s the ‘chad’ blocking the path to the White House?

 

November 13, 2000
Web posted at: 11:19 a.m. EST (1619 GMT)

ATLANTA, Georgia (CNN) — The final answer to who’s going to be the next U.S. president may be determined by “chad.”

  GALLERY

Chads Through History

Chads through history

  GLOSSARY

glossary

Not ready for Webster’s: What is a pregnant chad?

So who, or what, is chad?

A) A country in Africa?

B) The name of a saint?

C) Rob Lowe’s brother?

D) A lowly scrap of paper that may decide who will be the next leader of the free world?

All four answers are correct. Chad is also the name of a couple of major league baseball players and one half of a British pop-singing duo from the ’60s.

But if you guessed “D,” you are informed enough to understand the vote counting process in Florida.

Politicians are tossing the term “chad” around as if everyone were familiar with the word. Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore’s campaign adviser, George Mitchell, is among them.

You can run those machine ballots through five times and you’ll get five different totals because the chads fall off with each count,” he said, explaining on “Fox News Sunday” the reason he believes ballots in Florida should be recounted by hand.

But Mitchell’s use of “chads” betrayed his own lack of familiarity with the word. “Chad is its own plural,” said Paul J.J. Payack, president and CEO of yourdictionary.com, which is based in California.

The Web site www.yourdictionary.com defines the word as follows:

1. The confetti-like scrap punched out of cards or paper tape (also “chaff,” “computer confetti” or “keypunch droppings”).
2. The perforated strips on the edge of paper for sprocket feed printers after they have been separated from the printed portion (also “perf,” “perfory,” or “snaf”).
Etymology: Possibly from the last name of the inventor of the Chadless cardpunch, which cut U-shapes in punch cards, rather than open circles or rectangles. (The U’s formed holes when folded back.)

Chad” would then be a back-formation from “Chadless” misunderstood: If the Chadless keypunches don’t produce it, other keypunches must produce “chad.”

The word appears to have entered the national lexicon in the late 1940s, around the time people began to refer to “bug” as a computer glitch after a researcher blamed a moth among a group of vacuum tubes for affecting ENIAC, the primitive computer powered by thousands of such tubes, said Payack. That was also about the time when IBM began using punch cards that warned users not to fold, spindle or mutilate.

In Florida, vote-counters may have wished for a “chadometer” to measure whether a bit of chad is sufficiently dislodged to qualify it as “dangling.”

When the hand recount began in Palm Beach County, the canvassing board there said it would count a vote if any of the corners of the chad were punched.

The board then decided that they would instead use the “sunlight test” — if they could see sun through an indentation, it would count.

About a quarter of the way through the counting, however, a board member determined that the light test was flawed and told the other members to go back to the first test.

According to county spokesman Bob Nichols, there are five types of chad.

Ones that count:
• Hanging door — one corner hanging off
• Swinging door — two corners hanging off
• Tri-chad — three corners hanging off

Chads that don’t count:
• Pregnant — bulges, but not punched through
• Dimple — simple indentation

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